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The fascinating ALGAE lights up in blue while the photographer runs his hands through the water off the coast of Australia

Fire of the sea: fascinating images of bioluminescent ALGAS that glow brightly in bright blue as the photographer passes his hands through the water off the coast of Australia

  • Jordan Robin, 26, recorded the phenomenon at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay
  • This rare event only occurs on the coast there once or twice a year.
  • It is caused by small organisms called ‘marine spark’ that shine when disturbed.
  • Otherwise, microscopic creatures make the water look reddish.

Fascinating images show the moment when bioluminescent algae glow bright blue when a photographer passes his hand through the sea water off the coast of Australia.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon that he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

The rare event, which only happens there once or twice a year, is caused by microscopic organisms called ‘marine spark’ that shine when disturbed.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

The rare event, which only happens there once or twice a year, is caused by microscopic organisms called 'marine spark' that shine when disturbed.

The rare event, which only happens there once or twice a year, is caused by microscopic organisms called 'marine spark' that shine when disturbed.

The rare event, which only happens there once or twice a year, is caused by microscopic organisms called ‘marine spark’ that shine when disturbed.

In the video, you can see the award-winning photographer moving his hand through the water, which causes the algae to shine with a bright and mysterious blue light.

“This rare occurrence only happens once or twice a year,” said Robin, who comes from New South Wales, Australia.

“The video was taken on January 14, 2020.”

“What can be seen as a red tide during the day, the Noctiluca scintillans microalgae produces a bright blue glow at night, as seen in the video,” Robin added.

Commonly called ‘marine spark’, ‘sea ghost’ or ‘sea fire’, Noctiluca scintillans is a single-celled microscopic organism.

Each individual Noctiluca scintillation measures about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) in diameter and has a tentacle-shaped ‘scourge’ that helps you eat plankton.

Microscopic creatures move in the water column, regulating their buoyancy to move up and down.

In his video, you can see the award-winning 26-year-old photographer moving his hand through the water, which causes the algae to shine with a bright and mysterious blue light.

In his video, you can see the award-winning 26-year-old photographer moving his hand through the water, which causes the algae to shine with a bright and mysterious blue light.

In his video, you can see the award-winning 26-year-old photographer moving his hand through the water, which causes the algae to shine with a bright and mysterious blue light.

“This rare occurrence only happens once or twice a year,” said Robin, who comes from New South Wales, Australia. “The video was taken on January 14, 2020.”

“What can be seen as a red tide during the day, Noctiluca scintillans microalgae produce a bright blue glow at night, as seen in the video,” said Robin.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE CALL ‘SPARKLE DE MAR’?

Commonly called ‘marine spark’, ‘marine ghost’ or ‘sea fire’, Noctiluca scintillans is a single-celled microscopic organism.

They may appear as a red tide during the day, but when disturbed, however, they glow bright blue.

In sufficiently high numbers, this effect can even be detected by satellites that orbit the Earth.

This phenomenon is called the ‘effect of the milky seas’, or ‘mareel’, derived from the old Norse for ‘sea fire’.

Each individual Noctiluca scintillation measures about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) in diameter and has a tentacle-shaped ‘scourge’ that helps you eat plankton.

Microscopic creatures move in the water column, regulating their buoyancy to move up and down.

They are widely distributed in the world’s oceans.

In the image, Noctiluca scintillans as seen under a microscope

In the image, Noctiluca scintillans as seen under a microscope

In the image, Noctiluca scintillans as seen under a microscope

Commonly called 'marine spark', 'marine ghost' or 'sea fire', Noctiluca scintillans is a single-celled microscopic organism

Commonly called 'marine spark', 'marine ghost' or 'sea fire', Noctiluca scintillans is a single-celled microscopic organism

Commonly called ‘marine spark’, ‘marine ghost’ or ‘sea fire’, Noctiluca scintillans is a single-celled microscopic organism

Each scintillation of Noctiluca has a diameter of about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) and has a tentacle-shaped 'flagellum' that helps you eat plankton

Each scintillation of Noctiluca has a diameter of about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) and has a tentacle-shaped 'flagellum' that helps you eat plankton

Each scintillation of Noctiluca has a diameter of about 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) and has a tentacle-shaped ‘flagellum’ that helps you eat plankton

Microscopic creatures move in the water column, regulating their buoyancy to move up and down.

Microscopic creatures move in the water column, regulating their buoyancy to move up and down.

Microscopic creatures move in the water column, regulating their buoyancy to move up and down.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon that he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

Jordan Robin, 26, captured the wonderful natural phenomenon he discovered was taking place at Plantation Point in Jervis Bay, on the east coast of Australia.

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