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The family of Harry Dunn demands that the UK refuse to extradite Julian Assange until the US hands over Anne Sacoolas

Julian Assange should be used as a pawn in the growing diplomatic queue about the death of Harry Dunn, the teen’s family Dominic Raab has told.

The Mail on Sunday can reveal that, in a meeting with the Foreign Minister last month, the family demanded that Britain refuse an American extradition request for WikiLeaks founder Assange.

And they claim that Mr. Raab told them that he was “reviewing all options”.

The relationship between the family and the government has cooled after the revelation of this newspaper that the American fugitive Anne Sacoolas – who fled the country despite accepting responsibility for Harry’s death in a traffic accident last year – was a CIA agent.

Harry Dunn's family demanded that Britain refuse an American extradition request for WikiLeaks founder Assange until Anne Sacoolas is back in the UK

Relations between the family and the government have cooled down after the revelation that the American fugitive Sacoolas was a CIA agent

Relations between the family and the government have cooled down after the revelation that the American fugitive Sacoolas was a CIA agent

The family of Harry Dunn demanded that Britain refuse an American extradition request for WikiLeaks founder Assange until Anne Sacoolas (right) is back in the UK during a meeting with Foreign Minister Dominic Raab last month. Harry, 19, is pictured on the left

Last month, Washington refused a British extradition request for Sacoolas to return to Britain to get justice over the crash outside an American spy base in Northamptonshire last August.

It is believed that her career in espionage is behind the white refusal of US officials to send her back to Britain, but the family says they are “misled.”

They dispute the government’s legal view that Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity at the Supreme Court and have accused British officials of providing the police with incorrect advice that allowed them to flee the country, and then set up a “cover-up.”

The dissident hacker Assange, who has been in jail for 175 years in the US if he is found guilty of 18 national security charges, must be treated tomorrow at Woolwich Crown Court, while the government starts transferring to the Americans.

After spending nearly seven years in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, Assange was arrested in April and has since been detained in Belmarsh prison.

But even if the British courts approve his deportation, Interior Minister Priti Patel can dominate them and she is under increasing pressure to link his case to that of Sacoolas.

Dissident hacker Assange (photo in January), who faces 175 years of imprisonment in the US if he is found guilty of 18 national security charges, owes tomorrow in Woolwich Crown Court, while the government starts transferring to the Americans.

Dissident hacker Assange (photo in January), who faces 175 years of imprisonment in the US if he is found guilty of 18 national security charges, owes Tomorrow in Woolwich Crown Court, while the government starts handing over to the Americans

Dissident hacker Assange (photo in January), who faces 175 years of imprisonment in the US if he is found guilty of 18 national security charges, owes tomorrow in Woolwich Crown Court, while the government starts transferring to the Americans.

Harry’s family claims that Mr. Raab told them that he was “reviewing all options” when they made the extradition requirements. Allies of the Foreign Minister admitted that the Assange case had been raised during the meeting, but insisted that the two cases could not be linked

Harry’s family has demanded that “the British authorities block further renditions to the US, including those from Julian Assange, until Anne Sacoolas is extradited and returned to British soil against the legal system here.”

Their lawyer and adviser Radd Seiger said: “Despite the shameful refusal to extradite Anne Sacoolas, the US continues to strive to extradite people in the UK, such as Julian Assange. In addition, they show an extraordinary amount of hypocrisy. “

He added: “As Dominic Raab told us when we met him on January 27,” we look at all the options. ” We now want him to exercise the option of not extraditing Julian Assange to the US. “

Mr. Raab’s allies admitted that the Assange case had been raised by the Dunn family during the meeting, but insisted that the two cases could not be linked and that extradition conditions do not allow quid pro quo. And a cabinet minister warned that blocking Assange’s rendition “would drop a nuclear bomb into a frayed special relationship.”

The teenage family disputes the government's legal view that Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity in the Supreme Court (mother Charlotte Charles is pictured)

The teenage family disputes the government's legal view that Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity in the Supreme Court (mother Charlotte Charles is pictured)

Anne Sacoolas, 42, fled the UK after crashing against a Harry motorbike on 27 August last year outside a Northamptonshire airbase

Anne Sacoolas, 42, fled the UK after crashing against a Harry motorbike on 27 August last year outside a Northamptonshire airbase

The teenager’s family disputes the government’s legal view that Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity in the High Court and accused British officials of giving the police incorrect advice that allowed her to leave the country (mother Charlotte Charles is seen left)

Apart from that, this newspaper may reveal that Mr. Raab had warned the family that Sacoolas’ ties with the US government meant it was unlikely that she would ever return, but he briefly stopped admitting that she had been a spy. The family has called the meeting “misleading.”

Asked by Harry’s father Tim if Sacoolas was “more than a husband” – after reports that her husband Jonathan was an intelligence officer – Mr. Raab insisted that she had previously worked for the US Department of Foreign Affairs. He said, “She was an official herself, well, she was at one point.”

Raab also warned that Sacoolas’ ties with the US government meant “she’s one of them” and “the shutters have gone down – I think it’s so gross.”

It is when the Foreign Affairs Committee today announces a parliamentary inquiry into diplomatic immunity and extradition. Commission President Tom Tugendhat said last night: “How are we going to balance our relationship?

“We need those who can evade the law to stay and help families face their sorrows.

“And we need balanced treaties to ensure that Britons who are tried in the US are treated in exactly the same way as Americans who are accused of similar crimes in the UK.”

Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters and Vivienne Westwood join hundreds demanding that Julian Assange be released and American rendition be spared

By Harry Howard for MailOnline

Hundreds of people, including designer Vivienne Westwood and Pink Floyd bass player Roger Waters, gathered in London on Saturday to protest against the extradition of Julian Assange and demand that he be released.

The founder of Wikileaks has been held in pre-trial detention since September last year after he had imposed a 50-week prison sentence for violating his bail conditions while in the Ecuadorian embassy in London.

He entered the building in 2012 to prevent extradition to Sweden for allegations of sexual offenses, which he has always refused and subsequently dropped.

Hundreds of people, including designer Vivienne Westwood, have gathered in London to protest against the extradition of Julian Assange and demand that he be released

Hundreds of people, including designer Vivienne Westwood, have gathered in London to protest against the extradition of Julian Assange and demand that he be released

Pink Floyd bass player Roger Waters is also at the protest outside Australia House

Pink Floyd bass player Roger Waters is also at the protest outside Australia House

Hundreds of people, including designer Vivienne Westwood and Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters, gathered in London to protest the extradition of Julian Assange and demand that he be released

The founder of Wikileaks has been held in pre-trial detention since September last year after he had imposed a 50-week prison sentence for violating his bail conditions while in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Pictured from left to right: former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, Mrs. Westwood, Wikileaks editor Kristinn Hrafnsonn, Mr. Assange's father John Shipton and singer Mr. Waters

The founder of Wikileaks has been held in pre-trial detention since September last year after he had imposed a 50-week prison sentence for violating his bail conditions while in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Pictured from left to right: former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, Mrs. Westwood, Wikileaks editor Kristinn Hrafnsonn, Mr. Assange's father John Shipton and singer Mr. Waters

The founder of Wikileaks has been held in pre-trial detention since September last year after he had imposed a 50-week prison sentence for violating his bail conditions while in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Pictured from left to right: former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, Mrs. Westwood, Wikileaks editor Kristinn Hrafnsonn, Mr. Assange’s father John Shipton and singer Mr. Waters

The 48-year-old is expected to face 18 charges in the US, including a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion, about the release of US cables a decade ago. If he is found guilty, he can get up to 175 years in prison.

Among the crowd of demonstrators gathering outside the home of Australia was Mrs. Westwood, 78, who was depicted with a headband adorned with the word “Angel.”

There was also the former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, 58, and musician Mr Waters, 76.

The 48-year-old is expected to face 18 charges in the US, including a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion, about the release of US cables a decade ago. If he is found guilty, he can get up to 175 years in prison.

Among the crowd of protesters who have gathered outside the home of Australia is Mrs. Westwood, 78, who was depicted with a headband decorated with the word “Angel.”

There is also the former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis (58) and Pink Floyd bass player Roger Waters (76).

Assange entered the building in 2012 to prevent extradition to Sweden for allegations of sexual offenses, which he has always refused and subsequently dropped. Pictured: Mr. Assange gestures with the media after being brought to Westminster court last year when he left the embassy

Assange entered the building in 2012 to prevent extradition to Sweden for allegations of sexual offenses, which he has always refused and subsequently dropped. Pictured: Mr. Assange gestures with the media after being brought to Westminster court last year when he left the embassy

Assange entered the building in 2012 to prevent extradition to Sweden for allegations of sexual offenses, which he has always refused and subsequently dropped. Pictured: Mr. Assange gestures with the media after being brought to Westminster court last year when he left the embassy

The 48-year-old is expected to face 18 charges in the US, including a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion, about the release of US cables a decade ago. If he is found guilty, he can get up to 175 years in prison. Pictured: one of the demonstrators at the meeting

The 48-year-old is expected to face 18 charges in the US, including a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion, about the release of US cables a decade ago. If he is found guilty, he can get up to 175 years in prison. Pictured: one of the demonstrators at the meeting

The 48-year-old is expected to face 18 charges in the US, including a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion, about the release of US cables a decade ago. If he is found guilty, he can get up to 175 years in prison. Pictured: one of the demonstrators at the meeting

Among the crowd of protesters who have gathered outside the home of Australia is Mrs. Westwood, 78, who was depicted with a headband decorated with the word “Angel.”

Both men joined fashion designer Mrs. Westwood, Mr. Assange’s father John Shipton, and current Wikileaks editor Kristinn Hrafnsson and held up a banner with the text “Do not extradite Assange” in capital letters.

Other banners at the protest were: “journalism is not a crime,” “free Assange free,” and “the truth will set you free,” although the latter had crossed out a few words, it said, “the truth will get you imprisoned “.

Mr. Assange’s father, Mr. Shipton, delivered a speech to the crowd in Parliament Square.

He said: ‘I look over the crowd and see many familiar faces in the crowd and the press that support Julian and I thank you.

‘I bring you his affection, his noble purpose and his strength of character after nine years. I don’t really understand why Julian is in prison here. “

He described the imprisonment of the founder of Wikileaks as “random detention.”

There is also the former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, 58, who was depicted among the crowd

There is also the former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, 58, who was depicted among the crowd

There is also the former Greek finance minister Yannis Varoufakis, 58, who was depicted among the crowd

One of the banners read: “Do not send Assange” and was placed on the side of a van and stopped by Mrs. Westwood, Mr. Waters, John Asston’s father, Mr. Assange and current Wikileaks editor Kristinn Hrafnsson

Many demonstrators wore captive-style costumes and a series of masks, including one depicting American President Donald Trump.

Speaking at the extradition protest, Sinthia Surace, 22, whose family fled the civil war in Sri Lanka, said, “It took a lot of brave people to expose all the crimes affecting my community directly. That’s why I care about voices like Julian.

“I don’t think we should punish him for the wrong behavior of the US government. He always says privacy for the citizen but transparency for the government, especially when it comes to human lives. “

Mrs. Surace said she believes “all protests and banging on the doors of HMP Belmarsh” will make a difference for Assange.

Other banners at the protest were: “journalism is not a crime,” “free Assange free,” and “the truth will set you free,” although the latter had crossed out a few words, it said, “the truth will get you imprisoned ”

Many demonstrators wore captive-style costumes and a series of masks, including one depicting US President Donald Trump

Many demonstrators wore captive-style costumes and a series of masks, including one depicting US President Donald Trump

Many demonstrators wore captive-style costumes and a series of masks, including one depicting US President Donald Trump

The demonstrators gathered in front of Australia House in central London and held placards, one of which said “crushing Assange is the start of the guard state”

The protest comes after Labor shadow Chancellor John McDonnell caused anger from Jewish groups by comparing Mr. Assange’s struggle to evade extradition from the plight of a French soldier falsely accused of betrayal by anti-Semites.

The shadow chancellor of Labor made the remark when on Thursday he became the oldest politician who visited the founder of Wikileaks in prison in London.

He described American attempts to extradite the Australian as’ the Dreyfus case of our time – a comparison with the French officer Alfred Dreyfus from the 19th century.

He was convicted of treason on a court martial from 1895 on treason many of whom thought he had been charged against him for being Jewish.

Mrs. Westwood has long been a supporter of Mr. Assange and visited him when he was at the Ecuadorian embassy

Mrs. Westwood has long been a supporter of Mr. Assange and visited him when he was at the Ecuadorian embassy

Mrs. Westwood has long been a supporter of Mr. Assange and visited him when he was at the Ecuadorian embassy

Mr. Assange’s father, Mr. Shipton (center), delivered a speech to the crowd in Parliament Square. He said: “I look over the crowd and see many familiar faces in the crowd and the press that support Julian and I thank you.” Shown: Wikileaks editor Mr Hrafnsonn, Mr Shipton and Mrs Westwood

Veteran LGBT campaigner Peter Tatchell was also present at the protest. He held a poster with the text: “No extradition! Julian Assange told the truth. He uncovered American war crimes

He was later acquitted after a long campaign with intellectuals such as novelist Emile Zola, who wrote a famous indictment about the persecution with the title J’Accuse (I accuse).

Labor has been swallowed up by an anti-Semitism crisis led by Jeremy Corbyn and Mr. McDonnell’s remarks led to a furious backlash.

Karen Pollock, the director of the Holocaust Educational Trust, said: “Dreyfus was a French artillery officer falsely accused of treason because he was Jewish.

“Find out how or why John McDonnell could make such an inappropriate comparison with the Assange case. Scandalous, ridiculous and so deeply offensive. “

Mrs. Westwood was also pictured with the media gathering to talk to demonstrators outside of Australia House

Mrs. Westwood was also pictured with the media gathering to talk to demonstrators outside of Australia House

Mrs. Westwood was also pictured with the media gathering to talk to demonstrators outside of Australia House

Some demonstrators wore British and American flags that they attached to themselves while holding up posters and banners

Some demonstrators wore British and American flags that they attached to themselves while holding up posters and banners

Some demonstrators wore British and American flags that they attached to themselves while holding up posters and banners

The protest comes after Labor shadow Chancellor John McDonnell caused anger from Jewish groups by comparing Mr. Assange's struggle to evade extradition from the plight of a French soldier falsely accused of betrayal by anti-Semites

The protest comes after Labor shadow Chancellor John McDonnell caused anger from Jewish groups by comparing Mr. Assange's struggle to evade extradition from the plight of a French soldier falsely accused of betrayal by anti-Semites

The protest comes after Labor shadow Chancellor John McDonnell caused anger from Jewish groups by comparing Mr. Assange’s struggle to evade extradition from the plight of a French soldier falsely accused of betrayal by anti-Semites

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