The exit polls show the biggest party of the Swedish Prime Minister's Social Democrats

Member of the EU parliament Lars Adaktusson cheers over the results from the exit poll at an election watch party in Stockholm.

The Swedish Social Democrats appear to be the country's biggest power, according to exit polls as they close the polls.

With Sweden's right-wing Democrats behind, a TV4 exit poll predicted that Prime Minister Stefan Lofven's Social Democrats would win 25.4 percent of the vote, while the public broadcaster SVT credited them with 26.2 percent. hundred after yesterday's elections.

Both scores, if confirmed, would be the lowest in more than a century.

The right-wing Swedish Democrats (SD) were expected to make profits, but less than opinion polls had suggested during the campaign, both showed exit polls.

People look and react in the electoral party of the Social Democratic Party in Stockholm.

AAP

In the TV4 survey, conservative moderates were expected to come in second with 18.4 percent, while SD was credited with 16.3 percent of the vote, compared to 12.9 percent four years ago.

Meanwhile, the SVT survey placed SD in second place with 19.2 percent, followed by moderates with 17.8 percent.

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven urged voters to unite against forces that promote hatred before national elections.

The SD gains will come at the expense of the center-left Social Democrats of Lofven and the main center-right party, none of which is expected to win the majority based on public opinion polls.

He labeled a vote for SD as "dangerous" and "counterproductive."

"We will never get used to (hate), we will resist, we will defend equality." That is our message to (the Holocaust survivor) Hedi Fried and all the survivors, that is our message to Sweden: we will stand up "

He said his party was determined to oppose fascism, directing its message to Holocaust survivors.

"We will never get used to (hate), we will resist, we will defend equality." That is our message to (the Holocaust survivor) Hedi Fried and all the survivors, that is our message to Sweden: we will stand up "

Swedish far-right Democratic leader expects a good election result

Immigration is a big concern for voters

The issue of immigration has been in the foreground during the election campaign.

The leader of the SD, Jimmie Akesson, said that his plan to reduce the intake of immigrants would be considered "a normal policy in the rest of Europe" and a much-needed policy resumption.

Stefan Lofven, leader of the Social Democratic Party and Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party during a televised debate.

Stefan Lofven, leader of the Social Democratic Party and Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party during a televised debate.

AAP

Voters are concerned that the increase in immigrant intake has put pressure on housing, health care and welfare services.

The country accepted a record of 163,000 asylum seekers during the 2015 migration crisis. That level represents the highest intake in the EU, per head of population.

Violence is also a concern, as the SD links an increase in shootings with the growing intake of immigrants. However, the correlation is not supported by official figures.

The SD said it also wants a "Swexit" referendum to prepare the country's withdrawal from the European Union. The move, however, is not supported by the centrist parties and is unlikely to continue.

A bold vote before the elections to the European Parliament

Other countries in Europe are watching closely the results of the Swedish elections to see if the SD becomes the second largest party in the country.

If the projections of a 25 percent share of the vote are correct, then the SD could become the largest populist party in the Nordic region. That title is currently in the hands of the Danish People's Party, which won 21 percent in 2015. The Far Right Alternative for Germany ranks second with 12.6 percent of the votes in the 2017 German elections .

Before next year's European Parliament elections, observers will be concerned that the result may tarnish the democratic credentials of the country and increase the volume of Eurosceptic voices in the EU.

The former prime minister of the moderate Swedish party, Fredrik Reinfeldt, described his country as an example of a "humanitarian superpower" in 2014.

The polling stations are scheduled to open at 4 p.m. AEST and schedule to close 12 hours later.

The exit polls are expected around that time, and the results of the vote count will be known later in the evening.