The Ever Given FINALLY arrives in Rotterdam to unload its cargo after megaship blocked Suez Canal

The giant container ship that blocked the Suez Canal for nearly a week and halted £42 billion in world trade four months ago has finally arrived at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands to begin unloading its cargo.

As dawn broke over the sprawling harbor, the Ever Given entered the Amazon Harbor container terminal months later than originally planned.

The Panama-flagged vessel was en route to Rotterdam on March 23 when it plowed into the sandy bank of a single-lane stretch of the canal about 6 miles north of the southern entrance, near the city of Suez.

A massive salvage effort six days later freed the skyscraper-sized ship, allowing a queue of hundreds of waiting ships to pass through the canal.

“It was a great relief to see her and a special moment,” said Hans Nagtegaal, container director at the port of Rotterdam, about the arrival of Ever Given.

“Finally we can get the job done with unloading and hopefully we’ll get her back to a normal sailing routine,” he said.

Nagtegaal said the Ever Given will remain in Rotterdam until Monday, when she is expected to sail to Felixstowe in Britain, before heading to a dry dock in Dunkirk, France, for a further inspection.

The giant container ship that blocked the Suez Canal for nearly a week and halted £42 billion in world trade four months ago has finally arrived at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands to begin unloading its cargo.

The giant container ship that blocked the Suez Canal for nearly a week and halted £42 billion in world trade four months ago has finally arrived at the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands to begin unloading its cargo.

As dawn broke over the sprawling harbor, the Ever Given sailed into the Amazon Harbor container terminal months later than originally planned.

As dawn broke over the sprawling harbor, the Ever Given sailed into the Amazon Harbor container terminal months later than originally planned.

As dawn broke over the sprawling harbor, the Ever Given sailed into the Amazon Harbor container terminal months later than originally planned.

The Panama-flagged vessel (pictured in Rotterdam) was en route to Rotterdam when it plowed into the sandy bank of a single-lane stretch of the canal on March 23, about 6 miles north of the southern entrance, near the city of Suez.

The Panama-flagged vessel (pictured in Rotterdam) was en route to Rotterdam when it plowed into the sandy bank of a single-lane stretch of the canal on March 23, about 6 miles north of the southern entrance, near the city of Suez.

The Panama-flagged vessel (pictured in Rotterdam) was en route to Rotterdam when it plowed into the sandy bank of a single-lane stretch of the canal on March 23, about 6 miles north of the southern entrance, near the city of Suez.

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The container ship Ever Given arrives at the ECT (Europe Container Terminals) Delta terminal in the port of Rotterdam

The Ever Given will remain in Rotterdam until Monday, when she is expected to sail to Felixstowe in Britain before heading to a dry dock in Dunkirk in France for a further inspection.

The Ever Given will remain in Rotterdam until Monday, when she is expected to sail to Felixstowe in Britain before heading to a dry dock in Dunkirk in France for a further inspection.

The Ever Given will remain in Rotterdam until Monday, when she is expected to sail to Felixstowe in Britain before heading to a dry dock in Dunkirk in France for a further inspection.

The Taiwan-operated vessel became diagonally stuck in the narrow but crucial artery of world trade during a sandstorm on March 23, triggering a massive six-day effort by Egyptian personnel and international salvage specialists to free it.

The Taiwan-operated vessel became diagonally stuck in the narrow but crucial artery of world trade during a sandstorm on March 23, triggering a massive six-day effort by Egyptian personnel and international salvage specialists to free it.

The Taiwan-operated vessel became diagonally stuck in the narrow but crucial artery of world trade during a sandstorm on March 23, triggering a massive six-day effort by Egyptian personnel and international salvage specialists to free it.

Three weeks ago, the Ever Given left the canal’s Great Bitter Lake, where it had been held for more than three months amid a financial dispute.

It was released to continue its journey after the ship’s Japanese owner, Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd, reached a compensation arrangement with the canal authorities after weeks of negotiations and a legal standoff.

The nearly 200,000-ton container ship got stuck in the canal during a sandstorm on March 23, blocking a vital artery from Asia to Europe that carries 10 percent of global maritime trade and provides Egypt with vital revenue.

After a 24-hour salvage operation to free it, Egypt seized the vessel and demanded compensation from its owners Shoei Kisen Kaisha for lost canal revenue, salvage costs and damage to the canal.

The Suez Canal Authority announced last month that it had signed a nondisclosure agreement with the Japanese company before reaching a final deal.

Cairo initially demanded $916 million in compensation before it was reduced to about $550 million, but the final amount was the subject of heavy negotiations.

The Ever Given will arrive early in the morning on July 29, 2021 at the Europoort harbor in Rotterdam

The Ever Given will arrive early in the morning on July 29, 2021 at the Europoort harbor in Rotterdam

The Ever Given will arrive early in the morning on July 29, 2021 at the Europoort harbor in Rotterdam

Three weeks ago, the Ever Given left the canal's Great Bitter Lake, where it had been held for more than three months amid a financial dispute.  Pictured: Once given in Rotterdam

Three weeks ago, the Ever Given left the canal's Great Bitter Lake, where it had been held for more than three months amid a financial dispute.  Pictured: Once given in Rotterdam

Three weeks ago, the Ever Given left the canal’s Great Bitter Lake, where it had been held for more than three months amid a financial dispute. Pictured: Once given in Rotterdam

Egypt's Suez Canal Authority (SCA) said the Ever Given would be freed from a lake in the middle of the canal, where the ship and its crew were seized while the two sides negotiated a settlement.

Egypt's Suez Canal Authority (SCA) said the Ever Given would be freed from a lake in the middle of the canal, where the ship and its crew were seized while the two sides negotiated a settlement.

Egypt’s Suez Canal Authority (SCA) said the Ever Given would be freed from a lake in the middle of the canal, where the ship and its crew were seized while the two sides negotiated a settlement.

Owner Shoei Kisen and the ship’s insurers had disputed the ship’s claim and detention under an Egyptian court order.

The two sides have blamed each other for the ship running aground, with bad weather, poor decisions on the part of the canal authorities, and human and technical errors all tossed around as possible factors.

The six-day blockade disrupted worldwide shipping. Hundreds of ships waited in place to unblock the canal, while some ships were forced to take the much longer route around the Cape of Good Hope on Africa’s southern tip, requiring additional fuel and other costs.

Egypt, which earns more than $5 billion a year from the channel, lost between $12 million and $15 million in revenue each day, the SCA said.

In April, maritime data company Lloyd’s List said the blockade by the ship, which is longer than four football fields, was holding up some $9.6 billion worth of cargo every day.

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