The EU elections take place in Ireland and the Czech Republic

Irish voters started voting in the elections to the European Parliament on day two of the 28-nation poll.

Great Britain and the Netherlands held the elections yesterday, with 427 million people eligible to vote – and a Dutch exit poll showed an early setback for European populists.

Most major parties in Dublin have campaigned massively to strengthen the country's place in the EU in the midst of a swirling political unrest in Britain.

Candidates for the European Parliament have also promised to limit the economic shock of the Brexit – which could radiate in Ireland.

Two Irish Members of the European Parliament will be elected for new seats created pending the 73 legislators in Great Britain who are leaving their positions.

However, they will not be able to take their positions until Great Britain finalizes its split with the EU.

Supporters of the Dutch Labor Party celebrate it after an exit poll showed them on their way to an unexpected victory in the elections to the European Parliament

Supporters of the Dutch Labor Party celebrate it after an exit poll showed them on their way to an unexpected victory in the elections to the European Parliament

European elections by number

427million

The estimated number of voters in EU countries, making these elections the second largest democratic competition in the world, after India.

Voters are eligible for 18 years in most EU countries, but Greeks can vote for 17 and Austria and Maltese at 4 PM.

42.6 percent

The turnout percentage in 2014, the worst ever recorded in a European election.

European participation has fallen steadily since the first vote in 1979, when it reached 62 percent.

Belgium, where voting is compulsory, had the highest turnout with 89.7 percent.

The lowest percentages were shown by the Slovaks at 13.1 percent, Czechs at 18.2 percent and Poland with 23.8 percent.

751

The number of Members of the European Parliament who will take part in the elections.

Seats are proportional to the population: Germany has 96 MEPs and France 74, while Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg have only six.

Once Britain leaves the EU, there are only 705 MPs in the Chamber. Some of the UK seats will be redistributed and others will be embalmed until new Member States join.

Despite the great uncertainty about the Brexit, countries that are going to win seats will vote for these extra MEPs in the May election, but the winners will only assume if the divorce is official.

53

The average age of the elected MEPs in 2014 – including a 26-year-old Dane and a 91-year-old Greek.

In Italy and Greece the minimum age is 25 years, in Romania this is 23 years.

36.9 percent

The number of women elected to parliament in 2014 was just over one third, the most ever.

Since the first elections in 1979, when the parliament was only 16.3 percent women, this share has risen steadily.

Parity or better is currently being achieved in five Member States: Finland (10 out of 13 seats), Ireland (six out of 11), Croatia (six out of eleven), Malta (three out of six) and Sweden (10 out of 20) . ).

Cyprus (one of the six), Bulgaria (three of the 17) and Lithuania (two of the eleven) are the worst performing countries.

The Czech Republic will start its two-day voting procedure later on Friday.

There, Prime Minister Andrej Babis is confronted with criminal charges about EU subsidy fraud and an EU investigation into his dual role as a politician and entrepreneur.

In recent weeks, thousands of people have met against Babis and his newly appointed Justice Minister for fear of trying to clear him.

Nevertheless, it is predicted that the warring party will win the most votes in the EU elections.

Great Britain and the Netherlands started the voting process yesterday, tipping Nigel Farage's Brexit party to win an election in the UK that should never have taken place.

Some polls have shown that the conservatives are withdrawing into single, because furious voters blame the ruling party for failing to get the Brexit overrun.

In the Netherlands, an exit poll showed a surprise result with the left Labor team apparently on track for the win.

Timmermans Labor Party, Vice-President of the European Commission, had campaigned for a fierce pro-Europe platform.

The party of the Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte and the populist Forum for Democracy took second and third place respectively.

The Democracy Forum of climate skeptic populist leader Thierry Baudet was expected to win three seats, as did the environmental party Groenlinks.

Geert Wilders' anti-Islam freedom party, who has lost votes to Baudet, would in the meantime fall into one chair of his current three.

Opinion polls in the run-up to the vote predicted that Rutte and Baudet's parties would take the lead.

The rest of the EU will vote on the weekend before the results appear late on Sunday.

More than 40 million European voters are eligible to elect 751 members of the European Parliament.

Pro-European leaders fear a good display for populist Eurosceptics who will disrupt decision-making in Brussels and who threaten reform efforts with closer integration.

Matteo Salvini of the anti-immigrant league of Italy and Marine Le Pen of the extreme right-wing National Rally (RN) of France want their Europe of Nations and Freedom (ENF) group to be the third largest in Brussels.

The League has surpassed opinion polls in Italy.

The Dutch politician Frans Timmermans votes yesterday in a polling station in Heerlen. Exit polls showed his Labor party on track for a surprise victory

The Dutch politician Frans Timmermans votes yesterday in a polling station in Heerlen. Exit polls showed his Labor party on track for a surprise victory

The Dutch politician Frans Timmermans votes yesterday in a polling station in Heerlen. Exit polls showed his Labor party on track for a surprise victory

Dutch voters put their vote in the European elections at Schiphol

Dutch voters put their vote in the European elections at Schiphol

Dutch voters put their vote in the European elections at Schiphol

Le Pen wants to slap the failing French presidency of Emmanuel Macron by catching up with his centrist, pro-European party Republic on the Move.

Losing Le Pen & # 39; s RN – formerly known as the National Front – can be a shrill blow to Macron's ambitions.

Sources in the neighborhood of Macron say that a bad loss could lead to a major reshuffle of the cabinet, with Prime Minister Edouard Philippe's job as online.

His European allies, grouped in the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), can ultimately only get around 100 seats.

Surveys give Le Pen's party a slight lead, with around 23 percent support.

In Germany, surveys show Chancellor Angela Merkel's CDU party first, with the Greens second.

Former Luxembourg Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker resigns after five years as President of the European Commission.

The hunt will also continue if someone replaces former Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk as head of the EU Council.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron (pictured earlier this week in Paris) is under pressure from his election opponent, Marine Le Pen 2017.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron (pictured earlier this week in Paris) is under pressure from his election opponent, Marine Le Pen 2017.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron (pictured earlier this week in Paris) is under pressure from his election opponent, Marine Le Pen 2017.

Nigel Farage votes in the European elections in Great Britain, where his Brexit party is kicked to win, while voters punish conservatives for failing to persuade Brexit

Nigel Farage votes in the European elections in Great Britain, where his Brexit party is kicked to win, while voters punish conservatives for failing to persuade Brexit

Nigel Farage votes in the European elections in Great Britain, where his Brexit party is kicked to win, while voters punish conservatives for failing to persuade Brexit

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