The eight-year-old cancer survivor breaks the Girl Scout cookie sales record with 32,000 boxes

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An eight-year-old cancer survivor in California broke the record for Girl Scout cookie sales by moving more than 32,000 boxes in a giant haul.

Lilly Bumpus, from San Bernardino, defeated Ewing’s Sarcoma – a cancerous growth that grows in the bones or soft tissue around bones – as a toddler and is now an active social media fundraiser.

Her award-winning Team Lilly Foundation provides families with emergency financial assistance and covers funeral expenses.

Every year, Lilly, her mother, her grandparents and numerous volunteers spend the holidays filling up personalized care packages for children across the country who are battling childhood cancer.

When the Girl Scout cookie season started two months ago, Lilly began posting regular updates to the 157,000 followers on her Facebook page to chart her progress.

“It feels like the world believes in me and it feels really good,” said Lilly. “It means so much to me that people come to support me by buying cookies.”

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Lilly Bumpus, eight years old, celebrates the record for the most Girl Scout cookie sales

Lilly Bumpus, eight years old, celebrates the record for the most Girl Scout cookie sales

Lilly is celebrating with her mother, Trish Bauer, when the milestone was reached

Lilly is celebrating with her mother, Trish Bauer, when the milestone was reached

Lilly is celebrating with her mother, Trish Bauer, when the milestone was reached

Lilly spoke of her pleasure to break the record and sell the most cookies

Lilly spoke of her pleasure to break the record and sell the most cookies

Lilly spoke of her pleasure to break the record and sell the most cookies

Her mother, Trish Bauer, said she was impressed with her daughter’s drive.

“She has shown our community and the world that it is more than just buying cookies or buying a product,” she said.

‘It supports someone’s dream. Whether it’s a business owner or an eight-year-old girl swinging Girl Scout cookies, Lilly encouraged people to support a dream and a mission, not just a product. ‘

Funding raised will benefit childhood cancer research and nurture homeless communities.

On March 22, Lilly’s troop, made up mostly of cancer survivors, gathered outside her San Bernardino home to surprise her with the reveal of her new record.

“A lot of people have approached us saying that we must have gotten big companies or sponsors to buy from us, or big donations,” Bauer said. Mercury News

Lilly, pictured with her mother Trish Bauer, worked for two months to break the record

Lilly, pictured with her mother Trish Bauer, worked for two months to break the record

Lilly, pictured with her mother Trish Bauer, worked for two months to break the record

The largest order placed was 100 boxes. Lilly reached 32,000 boxes from everyone who saw value in buying one box, two boxes, four boxes, and everyone worked together to try to be a small piece of a very large puzzle.

“That’s magical to me.”

The Girl Scouts were not allowed to go from door to door this year due to the pandemic.

Instead, they had to rely on online purchases and deliveries.

For more than two months, Lilly and her family have been delivering cookies before and after school.

In the evenings, Lilly used social media to write about her day and respond to comments.

Boxes from their San Bernardino home have landed in all 50 states, as well as Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, Egypt, France, and Italy.

“Lilly has always been blessed with the community of supporters she has had with her,” Bauer said.

But for the first time, the world saw that she had her own voice, her own mission, her own site that’s bigger than cancer.

“She just needed a space to do her own thing, and this was it.”

The previously reported record was 26,086 boxes, recently set by a New Jersey girl scout.

“She sold her crazy heart to the last day of Girl Scout cookie season,” Bauer said

A celebration was held in San Bernardino to mark Lilly's triumph

A celebration was held in San Bernardino to mark Lilly's triumph

A celebration was held in San Bernardino to mark Lilly’s triumph

“She sold her crazy heart to the last day of Girl Scout cookie season,” Bauer said.

When I told her at the start of the season how difficult it would be to sell this year, she said to me, ‘Nothing is impossible if everyone chooses to make it possible. ‘

“The reason I wanted to beat the record is because I wanted to help all kinds of Girl Scouts in the world and tell them they can do it just like I do,” Lilly told the paper.

‘I just wanted to be inspiring.

“I wanted to help.”