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The E-scooter menace, a drug-addled e-scooter, is banned from driving all motor vehicles for a whole year

A drugged worker is banned from driving a motor vehicle for a year after he was caught driving his e-scooter on a sidewalk while high on cannabis.

Road threat Colin Moore, 38, was stopped by police after flinging mysterious white powder around his nose on the sidewalk. A court heard he had a seizure when he was ordered to take a blood test.

A measurement showed that Moore, of Southport, Merseyside, had 2.5 micrograms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per liter of blood. THC is the main active ingredient in cannabis and the legal drug use limit is 2mcg/l.

At Sefton Magistrates’ Court, Moore admitted driving under the influence of drugs and was disqualified for 12 months.

Poser: Colin Moore, 38, Banned From Driving For A Year After Being Caught Riding An E-Scooter While High On Drugs.  He Is Depicted Giving A 'Peace Sign'

Poser: Colin Moore, 38, banned from driving for a year after being caught riding an e-scooter while high on drugs. He is depicted giving a ‘peace sign’

A Court Heard That The 38-Year-Old (Pictured) From Southport Had A Mysterious White Powder Around His Nose And That When Ordered By Police To Take A Blood Test, He Had A Seizure

A Court Heard That The 38-Year-Old (Pictured) From Southport Had A Mysterious White Powder Around His Nose And That When Ordered By Police To Take A Blood Test, He Had A Seizure

A court heard that the 38-year-old (pictured) from Southport had a mysterious white powder around his nose and that when ordered by police to take a blood test, he had a seizure

The incident happened in July of this year when Moore was driving his 30 mph electric machine through the streets of Bootle.

It comes as Britain faces a sharp rise in the number of people killed in e-scooter accidents, with the number of fatal collisions tripling in a year.

Lionel Cope, prosecutor, said: “He was seen riding an electric scooter erratically on the sidewalk. Officers continued to watch him as he moved onto the road and then back onto the sidewalk before coming to a stop.

“It was noticed that he had some white residue around his nose. He was road tested for drugs and another blood test reading was 2.9 mcg for tetrahydrocannabinol. He has six previous convictions.”

In his defense, lawyer Grahame Halliwell said: ‘He had a seizure and an ambulance was called. Then he had another attack. He was unconscious when they drew blood, but he’s not trying to challenge the procedure.

“He works as a labourer, but the work is quiet at the moment. He has been referred to the Walton Neurological Center to see if it can be determined why he had the seizure he had. He’s never had one.’

Worker Moore (Pictured In Hi-Vis) Had 2.5 Micrograms Of Tetrahydrocannabinol (Thc) Per Liter Of Blood.  Thc Is The Main Active Ingredient In Cannabis And The Legal Drug Use Limit Is 2Mcg/L

Worker Moore (Pictured In Hi-Vis) Had 2.5 Micrograms Of Tetrahydrocannabinol (Thc) Per Liter Of Blood.  Thc Is The Main Active Ingredient In Cannabis And The Legal Drug Use Limit Is 2Mcg/L

Worker Moore (pictured in hi-vis) had 2.5 micrograms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per liter of blood. THC is the main active ingredient in cannabis and the legal drug use limit is 2mcg/l

Moore'S Conviction Comes As Deaths From E-Scooter Accidents Tripled In A Year And Accident Rates Also Rose 28 Percent Over The 12-Month Period

Moore'S Conviction Comes As Deaths From E-Scooter Accidents Tripled In A Year And Accident Rates Also Rose 28 Percent Over The 12-Month Period

Moore’s conviction comes as deaths from e-scooter accidents tripled in a year and accident rates also rose 28 percent over the 12-month period

In 2019 Emily Hartridge (Pictured) Of Channel 4 And Youtube Was Killed In What Was Believed To Be Britain'S First Electric Scooter Fatality

In 2019 Emily Hartridge (Pictured) Of Channel 4 And Youtube Was Killed In What Was Believed To Be Britain'S First Electric Scooter Fatality

In 2019 Emily Hartridge (pictured) of Channel 4 and YouTube was killed in what was believed to be Britain’s first electric scooter fatality

Moore was also fined £80 and ordered to pay £152 in costs and a victim’s allowance.

The conviction comes just days after new government data showed that the number of deaths and accidents caused by e-scooter riders had skyrocketed over the past year.

E-scooter deaths TRIPLE in one year

New government data released this month shows that e-scooter accidents and deaths are on the rise.

  • There were 12 deaths involving e-scooters – an increase from four the year before.
  • There were 1,349 e-scooter crashes — 28 percent more than 978.
  • There were 1,437 fatalities in e-scooter accidents – compared to 1,033.
  • Of all accidents, 346 involved one e-scooter with no other vehicles involved – compared to 200.

Statistics show that in the year to June there were 12 deaths from e-scooters and a whopping 1,349 accidents.

This compared to four deaths the year before and 978 accidents – a significantly lower number. About 11 of the 12 deaths were e-scooter users, while one was pedestrian.

In 2019, Channel 4 and YouTube star Emily Hartridge was killed in what was believed to be Britain’s first fatal accident involving an electric scooter.

The 35-year-old crashed into a lorry while riding an e-scooter near her home in Battersea, south London.

In July, a three-year-old toddler suffered “life-changing” injuries after being mowed down by a young man on an e-scooter.

The burglary happened while the little girl was out for a walk in Myatt’s Field Park, Lambeth, in South London.

The Metropolitan Police said the man stopped to say sorry. But the toddler’s condition later deteriorated and she was rushed to hospital.

It prompted a call from detectives for the man to turn himself in and “do the right thing,” with the Met saying the child’s injuries were “life-changing.”

In the same month, 80-year-old grandmother Sarah Carter was left with a broken wrist, cracked jaw and cheekbone after being knocked to the ground by an e-scooter.

Sarah Carter, 80, Suffered A Broken Wrist, Cracked Cheekbone And Jaw After Being Hit By An E-Scooter In Canterbury, Kent

Sarah Carter, 80, Suffered A Broken Wrist, Cracked Cheekbone And Jaw After Being Hit By An E-Scooter In Canterbury, Kent

Sarah Carter, 80, suffered a broken wrist, cracked cheekbone and jaw after being hit by an e-scooter in Canterbury, Kent

She labeled the e-scooters as ‘deadly’ and labeled the municipality as ‘irresponsible’ due to the lack of infrastructure.

After her accident, she said, “Another elderly person could very easily have been more seriously injured or even killed.”

And in August, a woman in Hull suffered a skull fracture after being hit by an e-scooter while riding her bicycle down a one-way street.

Such is the danger of electric scooters, Transport for London (TfL) bosses banned them in December 2021, after one exploded on a packed tube.

Firefighters extinguished a blaze at Parsons Green tube station in which a passenger suffered smoke inhalation.

It was one of many close calls that caused TfL to launch an urgent review, supported by evidence from the brigade’s experts.

E-Scooters Were Also Banned From Tfl In December 2021, After One Exploded On A Packaged Tube

E-Scooters Were Also Banned From Tfl In December 2021, After One Exploded On A Packaged Tube

E-scooters were also banned from TfL in December 2021, after one exploded on a packaged tube

The latest government figures showed that 346 of the accidents involved just one e-scooter with no other vehicles involved – a sharp increase from the 200 the year before.

There were also 1,437 injuries from the e-scooter accidents, compared to 1,033 in the year ending June 2021.

Of all victims, 1,095 were e-scooter users, compared to 811 in the previous year. And 429 were seriously injured.

In July, 80-year-old grandmother Sarah Carter suffered a broken wrist, cracked jaw and cheekbone after being knocked to the ground by an e-scooter.

Government guidelines state that there is no separate law for the use of ‘power transporters’, such as e-scooters, meaning they are subject to the same laws as motor vehicles.

Users require at least a provisional driver’s license and it is illegal to use it on sidewalks and sidewalks and to use a cell phone while driving. It is also illegal to use them on public roads without insurance.

It is still illegal to use private e-scooters on the road, although legislation is expected to be passed next year to allow their use. B

What are the laws on e-scooters?

Renting an e-scooter is currently the only way to legally drive the vehicle on some public roads or other public places.

But the controversial vehicles could be approved for use across the UK after a trial period. Currently, 10 London boroughs are taking part in the three-provider program to test how e-scooters work on the capital’s roads.

However, riding e-scooters on the curb is prohibited and riders must be 18 years or older and have a full or provisional driver’s license to rent one.

It is also illegal to use private e-scooters or other motorized means of transportation on public roads.

Relevant laws regarding the use of e-scooters include:

On public roads, anyone using a private e-scooter or other motorized transportation is likely to commit at least one of a number of offenses, such as operating a motor vehicle without insurance. You could be held liable for a fixed fine of £300 and six points on your driving licence

On sidewalks it is generally an offense to operate a motor vehicle, and this applies to e-scooters and motorized transporters at all times

E-scooters and motorized transporters may be used on private property with the permission of the landowner or resident

E-scooters hired through the TfL program are allowed to travel on London’s public roads and cycling infrastructure in participating boroughs.

These boroughs will designate no-go areas where e-scooters cannot be ridden and will come to a safe stop, as well as go-slow areas, where the speed of e-scooters will be reduced to 8 mph

Source: TfL

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Jacky

The author of what'snew2day.com is dedicated to keeping you up-to-date on the latest news and information.

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