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The driver of a Dutch van responsible for smuggling 200 kilos of coke and heroin is sentenced to 16 years in prison

A Dutch van driver has been jailed for 16 years after he was caught trying to smuggle 200 kilos of coke and heroin into the UK, a street value of more than £12m.

Abraham Schrier, 61, from Goes in the Netherlands, concealed the Class A drugs by hiding them in the side of a white Renault Master van that was headed through the Channel Tunnel.

Belgium registered van stopped before boarding a train from France to the UK at the Channel Tunnel Terminal on Friday June 10, 2022.

In total, 74 kilos of heroin and 128 kilos of cocaine were found. Forensic experts believe he would have had a street value in Britain of more than £12 million, the National Crime Agency said.

Abraham Schrier, 61, pictured, stashed £12 million worth of cocaine and heroin by hiding them in the side of a white Renault Master van that was making its way through the Channel Tunnel from France to the UK. He was jailed for 16 years after a jury at Canterbury Crown Court found him guilty.

In Total, 74 Kilos Of Heroin And 128 Kilos Of Cocaine Were Found.  Forensic Experts Believed He Would Have Had A Street Value In Britain Of More Than £12 Million, The National Crime Agency Said.

In total, 74 kilos of heroin and 128 kilos of cocaine were found. Forensic experts believed he would have had a street value in Britain of more than £12 million, the National Crime Agency said.

On Wednesday December 21, 2022 at Canterbury Crown Court, Schrier was jailed for 16 years after a jury found him guilty.

Marius Verschueren, 69, the driver of the van, told Border Force officers that he was heading to Ashford, Kent, and would stay one night and then return.

But NCA officers were called to investigate after a search found packages of heroin and cocaine concealed in the vehicle’s side panels.

Verschueren, from the Borgerhout area of ​​Antwerp in Belgium, and the driver of the first van, was found not guilty by the jury.

Just half an hour later, a second van, driven by Schrier, pulled up at the same spot, also saying it was going to Ashford for one night.

Marius Verschueren, 69, The Driver Of The Van, Told Border Force Officers That He Was Heading To Ashford, Kent, And Would Stay One Night And Then Return.

Marius Verschueren, 69, the driver of the van, told Border Force officers that he was heading to Ashford, Kent, and would stay one night and then return.

Nca Officers Were Called To Investigate After A Search Found Packages Of Heroin And Cocaine Concealed In The Vehicle'S Side Panels.

NCA officers were called to investigate after a search found packages of heroin and cocaine concealed in the vehicle’s side panels.

Verschueren, From The Borgerhout Area Of ​​Antwerp In Belgium, And The Driver Of The First Van, Was Found Not Guilty By The Jury.

Verschueren, from the Borgerhout area of ​​Antwerp in Belgium, and the driver of the first van, was found not guilty by the jury.

Mark Howes Added:

Mark Howes added: “Schrier may have been one step away from those gangs, but his part shouldn’t diminish.”

Mark Howes, Nca Dover Branch Commander, Said After The Sentencing Hearing:

Mark Howes, NCA Dover branch commander, said after the sentencing hearing: “This was a significant seizure of Class A drugs that would have ended up in the hands of the type of street gangs that directly engage in violence and exploitation in our communities”.

No drugs were found in his vehicle, but a power drill set, plug and bolts were found to match those found on the panels of the first van, proving he had been involved in concealing the drugs, the police said. policeman.

Schrier initially denied this when questioned by detectives, but was charged with importing Class A drugs.

Mark Howes, NCA Dover branch commander, said after the sentencing hearing: “The evidence we were able to provide showed that Schrier was a key component in this importation.”

“This was a major seizure of Class A drugs that would have ended up in the hands of the type of street gangs that directly engage in violence and exploitation in our communities.

Half An Hour Later, A Second Van, Driven By Schrier, Pulled Up At The Same Spot, Also Saying It Was Going To Ashford For One Night.

Half an hour later, a second van, driven by Schrier, pulled up at the same spot, also saying it was going to Ashford for one night.

No Drugs Were Found In His Vehicle, But A Power Drill Set, Plug And Bolts Were Found To Match Those Found On The Panels Of The First Van, Proving He Had Been Involved In Concealing The Drugs, The Police Said. Policeman.

No drugs were found in his vehicle, but a power drill set, plug and bolts were found to match those found on the panels of the first van, proving he had been involved in concealing the drugs, the police said. policeman.

Schrier may have been one step away from those gangs, but his part shouldn’t diminish.

“Couriers like him are vital to the business model of organized crime networks involved in international drug trafficking.

“It is the NCA’s job to attack and disrupt these upstream networks, and working with partners like the Border Force, we are determined to do everything we can to stop them.”

Martin Coates, deputy director of the Border Force, added: “Drugs are a plague on our society, fueling the violence on the streets that communities across the UK are forced to endure.

“This seizure demonstrates the close cooperation between the Border Force and the NCA, preventing harmful substances from entering our communities and assuring the public that we will always remain committed to keeping them safe from the despicable illegal smuggling of dangerous drugs.”

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Jacky

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