The DRINKS that contain more calories than your meal

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A fitness expert has revealed the shocking caloric values ​​of some of the most popular drinks on the high street.

Graeme Tomlinson, 32, of Aberdeen, known online as online the fitness chef, took to social media to share how milkshakes and coffee can have more calories than a small meal.

When counting calories, many people will closely monitor their meals, but miss out on drinks that can mess up their healthy eating plans.

In one example, Graeme compares a Five Guys milkshake and 1002 calories to a homemade lasagna — which has fewer than 600 calories and 60 g of protein.

And while many are aware that their milkshakes are high in calories, they could be wrong to discover that high street coffee — like Starbucks venti mocha — has more calories than a burger.

Graeme Tomlinson, 32, of Aberdeen, known online as The Fitness Chef, took to social media to share how milkshakes and coffee can have more calories than a small meal.

Graeme revealed how a full-milk venti Starbucks mocha has more calories than a homemade cheeseburger

Graeme revealed how a full-milk venti Starbucks mocha has more calories than a homemade cheeseburger

On Instagram, Graeme wrote a lengthy caption explaining that people should enjoy high-calorie drinks in moderation.

In one example, he says you’ll still be hungry after a 421-calorie strawberry ice cream frostino from Costa — and a Tex-Mex chicken salad will leave you feeling more full.

“Our perception is often that eating main meals results in gaining more calories compared to drinking beverages,” he wrote.

‘That is undoubtedly because that is what it mainly does. In fact, there are significantly more combinations of foods and recipes that contain more calories than most drinks. ⁣⁣

In one example, he says you'll still be hungry after a 421-calorie strawberry ice cream frostino from Costa — and a Tex-Mex chicken salad will leave you feeling more full.

In one example, he says you’ll still be hungry after a 421-calorie strawberry ice cream frostino from Costa — and a Tex-Mex chicken salad will leave you feeling more full.

A Starbucks chocolate chip frappucino is nearly a quarter of a woman's daily allowance — while a ham and mozzarella sandwich has just 432 calories

A Starbucks chocolate chip frappucino is nearly a quarter of a woman’s daily allowance — while a ham and mozzarella sandwich has just 432 calories

In fact, if it’s infrequent, consuming 1002 calories from a milkshake, or 400-500 calories from a coffee-based drink, is likely to fit any dietary requirement.

“But if consumption is frequent, each episode accounts for large portions of total daily energy intake, which is likely to increase overall caloric intake over time once food is also consumed.” Such drinks can also accompany hypercaloric fast food

The chef, who has amassed more than 950,000 followers online, often shares helpful infographics to combat the food culture with simple evidence.

Caffe Nero's espresso and caramel frappe creme is a whopping 503 calories, more than a hearty dinner of chicken arrabbaita with 498 calories

Caffe Nero’s espresso and caramel frappe creme is a whopping 503 calories, more than a hearty dinner of chicken arrabbaita with 498 calories

Those indulging in a large McDonald's banana milkshake will consume 495 calories, while a bowl of coconut chocolate oats has just 408 calories and 21g of protein.

Those indulging in a large McDonald’s banana milkshake will consume 495 calories, while a bowl of coconut chocolate oats has just 408 calories and 21g of protein.

Last year, he took to social media to share that foods are often not as healthy as they seem.

In one example, he highlighted Weight Watchers bread, which is 102 calories per 40 g, compared to regular Tesco bread, which has 95 calories per 40 g, and a third the price.

In another example, he showed how an Innocent smoothie has more calories than a bottle of Coke and almost as much sugar, while Weight Watchers chocolate chip cookies have just nine calories less than McVities’s and their ready meals contain more calories. .

Graeme Tomlinson, 32, of Aberdeen, known online as The Fitness Chef, took to social media to share how foods are often not as healthy as they seem.  In one example, he highlights Weight Watchers bread, which is 102 calories per 40 g, compared to regular Tesco bread, which has 95 calories per 40 g, and a third the price.

Graeme Tomlinson, 32, of Aberdeen, known online as The Fitness Chef, took to social media to share how foods are often not as healthy as they seem. In one example, he highlights Weight Watchers bread, which is 102 calories per 40 g, compared to regular Tesco bread, which has 95 calories per 40 g, and a third the price.

In an infographic, he uses the example of a Weight Watcher Penne Bologenese ready meal and compares it to Tesco's Spaghetti Bolognese.

In an infographic, he uses the example of a Weight Watcher Penne Bologenese ready meal and compares it to Tesco’s Spaghetti Bolognese.

Why you SHOULD NOT rely on calorie counting if you want to lose weight, according to a nutritionist

In an exclusive conversation with Femail, award-winning nutritionist Kate Llewellyn-Waters previously warned against being careful about calorie counting, and it’s important to make sure dieters are getting enough nutrients when trying to lose weight.

She said: “There is a growing body of research that has shown that if our microbiome (our gut bacteria and its genes, now known as the ‘second brain’) has a low number of bacteria and certain species are not abundant, this can make us hungrier and then we take in more calories from the food we eat.

“So even if processed foods such as soft drinks, cold cuts, ‘diet’ foods contain the same amount of calories as whole foods (such as an apple or a free-range egg), they actually allow us to consume more calories compared to a whole food.”

‘Sugar, processed meat, soda and alcohol all alter the balance of bacteria in our guts. And we need positive gut health for many reasons, including successful weight management.

‘Every person has a different composition of gut bacteria, which is completely personalized and differs from person to person. And studies have shown that obese individuals have a lower number of different types in their gut compared to normal-weight and non-obese individuals.

‘Also, a greater diversity of different bacterial species in our gut is associated with achieving and, more importantly, maintaining a healthy weight, and this is strongly influenced by what we eat. So the foods we eat, as you can see, are very important for successful long-term weight management.”

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