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British Airways had to cancel almost 100 percent of its flights at London Heathrow yesterday, leaving the terminals (such as HEathrow Terminal 5 in the photo) abandoned
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The disruption of British Airways flights will continue even after the two-day strike ended on Wednesday, as almost half of the airline's pilots and aircraft are in the wrong place.

Nearly 195,000 passengers had submerged their travel plans in chaos after pilots first went on a two-day strike on Monday in the 100-year history of the British flagship.

Members of the British Airline Pilots & # 39; Association (Balpa) said that its members strongly supported the strike, canceling more than 1,700 flights during the two days.

But passengers can expect even more delays and confusion when the strike ends on Wednesday after BA said that almost half of the airline's fleet is in the wrong place.

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British Airways had to cancel almost 100 percent of its flights at London Heathrow yesterday, leaving the terminals (such as HEathrow Terminal 5 in the photo) abandoned

British Airways had to cancel almost 100 percent of its flights at London Heathrow yesterday, leaving the terminals (such as HEathrow Terminal 5 in the photo) abandoned

An image made today of FlightRadar24 does not show British Airways flights worldwide. Today only a few flights are scheduled to take off from Gatwick and Heathrow

An image made today of FlightRadar24 does not show British Airways flights worldwide. Today only a few flights are scheduled to take off from Gatwick and Heathrow

An image made today of FlightRadar24 does not show British Airways flights worldwide. Today only a few flights are scheduled to take off from Gatwick and Heathrow

An empty lounge at Heathrow Terminal Five yesterday morning after the strike action started

An empty lounge at Heathrow Terminal Five yesterday morning after the strike action started

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An empty lounge at Heathrow Terminal Five yesterday morning after the strike action started

A spokesperson said: “We are very sorry for the disruption caused by Balpa's industrial action among our customers.

& # 39; We are doing everything we can to get back to normal and bring our customers to their destination. & # 39;

How BA passengers could experience more chaos during Christmas

Passengers from British Airways can have more pilot attacks during the Christmas period as part of a long-term chaos campaign.

The Balpa Union said that BA's failure to meet its requirements during the long-term dispute could lead to a & # 39; harmful escalation & # 39 ;.

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Balpa said his members – including captains who paid £ 167,000 on average – are willing to take part in further strikes until his mandate for action ends in January.

With a new strike scheduled for September 27, Balpa said yesterday: & # 39; with our vote we can take action at any time. & # 39;

Higher-earning pilots have reportedly talked about continuing months of industrial action through crowd-funding among themselves to help fewer senior members.

Strikes during the hectic Christmas holiday period would be enormously problematic for the airline.

Regarding the likely impact on Wednesday, BA said: & # 39; Because of the union strike action, nearly half of our fleet of more than 300 planes and more than 700 pilots will start the day in the wrong place.

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& # 39; In addition, more than 4,000 cabin crew have disrupted their schedules and in many cases are unable to operate for several days due to legal rest requirements.

& # 39; Each individual flight movement must also take into account detailed planning, including technical checks, maintenance, catering, refueling, baggage loading, cargo and cleaning. & # 39;

Planes were again grounded on Tuesday, with only a few BA flights scheduled from Gatwick and Heathrow.

Long-haul flights will resume after midnight to places like Dubai and New York when the strike ends.

The union is still planning a new 24-hour strike on September 27 unless the jammed line has been resolved.

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Balpa said the strike cost BA £ 40 million a day.

Striking pilots also calculate the costs after they have been stripped of their travel expenses for the next three years.

Cockpit crew has reportedly lost access to the 90 percent discount on every flight that will also affect their family and friends who have benefited from the deal.

They will also not be able to use & # 39; hotline bookings & # 39; confirming flights with a discount in a movement that costs them tens of thousands of pounds.

The arrivals hall at Terminal Five at Heathrow Airport, London, on day one of the very first strike by British Airways pilots

The arrivals hall at Terminal Five at Heathrow Airport, London, on day one of the very first strike by British Airways pilots

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The arrivals hall at Terminal Five at Heathrow Airport, London, on day one of the very first strike by British Airways pilots

British Airways aircraft parked at the Engineering Base at Heathrow Airport yesterday morning

British Airways aircraft parked at the Engineering Base at Heathrow Airport yesterday morning

British Airways aircraft parked at the Engineering Base at Heathrow Airport yesterday morning

The biggest hit will be the crew living abroad and using the benefits of commuting from work to Heathrow or Gatwick.

Which travel benefits do BA pilots receive?

All BA employees benefit from & # 39; Fly the World & # 39; staff travel.

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The BA website explains that from day one, staff can purchase discounted commercial tickets, also known as & # 39; Hotline & # 39; tickets, for staff or for friends and family.

After what BA describes as an & # 39; eligible period & # 39; Employees are eligible for unlimited standby and premium standby rates on the entire BA network and other partner airlines.

Some discounts can be as high as 90 percent.

After five years, employees are eligible for one concession per year for them and their friends and family, all they have to do is pay taxes and fees.

In the current dispute, BA has offered a pay increase of 11.5% over three years, which is said to increase the salary of some captains to £ 200,000, but Balpa says his members want a larger share in the company's profits .

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BA has spent weeks offering passengers refunds or the option to book on a different travel date or airline.

Both parties have said they want to resume the talks, but there is little sign that the deadlock has been broken.

Balpa said the strikes were a & # 39; powerful demonstration & # 39; had been the power of the feeling of BA pilots, and encouraged the airline to return to the negotiating table with a few & # 39; meaningful proposals & # 39; to try to prevent the next scheduled strike.

A trade union statement states: & # 39; Should British Airways refuse meaningful negotiations, Balpa's national executive team will consider further strike dates. & # 39;

General Secretary Brian Strutton said: & # 39; Of course any reasonable employer would listen to such a clear message, stop threatening and bullying and start working on finding a solution. & # 39;

Why did BA pilots go on strike?

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British Airways canceled most flights due to the first strike ever by its pilots.

Question: Who is on strike?

A: Members of the British Airline Pilots Association (Balpa), which represents the majority of BA pilots.

Question: What is the dispute about?

A payment. Balpa says his members want more of a share of BA's profit.

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Question: How many are they offered?

A: BA offers a pay increase of 11.5% over three years, which has been accepted by trade unions representing other BA employees.

Question: How many flights have been canceled due to the strike?

A: BA said that more than 1,700 flights were canceled on Monday and Tuesday.

Question: How many passengers have been affected?

A: Approximately 195,000 people would have flown with BA for two days.

Question: Has BA received many telephone calls from passengers?

A: BA says it has expanded its customer relationship teams since the strike dates were announced last month and received 111,000 tweets and nearly 400,000 calls per day.

Question: What alternative arrangements has BA made?

A: Tens of thousands of people have had refunds or rebooked flights with BA or with other airlines.

Question: Are more strikes planned?

A: Balpa has announced a 24-hour suspension on September 27 if the dispute remains unresolved.

Question: How much do BA pilots earn?

A: BA says that after three years, his payment offer will bring some captains to more than £ 200,000 a year. Balpa says that £ 100,000 is a more typical basic wage.

Question: Are conversations planned between the two parties?

A: Not at the moment. Meetings have been held in recent weeks, but these have not broken the deadlock.

Question: Are BA's industrial relationships in poor condition?

A: There have been disputes over the years, but the relationships were good until the row of pilots flared up.

Question: How much do the strikes cost BA?

A: Balpa says that BA costs £ 40 million every day and claims that settling the dispute would cost £ 5 million.

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