The director of FEMA receives the name of Hurricane Florence WRONG in an emergency briefing to deny the abuse of the car

FEMA chief Brock Long began a briefing on the threats posed by Hurricane Florence by addressing questions about an inspector general's investigation into the use of government vehicles.

FEMA chief Brock Long on Thursday thwarted the name of the hurricane that threatened the East Coast while denying accusations of his own misuse of government cars, saying he was "100% concentrated" in the storm.

"Regardless of an article, I am currently 100% focused on Floyd, and that is exactly where our attention should be with the safety mission of life," Long told an emergency conference to inform Americans about the hurricane. Florence.

"Florence, sorry," he added later.

Long may have been referring to a 1999 hurricane that shook the east coast.

FEMA chief Brock Long began a briefing on the threats posed by Hurricane Florence by addressing questions about an inspector general's investigation into the use of government vehicles.

FEMA chief Brock Long began a briefing on the threats posed by Hurricane Florence by addressing questions about an inspector general's investigation into the use of government vehicles.

He denied the distraction at the top of an informational session in which officials instructed Americans on what basic needs they should take to shelters, where and how to evacuate, and what disabled citizens should do to prepare.

He said he followed the policies in accordance with the regulation and that, in short, we will continue to cooperate fully with any investigation that continues and we acknowledge any mistakes, move forward and move forward, and keep moving forward. "

"Regardless of an article, I am currently 100% focused on Floyd and that is exactly where our focus should be on the safety of life mission, we will invite our federal partners: Florence, excuse me," he said. possibly after being corrected.

Asked if he trusted to follow the law, Long changed the subject to the storm:

He repeated the error, trying to change the subject back to the storm. "We're going to get to Floyd, we're going to get to Florence, excuse me, and we're going to concentrate on life safety issues." he said.

"I'm 100% focused on Floyd," said FEMA chief Brock Long, confusing the name of Hurricane Florence as he answered questions about his alleged misuse of government vehicles.

President Donald Trump listens as FEMA administrator Brock Long speaks during a meeting with National Security Secretary and long Kirstjen Nielsen in the Oval Office on September 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

President Donald Trump listens as FEMA administrator Brock Long speaks during a meeting with National Security Secretary and long Kirstjen Nielsen in the Oval Office on September 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

President Donald Trump listens as FEMA administrator Brock Long speaks during a meeting with National Security Secretary and long Kirstjen Nielsen in the Oval Office on September 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

A report said that FEMA administrator Brock Long clashed with National Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen over the use of the car

A report said that FEMA administrator Brock Long clashed with National Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen over the use of the car

A report said that FEMA administrator Brock Long clashed with National Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen over the use of the car

The embarrassing embarrassment arose when Long rejected a new report from Politico that was under investigation for the use of government cars.

The report says he clashed with National Security chief Kirstjen Nielsen on the issue. An Inspector General is testing his use of a government Chevy Suburban and other vehicles during repeated six-hour trips to Hickory, N.C.

His use of a staff driver began last year, and attendees would stay in hotels at the expense of the government, an official told the publication.

DEVASTATION: Marine One carrying United States President Bill Clinton along with North Carolina Governor James Hunt on September 20, 1999, inspecting flood damage in Tarboro, North Carolina, which was damaged by high winds and the rain of Hurricane Floyd. Clinton also visited emergency shelters

DEVASTATION: Marine One carrying United States President Bill Clinton along with North Carolina Governor James Hunt on September 20, 1999, inspecting flood damage in Tarboro, North Carolina, which was damaged by high winds and the rain of Hurricane Floyd. Clinton also visited emergency shelters

DEVASTATION: Marine One carrying United States President Bill Clinton along with North Carolina Governor James Hunt on September 20, 1999, inspecting flood damage in Tarboro, North Carolina, which was damaged by high winds and the rain of Hurricane Floyd. Clinton also visited emergency shelters

FIRST TOMES ROUTE 66 WEST TO THE SOUTH 81: Long, seen here talking about Hurricane Florence, is under fire for using government vehicles on the six-hour trip from Washington to Hickory, North Carolina.

FIRST TOMES ROUTE 66 WEST TO THE SOUTH 81: Long, seen here talking about Hurricane Florence, is under fire for using government vehicles on the six-hour trip from Washington to Hickory, North Carolina.

FIRST TOMES ROUTE 66 WEST TO THE SOUTH 81: Long, seen here talking about Hurricane Florence, is under fire for using government vehicles on the six-hour trip from Washington to Hickory, North Carolina.

The news about Long's use of government vehicles for long-distance travel comes after $ 10 million of FEMA funds were transferred to pay for immigration detention centers. The transfer, disclosed in documents published by Democratic Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon, showed that the funds came from the operations and support budget before the start of the hurricane season.

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