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According to Paula Norris from Brisbane (photo), there are six nutritional myths that she hears more than anyone else - and she invalidated them

When it comes to food, we are all too often told that carbohydrates are the devil and coffee is bad for you.

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But a dietitian is on a mission to be the biggest and most & # 39; ridiculous & # 39; to dispel myths about what we eat.

According to Paula Norris, from Brisbane, there are six things she regularly hears – and wishes she didn't.

What are they then?

According to Paula Norris from Brisbane (photo), there are six nutritional myths that she hears more than anyone else - and she invalidated them

According to Paula Norris from Brisbane (photo), there are six nutritional myths that she hears more than anyone else – and she invalidated them

MYTH ONE: COCONUT OIL IS HEALTHY

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& # 39; Coconut oil is not healthy & # 39 ;, Paula wrote on Instagram.

& # 39; It has been shown to increase total cholesterol and is approximately 80 percent saturated fat. & # 39;

The dietitian said that although it has been shown that this saturated fat is not as harmful as the saturated fat of meat products, you should only use it occasionally because of its & # 39; taste profile instead of health claims & # 39 ;.

SECOND MYTH: A GLUTEN-FREE DIET IS HEALTHIER

In 2019 gluten-free is almost worn with a badge of honor.

But Paula said that unless you have diagnosed celiac disease or non-celiac disease, gluten-free diets are no better for you.

& # 39; In fact, they can sometimes be devoid of fiber and some micronutrients if they are not properly planned, & # 39; she said.

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Do not give up gluten because you think it will be better for you. Simply exchange a number of shapes – such as white bread – for healthier brown or sourdough.

"Moderate portions (as for each of the macros) and choosing carbohydrates with a low GI wherever possible is beneficial for our weight and hunger levels," Paula said (stock image)

Myth three: carbohydrates become fat

We have been told since time immemorial that carbohydrates fatten up and that weight loss products should stay away.

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But Paula said this isn't our problem when it comes to weight gain – it's more calories eating than we burn.

& # 39; Moderate portions (as for each of the & # 39; s macro's) and choosing low-carb carbohydrates wherever possible is beneficial for our weight and hunger levels, & # 39; she said.

Sweet potatoes, brown rice and wholemeal bread all fall into this bracket.

MYTH FOUR: SNACKING IS BAD

Paula said that the fourth food myth she encounters a lot is the idea that snacking is bad for you and that you shouldn't enjoy it.

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& # 39; Snacking is fine, if you choose nutritious snacks, & # 39; she said.

Paula's favorites are snacks that give you all macronutrients in one – something like a boiled egg and some spinach, a handful of cashew nuts or an apple and some peanut butter.

Greek yogurt also works well to balance the hunger level.

FIVE MYTH: 5-6 FOOD SMALL MEALS IS BETTER THAN 3 GREAT PEOPLE

There is sufficient nutritional advice that claims that eating smaller meals is better for your metabolism.

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But Paula claims that it is calories in versus calories that really makes the difference.

& # 39; Although there is such a thing as & # 39; diet-induced thermogenesis & # 39 ;, which burns energy to digest a meal, its impact on total calories burned is insignificant and does not affect weight loss, & # 39; she said.

Finally, if you are stuck and think that your morning brew is bad for your teeth and waist, think again (stock image)

Finally, if you are stuck and think that your morning brew is bad for your teeth and waist, think again (stock image)

Finally, if you are stuck and think that your morning brew is bad for your teeth and waist, think again (stock image)

MYTH SIX: COFFEE IS UNHEALTHY

Finally, if you are stuck and think that your morning brew is bad for your teeth and waist, think again.

& # 39; Coffee is actually rich in antioxidants and has been shown to be protective against some chronic diseases, & # 39; Paula said.

However, she outlined that the amount of coffee that different people can tolerate differs.

So if you find yourself anxious after drinking a certain amount, you may have to cut back.

& # 39; Two cafe-like or four instant coffee is a good maximum for most of us, & # 39; Paula said.

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