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The death toll in Brazil exceeds 80,000

According to health ministry figures, Brazil’s coronavirus death toll exceeded 80,000 on Monday, as the country hit the second-heaviest in the world and continued to struggle to control the pandemic.

The figure, after the death toll in the United States, quadrupled in two months. Brazil exceeded the limit of 20,000 COVID-19 deaths on May 21.

Recently, the Latin American country with 212 million people has regularly registered more than 1,000 new deaths a day – although Monday’s figure was lower at 632, bringing the total death toll to 80,120.

The country has confirmed a total of 2.1 million infections.

According to health ministry figures, Brazil's coronavirus death toll exceeded 80,000 on Monday, as the country hit the second-heaviest in the world and continued to struggle to control the pandemic. Above hundreds of grave lots at Vila Formosa Cemetery, in the suburbs of Sao Paulo, Brazil, on July 20

According to health ministry figures, Brazil’s coronavirus death toll exceeded 80,000 on Monday, as the country hit the second-heaviest in the world and continued to struggle to control the pandemic. Above hundreds of grave lots at Vila Formosa Cemetery, in the suburbs of Sao Paulo, Brazil, on July 20

The death toll in Brazil, the second after the death toll in the United States, quadrupled in two months

The death toll in Brazil, the second after the death toll in the United States, quadrupled in two months

The death toll in Brazil, the second after the death toll in the United States, quadrupled in two months

The country has confirmed a total of 2.1 million infections. Experts say that too little testing means the actual numbers are likely to be much higher

The country has confirmed a total of 2.1 million infections. Experts say that too little testing means the actual numbers are likely to be much higher

The country has confirmed a total of 2.1 million infections. Experts say that too little testing means the actual numbers are likely to be much higher

Self-infected President Jair Bolsonaro is criticized for downplaying the virus and urging governors to reopen their economies, despite recommendations from health officials. Upstairs, Bolsonaro attends a flag-lowering ceremony on July 20 at Alvorada Palace in Brasilia

Self-infected President Jair Bolsonaro is criticized for downplaying the virus and urging governors to reopen their economies, despite recommendations from health officials. Upstairs, Bolsonaro attends a flag-lowering ceremony on July 20 at Alvorada Palace in Brasilia

Self-infected President Jair Bolsonaro is criticized for downplaying the virus and urging governors to reopen their economies, despite recommendations from health officials. Upstairs, Bolsonaro attends a flag-lowering ceremony on July 20 at Alvorada Palace in Brasilia

Experts say that too little testing means the actual numbers are likely to be much higher.

Mass graves are prepared to deal with the growing number of coronavirus outbreak victims in the country, including the Vila Formosa Cemetery in Sao Paulo, the largest in Latin America.

Self-infected President Jair Bolsonaro is criticized for downplaying the virus and urging governors to reopen their economies, despite recommendations from health officials.

The far-right leader is currently in quarantine, along with several infected members of his cabinet. But he previously contradicted the government’s stay-at-home measures, which he argues could have more damaging economic impact than the virus itself.

Bolsonaro, who famously compared the virus to a “little flu,” regularly took to the streets without a face mask until he became infected, shook hands, and took pictures with supporters at rallies.

Graves at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida Cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, on July 2. Mass graves are prepared to deal with the growing number of victims of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, including the Vila Formosa Cemetery in Sao Paulo, the largest in Latin America

Graves at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida Cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, on July 2. Mass graves are prepared to deal with the growing number of victims of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, including the Vila Formosa Cemetery in Sao Paulo, the largest in Latin America

Graves at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida Cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, on July 2. Mass graves are prepared to deal with the growing number of victims of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, including the Vila Formosa Cemetery in Sao Paulo, the largest in Latin America

The far-right leader is currently in quarantine, along with several infected members of his cabinet. But he previously contradicted the government's stay-at-home measures, which he argues could have more damaging economic impact than the virus itself. Graves above on the cemetery Nossa Senhora Aparecida

The far-right leader is currently in quarantine, along with several infected members of his cabinet. But he previously contradicted the government's stay-at-home measures, which he argues could have more damaging economic impact than the virus itself. Graves above on the cemetery Nossa Senhora Aparecida

The far-right leader is currently in quarantine, along with several infected members of his cabinet. But he previously contradicted the government’s stay-at-home measures, which he argues could have more damaging economic impact than the virus itself. Graves above on the cemetery Nossa Senhora Aparecida

Graves in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus. Brazil increased its record number of coronavirus deaths to 80,000 as the pandemic that swept the world hit Brazil with full force

Graves in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus. Brazil increased its record number of coronavirus deaths to 80,000 as the pandemic that swept the world hit Brazil with full force

Graves in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus. Brazil increased its record number of coronavirus deaths to 80,000 as the pandemic that swept the world hit Brazil with full force

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19, wears a protective face mask while making a heart sign to supporters at a ceremony to withdraw the Brazilian flag from his official residence, Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, on Monday

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19, wears a protective face mask while creating a supporter at a retreat ceremony with the Brazilian flag outside his official residence, Alvorada Palace in Brasilia, on Monday

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19, wears a protective face mask while creating a supporter at a retreat ceremony with the Brazilian flag outside his official residence, Alvorada Palace in Brasilia, on Monday

Like U.S. President Donald Trump, whom he admires, Bolsonaro, 65, cites the anti-malarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as promising treatments and takes the latter himself, despite a lack of evidence of their effectiveness against COVID-19.

The World Health Organization said on Friday that the outbreak in Brazil finally appears to have reached a plateau.

There is now “an opportunity for Brazil … to suppress the transmission of the virus,” said Michael Ryan, head of the health emergency, and urged the country to “take control.”

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, right, infected with COVID-19, wears protective face mask as he waves supporters at a ceremony to withdraw the Brazilian flag from his official residence, the Alvorada Palace

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, right, infected with COVID-19, wears protective face mask as he waves supporters at a ceremony to withdraw the Brazilian flag from his official residence, the Alvorada Palace

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, right, infected with COVID-19, wears protective face mask as he waves supporters at a ceremony to withdraw the Brazilian flag from his official residence, the Alvorada Palace

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19 and wearing a protective face mask, walks to a retreat ceremony with the Brazilian flag outside his official residence, Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, July 20

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19 and wearing a protective face mask, walks to a retreat ceremony with the Brazilian flag outside his official residence, Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, July 20

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, infected with COVID-19 and wearing a protective face mask, walks to a retreat ceremony with the Brazilian flag outside his official residence, Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, July 20

Aerial view with graves at Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus on July 20. Brazil recorded an average of more than 1,040 new deaths and 33,000 new infections per day in the past week

Aerial view with graves at Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus on July 20. Brazil recorded an average of more than 1,040 new deaths and 33,000 new infections per day in the past week

Aerial view with graves at Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus on July 20. Brazil recorded an average of more than 1,040 new deaths and 33,000 new infections per day in the past week

But while the number of daily deaths and infections has stabilized, it remains high.

Brazil recorded an average of more than 1,040 new deaths and 33,000 new infections per day in the past week.

“The WHO is talking about a plateau … but the problem is that the level remains very high and will remain so for a long time,” said Mauro Sanchez, epidemiologist at the University of Brasilia.

Getting control “depends on what we do in terms of public policy and whether people are following it,” he told AFP.

Only the United States has more infections and deaths than Brazil in the pandemic, at 3.8 million and 140,811, respectively.

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