Tourists continue to flock to an abandoned mine in Western Australia (photo), even though the city is so heavily polluted with asbestos that thousands of people have died

The creepy ghost town tourists refuse to stop visiting – even though 2000 people have died there and the air is so toxic that you can only breathe

  • Despite health warnings, tourists flocked to Wittenoom in Western Australia
  • The city has been taken off the map because of deadly high asbestos levels in the air
  • Families and groups of friends are depicted in the former mining town
  • & # 39; Extreme tourists & # 39; are seen posing with dilapidated cafes and abandoned houses
  • Minister of State Ben Wyatt said that there were & # 39; fatal consequences & # 39; were for the visit

Authorities are begging tourists to stay out of a city in Western Australia, saying that only inhaling the air there could kill you.

Wittenoom was removed from the map and disconnected from the electricity grid after large amounts of asbestos in the air caused the deaths of thousands of miners.

Despite warning signs placed everywhere, tourists still flock en masse to Wittenoom, a former mining town about 300 km inland from Port Hedland.

In a form of & # 39; extreme tourism & # 39; attract visitors en masse to Wittenoom to photograph the dilapidated Doc Holiday & # 39; s Cafe, the jewelry store with a collapsed roof, abandoned cars & houses and the bare land where it all sits.

Tourists continue to flock to an abandoned mine in Western Australia (photo), even though the city is so heavily polluted with asbestos that thousands of people have died

Tourists continue to flock to an abandoned mine in Western Australia (photo), even though the city is so heavily polluted with asbestos that thousands of people have died

Wittenoom has been removed from maps and disconnected from the electricity grid, but challenging tourists continue to visit

Wittenoom has been removed from maps and disconnected from the electricity grid, but challenging tourists continue to visit

Wittenoom has been removed from maps and disconnected from the electricity grid, but challenging tourists continue to visit

Wittenoom was abandoned after the asbestos mine closed in 1966, leaving behind 3 million tons of residue

Wittenoom was abandoned after the asbestos mine closed in 1966, leaving behind 3 million tons of residue

Houses were abandoned with possessions that are still in it (photo)

Houses were abandoned with possessions that are still in it (photo)

The city was abandoned after the asbestos mine closed in 1966, leaving behind 3 million tons of residue

Warning signs surround the city, but those desperate for an Instagram recording do not seem to pay attention

Warning signs surround the city, but those desperate for an Instagram recording do not seem to pay attention

Warning signs surround the city, but those desperate for an Instagram recording do not seem to pay attention

The photos show families on vacation, groups of friends camping, and tourists swimming in a nearby lake – sometimes with their pets.

Many also share photos of the warning sign advising them not to enter.

Most do not mention the deadly contaminants in the air in their captions, or do not refer the problem at all.

Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Lands Ben Wyatt told Nine honey there was still a terrifying amount of asbestos in the air and the city would never be safe to visit.

Ironically, the warnings, indicating the high levels of asbestos in the air, can cause cancer or lung disease, which is common on Instagram shots of the area

Ironically, the warnings, indicating the high levels of asbestos in the air, can cause cancer or lung disease, which is common on Instagram shots of the area

Ironically, the warnings, indicating the high levels of asbestos in the air, can cause cancer or lung disease, which is common on Instagram shots of the area

The former mining town is popular with & # 39; extreme tourists & # 39 ;, who travel to physically dangerous places for a kick

The former mining town is popular with & # 39; extreme tourists & # 39 ;, who travel to physically dangerous places for a kick

The former mining town is popular with & # 39; extreme tourists & # 39 ;, who travel to physically dangerous places for a kick

He said that when the Wittenoom mine was closed in 1966, three million tons of asbestos residue – known as residues – remained in the gorge and the surrounding area.

& # 39; Exposure to a single fiber of these residues could be fatal & he said.

Mr. Wyatt said that no amount of money or time would allow the city to be cleaned to a point that it would be acceptable for human habitation.

& # 39; I have a simple message for someone who is thinking of traveling to Wittenoom. Don't, & he said.

& # 39; These warning signs are not for decoration or to add your Instagram collection. They are serious warnings of serious health consequences.

& # 39; I cannot emphasize enough that it is very foolish to travel to Wittenoom. There are many gaps in WA that do not entail the threat of fatal consequences. & # 39;

One man is seen posing in front of the sign on the outskirts of the city, warning of the dangers inside

One man is seen posing in front of the sign on the outskirts of the city, warning of the dangers inside

One man is seen posing in front of the sign on the outskirts of the city, warning of the dangers inside

This couple signed their image & # 39; rolling in the blue & # 39 ;, which may be a reference to the blue asbestos mined in Wittenoom

This couple signed their image & # 39; rolling in the blue & # 39 ;, which may be a reference to the blue asbestos mined in Wittenoom

This couple signed their image & # 39; rolling in the blue & # 39 ;, which may be a reference to the blue asbestos mined in Wittenoom

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