The crazy moment The Utah wildlife agency takes fish out of an AIRCRAFT to repopulate the mountain lakes

A wildlife agency in Utah uses an airplane to store mountain lakes with fish, as shown in this picture

A wildlife agency in Utah released a crazy video of them storing a lake by flying small trout from the bottom of an airplane into the blue waters.

The Utah Wildlife Resources Division shared the video to show how they get fish in the mountain lakes. In the images, a plane is seen flying over the lake while water and small fish come out of a hole in the bottom of the plane.

"Fun fact: we store many of Utah's high mountain lakes from the air," read a tweet. "The fish are small, between 1 and 3 inches long, which allows more than 95% of them to survive the fall."

Worried Twitter users flooded the video with comments about the potential danger it places the fish in, but the wildlife agency said it was the fastest and safest option.

A wildlife agency in Utah uses an airplane to store mountain lakes with fish, as shown in this picture

A wildlife agency in Utah uses an airplane to store mountain lakes with fish, as shown in this picture

Airplanes are used to store mountain lakes when it is difficult to reach them by truck or on foot

Airplanes are used to store mountain lakes when it is difficult to reach them by truck or on foot

Airplanes are used to store mountain lakes when it is difficult to reach them by truck or on foot

"Because the fish are small, they easily survive their aerial fall without injury or damage," an official responded to a user.

In a Facebook post, the agency explained why it does not transport fish by land, as they used to do in the past.

"We used to load fish into metal milk cans," the agency said, "and we needed horses to take us to these remote areas, the aerial storage method is much faster and less stressful for the fish."

They added: "Think of it as a tall diver who plunges into a deep well of water."

In a blog post in 2017, the agency said it has been using airplanes to store mountain lakes since the 1950s.

For the lakes and streams that are easiest to reach and are next to the roads, they will transport the trout using trucks with containment tanks, horses or even men carrying heavy backpacks full of water and fish.

Authorities said it is safer to do it by land and between 95 and 99 percent of the trout survive the fall

Authorities said it is safer to do it by land and between 95 and 99 percent of the trout survive the fall

Authorities said it is safer to do it by land and between 95 and 99 percent of the trout survive the fall

Officials said it is the safest option and 95 percent of the fish survive the drop in the water because they are very small

Officials said it is the safest option and 95 percent of the fish survive the drop in the water because they are very small

Officials said it is the safest option and 95 percent of the fish survive the drop in the water because they are very small

"Depending on the area and the condition of the roads or trails, the fish are also transported to remote areas on foot with buckets or a backpack, or in a four-wheeled vehicle.Horses are still sometimes used to carry fish to hard to reach places, "the agency said.

While the preferred method by the state to store mountain lakes may seem strange to some, it is not the only area that uses airplanes.

A spokesman for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks told the Great Falls Tribune that many mountain states with remote lakes use that method.

& # 39; We have done it over the years. It is a step forward of decades and decades ago, when they took fry in milk cans and tied the ropes, "said the spokesman.

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