The convicted murderer says that the laws of NSW Strike Force Raptor make having a social life impossible

The member of the life of the nomads and former president Mouhamed & # 39; Moudi & # 39; Tajjour (pictured) says the anti-bikie laws of New South Wales are

A life member of the notorious gang of nomadic motorcyclists says that strict anti-bikie laws have prevented him from having a social life.

The convicted murderer and life member of the nomads, Mouhamed & # 39; Moudi & # 39; Tajjour, 34, on Friday published a scathing assessment of NSW's anti-conspiracy laws on his Instagram page.

In the caption, he said the laws made anyone "considered a mobster in the eyes of the government" a target for "police harassment."

He says that the laws, which are implemented by the NSW Strike Force Raptor, are preventing his right to freedom of expression.

The member of the life of the nomads and former president Mouhamed & # 39; Moudi & # 39; Tajjour (pictured) says the anti-bikie laws of New South Wales are "isolating" him and ruining any possibility of having a social life

In a scathing publication of Instagram (in the photo), he says he is considering moving abroad because the laws make it impossible to live freely without police harassment.

In a scathing publication of Instagram (in the photo), he says he is considering moving abroad because the laws make it impossible to live freely without police harassment.

In a scathing publication of Instagram (in the photo), he says he is considering moving abroad because the laws make it impossible to live freely without police harassment.

On the social media platform, Tajjour revealed that he was forced to tell his old friends at school that he could not reach them for a beer.

He said he was worried they might fall under the state's anti-drug laws, even if they do not have a criminal record.

"I pass people eating and chatting with each other as their classmates do and I wonder what makes them, my colleagues and I different," he wrote.

"But let's go to jail if we share a meal together."

The laws themselves keep a record of people who are related to known convicts, although he omitted some vital details in the message.

In order to press the charges, a person with at least two convicted criminals must be designated, as well as to issue a formal warning from the police.

Recently he uploaded a photo of him riding with other nomad bikers, subtitling his belief that the laws will never break his "brotherhood"

Recently he uploaded a photo of him riding with other nomad bikers, subtitling his belief that the laws will never break his "brotherhood"

Recently he uploaded a photo of him riding with other nomad bikers, subtitling his belief that the laws will never break his "brotherhood"

It was reported that the gang will go to Canberra, where there are no laws against the association

It was reported that the gang will go to Canberra, where there are no laws against the association

It was reported that the gang will go to Canberra, where there are no laws against the association

"Every time I want to see my colleagues, I have to travel to Canberra," he continued, referring to Canberra's lack of anti-Consort laws.

"It's a joke how the government can tell us who we can keep."

He put this into practice, being photographed with a nomadic leather jacket with dozens of other members in the nation's capital.

"There's no way they can get away with taking a picture like that or walking around Sydney," a New South Wales police officer told the Daily Telegraph at the time.

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