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The construction company does not report the discovery of 42 skeletons that could date from the Anglo-Saxon era

A private building contractor has been criticized for not reporting the discovery of 42 skeletons that could date back to the Anglo-Saxon era.

The skeletons, some of which had their hands tied behind their backs, were found buried in shallow graves on old farmland in Buckingham in December.

Brio Retirement Living Holdings, which plans to build 72 retirement floors on the site, commissioned an archaeological study as a condition for obtaining planning permission.

However, upon discovering the skeletons, the excavators silently removed them without informing the council, which provoked the anger of the local authorities.

"This could be a finding of such historical importance that work should stop until a complete understanding of the site is determined," said Robin Stuchbury, a Buckingham South councilor.

"It is of great historical importance to Buckingham and should not be silenced."

The site in Buckingham, Bucks, where remains of 40 bodies were found, including some with their hands tied behind their backs, buried in shallow graves

The site in Buckingham, Bucks, where remains of 40 bodies were found, including some with their hands tied behind their backs, buried in shallow graves

It is believed that the spooky remains could belong to the Danes who were executed by the Anglo-Saxons during a failed invasion in the eleventh century.

According to Stuchbury, the fact that some of the skeletons still have their hands tied behind their backs suggests that they were prisoners of war.

"We haven't seen anything of this nature in Buckingham before," Stuchbury told MailOnline.

Cking Buckingham was an Anglo-Saxon city and was on the edge of the Daneland.

"Anything with such a large number of bodies suggests to me that it could be a murder of St. Brice's Day."

The possibly momentous historical find was at a site outside of Brackley Road in Buckingham on the outskirts of the city.

The possibly momentous historical find was at a site outside of Brackley Road in Buckingham on the outskirts of the city.

The possibly momentous historical find was at a site outside of Brackley Road in Buckingham on the outskirts of the city.

Construction work has been suspended since the discovery and the developers have sent the remains to an archaeological company that will publish a report on the origin of the skeletons.

Construction work has been suspended since the discovery and the developers have sent the remains to an archaeological company that will publish a report on the origin of the skeletons.

Construction work has been suspended since the discovery and the developers have sent the remains to an archaeological company that will publish a report on the origin of the skeletons.

The St. Brice Day massacre was the murder of Danes on November 13, 1002 by order of the King of England Æthelred the Unready.

Other possibilities may be that the remains date from the English Civil War in the seventeenth century or possibly even criminals who were hanged by hanging.

Who were the Anglo-Saxons?

The Anglo-Saxons were a town that inhabited Britain since the 5th century AD. C.

They were formed by Germanic tribes who emigrated from continental Europe, as well as by British Indians who adopted their cultural practices.

The Anglo-Saxons were fierce warriors, and the tribes often fought each other for territory.

They ruled Britain from 500 years to 1066 when they were conquered by the Normans.

Stuchbury said the developers "were never very communicative" when the remains were found.

‘The fact is that we have the right to know. This is part of our story & # 39; & # 39 ;, he said.

"I am worried, and all residents are concerned about those who are interested."

Bill Chapple, a Buckinghamshire board member, also said that skeletons can be Anglo-Saxon and probably date back at least 1,000 years, but until the report arrives, the city will not know for sure.

"When we recover the carbon, we can get more information," he said.

"We don't know how they died, we don't know what gender they are, we don't know if they had diseases or the way they died."

"It's an exciting discovery, it's exciting for Buckingham."

It is believed that the skeletons could date from the Anglo-Saxon era or during the English Civil War or possibly even criminals who were hanged by hanging

Brio Retirement Living Holdings, which had been fighting since 2016 for planning permission to build on the site that currently consists of farmland and former barns, finally won an appeal last year.

The company, which is part of the real estate company Places for People, commissioned an archaeological investigation of the site as a condition for obtaining planning permission.

Places for People has not yet responded to MailOnline about whether excavation work is still taking place at the site since the bodies were removed.

The research is being conducted by the archeology firm Network Archeology, which has offices in Buckingham and Lincoln, and is in the process of writing a report.

Network Archeology did not respond to a request for comment regarding the availability of the report or when the skeleton dates.

All skeletons have now been removed, leaving only empty holes in the ground that were their graves, but the site is now secured.

Grassroots work for the new development of 72 retirement apartments on old farmland in Buckingham, Bucks, has been suspended.

Grassroots work for the new development of 72 retirement apartments on old farmland in Buckingham, Bucks, has been suspended.

Grassroots work for the new development of 72 retirement apartments on old farmland in Buckingham, Bucks, has been suspended.

The Buckinghamshire County Council told MailOnline that the post-excavation analysis is currently underway to determine who the people were and how they died.

"The analysis is a detailed and thorough process, and is expected to take a few months," the council said in a statement.

"There will definitely be an announcement once we have the experts report."

It is not known if there were artifacts buried with the bodies that could help date the moment of his death.

"The advisors were concerned about the lack of a published archaeological report, and agreed to continue seeking this from the relevant authorities," Paul Hodson, secretary of the Buckingham city council, told MailOnline.

"The council considers this finding as part of Buckingham's heritage: the history of the area is one of Buckingham's main attractions."

Where did Buckingham's bodies come from?

The 42 bodies found in shallow graves on farmland of Brackley Road in Buckingham.

The developers had been working on the site to build new retirement homes, however, the discovery halted the works.

It is possible that the bodies belonged to Danish warriors who fought against the Anglo-Saxons in the eleventh century.

In particular, the finding could be a relic of the St. Brice Day massacre, when King Æthelred the Unready ordered the murder of Danes in the Kingdom of England in November 1002.

It may be another significant dark act carried out earlier in the dispute between the Vikings in Daneland.

The remains could also have originated from those killed during the English Civil War in the 17th century or possibly from criminals who were hanged by hanging.

The skeletons discovered follow the recent discovery of the incredibly rare half-angel gold coin of the reign of Ricardo III, which is now displayed in the Old Gaol Museum in Buckingham.

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