Home Australia The Conservatives face an electoral defeat as Labor will win a majority of 416, which could see Rishi Sunak LOSE his seat and leave the Conservatives with just 39 MPs, a shocking Mail on Sunday poll reveals.

The Conservatives face an electoral defeat as Labor will win a majority of 416, which could see Rishi Sunak LOSE his seat and leave the Conservatives with just 39 MPs, a shocking Mail on Sunday poll reveals.

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The Deltapoll poll gives Sir Keir Starmer's party a 25-point lead, which would reduce the Conservatives to a group of 37 seats the size of the Liberal Democrats.

Labor is heading for a majority of 416 votes in an election result that would prove catastrophic for the Conservative Party, according to a new Mail on Sunday poll.

The Deltapoll poll gives Sir Keir Starmer’s party a 25-point lead, which would reduce the Conservatives to 37 seats, the same as the Liberal Democrats.

Even Prime Minister Rishi Sunak would lose his Yorkshire seat, despite defending a majority of more than 27,000.

The polling company carefully warns that the projection is based on a crude uniform oscillation and should be treated with caution.

However, the survey, which was carried out in part after the furor over Rishi Sunak’s early return from D-Day commemorations, highlights the scale of Sunak’s task in the run-up to the July 4 vote.

The Deltapoll poll gives Sir Keir Starmer’s party a 25-point lead, which would reduce the Conservatives to a group of 37 seats the size of the Liberal Democrats.

Even Prime Minister Rishi Sunak would lose his Yorkshire seat, despite defending a majority of more than 27,000 votes.

Even Prime Minister Rishi Sunak would lose his Yorkshire seat, despite defending a majority of more than 27,000 votes.

Mr Sunak pictured speaking to volunteers during a visit today to a community garden project in Bishop Aukland.

Mr Sunak pictured speaking to volunteers during a visit today to a community garden project in Bishop Aukland.

However, the survey, which was carried out in part after the furor over Rishi Sunak's early return from D-Day commemorations, highlights the scale of Sunak's task in the run-up to the July 4 vote.

However, the survey, which was carried out in part after the furor over Rishi Sunak’s early return from D-Day commemorations, highlights the scale of Sunak’s task in the run-up to the July 4 vote.

The poll puts Labor on 46 per cent and the Conservatives on 21 per cent, their lowest score in this Parliament. Nigel Farage’s reform stands at 12 percent.

Despite Labour’s colossal lead, it reveals some skepticism about Starmer.

When asked about the Labor leader’s insistence, during last Tuesday’s leaders’ debate, that he would not support the use of private healthcare for family members who need it, only 13 per cent of respondents agreed.

And a total of 59 per cent say they are “concerned” about the prospect of Labor raising taxes by £2,000 per household – a controversial claim made by Sunak during the debate.

Furthermore, 41 per cent believe Labor will work to reverse Brexit if they come to power; 25 percent disagree.

But only one in five (22 per cent) think Sunak should strike a deal with Nigel Farage to save the Tories.

Joe Twyman, co-founder and director of Deltapoll, said: “After a difficult few days for Rishi Sunak and the Conservative Party, Deltapoll results for today’s Mail on Sunday will make for grim reading as party support hits an all-time low. for this Parliament.

Sunak pictured shaking hands with a child today at a Conservative general election campaign event in Great Ayton

Sunak pictured shaking hands with a child today at a Conservative general election campaign event in Great Ayton

The First Minister pictured at a village party in Great Ayton, Yorkshire, today in the general election campaign

The First Minister pictured at a village party in Great Ayton, Yorkshire, today in the general election campaign

Mr Sunak pictured speaking with Hilary Bellwood during a visit to Bishop Aukland today

Mr Sunak pictured speaking with Hilary Bellwood during a visit to Bishop Aukland today

Today, Sunak apologized to veterans

Today, Sunak apologized to “disgruntled” veterans in his constituency, which contains Britain’s largest military garrison, for abandoning the D-Day anniversary early.

The launch of the party’s manifestos next week will be a crucial moment. “If that rollout doesn’t bring about a rapid and sustained change in the fortunes of Rishi Sunak specifically and the Conservatives generally, it’s hard to see what can.”

Deltapoll interviewed 2,010 British adults online between June 6 and 8, 2024. The data has been weighted to be representative of the British adult population as a whole.

Today, Sunak apologized to “disgruntled” veterans in his constituency, which contains Britain’s largest military garrison, for abandoning the D-Day anniversary early.

The under-critic Tory leader today refused to meet national media but spoke to regional newspaper The Northern Echo saying he was “deeply sorry” for the harm he had caused.

His constituents living in Catterick Garrison previously said his decision to abandon the June 6 commemoration was “disgusting”.

Mr Sunak, MP for Richmond, Yorkshire, told the Echo: “The itinerary had been set some time ago, but it was a mistake not to stay after the British events and after the engagement with British veterans, and so, I am deeply sorry.’

He added that he had had the “privilege of attending” several events in Portsmouth and France.

Catterick Garrison is the largest military garrison in Britain and had a population of around 13,000 in 2017.

It has several barracks named after historic British Army battles, many of which took place during the First World War.

The Prime Minister fell out with Sir Keir Starmer in a crucial television debate on ITV last week.

The Prime Minister fell out with Sir Keir Starmer in a crucial television debate on ITV last week.

Sunak sought to avoid a landslide that is currently expected to be even greater than that achieved by Tony Blair in 1997.

Sunak sought to avoid a landslide that is currently expected to be even greater than that achieved by Tony Blair in 1997.

The Prime Minister was also criticized by fellow Conservatives and military veterans for snubbing the final D-Day event in Normandy by flying back to London to conduct a pre-recorded interview with ITV.

A possible meeting with journalists was canceled today as the D-Day dispute continued and after his awkward exchange with broadcasters on Friday.

It came after another Cabinet minister said Sunak had made a “mistake” by skipping a major D-Day event amid Tory anger over the move.

Mark Harper said he agreed “with what the Prime Minister himself said: it was a mistake for him to leave early”, but did not go as far as his Conservative colleague Penny Mordaunt in calling the decision “completely wrong”.

Sunak was forced to apologize for leaving France ahead of an international ceremony attended by world leaders, including US President Joe Biden, to mark the 80th anniversary of the allied landing.

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