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Participants in the Bridge to Work program remove garbage along the road in Little Rock, Arkansas

The city of Arkansas pays $ 9.25 per hour – better than the minimum wage – for homeless people to get waste off the street

  • Little Rock, Arkansas, pays homeless people $ 9.25 to pick up litter
  • The city has spent $ 80,000 on the homeless program in five months
  • The mayor now proposes to extend the project until September 2020
  • Up to now 1,832 hours have been put in and 2,056 bags of waste have been cleared
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Homeless people receive $ 9.25 per hour, more than the minimum wage, to collect garbage in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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The city's Bridge to Work program started in April and pays the oppressed to remove waste and wants to put their lives back on track.

It was initially a six-month trial, but now Mayor Frank Scott Jr., impressed by the results, wants to extend it until September 2020.

Managed by the Canvas Community Church, the city spent $ 80,000 on the plan.

Participants in the Bridge to Work program remove garbage along the road in Little Rock, Arkansas

Participants in the Bridge to Work program remove garbage along the road in Little Rock, Arkansas

Homeless people receive $ 9.25 per hour to collect waste - so far, the city's new plan has cost $ 80,000
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Homeless people receive $ 9.25 per hour to collect waste - so far, the city's new plan has cost $ 80,000

Homeless people receive $ 9.25 per hour to collect waste – so far, the city's new plan has cost $ 80,000

Pastor Paul Atkins told 12 news now: & # 39; We are super excited about what happened and we hope to continue the momentum. & # 39;

In addition to salary expenditure, participants were also offered physical and mental health treatments, job interviews and for some even a roof over their heads.

Around 380 people signed up and they work in teams of eight, with more than 1,832 hours deployed and 2,056 bags of waste disposed of.

Around 380 people signed up and they work in teams of eight, with more than 1,832 hours deployed and 2,056 bags of waste disposed of
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Around 380 people signed up and they work in teams of eight, with more than 1,832 hours deployed and 2,056 bags of waste disposed of

Around 380 people signed up and they work in teams of eight, with more than 1,832 hours deployed and 2,056 bags of waste disposed of

Many poor people registered via the church, while a large minority on the street was approached to participate.

One of the local leaders, Felecia Cooks, was overwhelmed when she heard that Mayor Scott was planning to extend the program for another year.

& # 39; I just knew, & # 39; she told 12 News Now. & # 39; I never doubted. I never doubted because I knew our potential and I knew we would come to this point. And so I just wanted to cry with tears of joy. & # 39;

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