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The surviving children of ISIS terrorist Khaled Sharrouf are returned to Australia from the al-Hawl refugee camp in Syria

The federal government has risked the lives of relief workers to bring the children of an ISIS hunter back to Australia and at the same time deport a popular Sri Lankan Tamil family who have lived in Queensland.

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The surviving descendants of Sydney-born terrorist Khaled Sharrouf were rescued this week from Syria's infamous al-Hawl refugee camp, six years after their deceased father traveled to the Middle East to join IS.

The operation to evacuate a pregnant Zayneb, 18, her 17-year-old sister Hoda and their eight-year-old brother Humzeh to Australia, is controversial, as their deceased brother Abdullah was only seven when he was photographed with a cut-off head in 2014 .

The surviving children of ISIS terrorist Khaled Sharrouf are returned to Australia from the al-Hawl refugee camp in Syria

Nadesalingam, his wife Priya and their children Kopika and Tharunicaa are sent back to Sri Lanka after losing their High Court bid to continue losing

Nadesalingam, his wife Priya and their children Kopika and Tharunicaa are sent back to Sri Lanka after losing their High Court bid to continue losing

The federal government has risked the lives of relief workers to bring the children (left) of an ISIS hunter back to Australia and at the same time deport a popular Sri Lankan Tamil family who lived in Queensland

The surviving descendants of Sydney-born terrorist Khaled Sharrouf were rescued from al-Hawl's Syrian notorious refugee camp this week, six years after their deceased father traveled to the Middle East to join IS (pictured is Khaled Sharrouf with his sons Zaraqawi, Abdullah and the youngest Humzeh)

The surviving descendants of Sydney-born terrorist Khaled Sharrouf were rescued from al-Hawl's Syrian notorious refugee camp this week, six years after their deceased father traveled to the Middle East to join IS (pictured is Khaled Sharrouf with his sons Zaraqawi, Abdullah and the youngest Humzeh)

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The surviving descendants of Sydney-born terrorist Khaled Sharrouf were rescued from al-Hawl's Syrian notorious refugee camp this week, six years after their deceased father traveled to the Middle East to join IS (pictured is Khaled Sharrouf with his sons Zaraqawi, Abdullah and the youngest Humzeh)

He posted a horrific photo of his young son who held up the soldier's severed head and subtitled: & # 39; That's my son & # 39;

He posted a horrific photo of his young son who held up the soldier's severed head and subtitled: & # 39; That's my son & # 39;

The operation to evacuate a pregnant Zayneb, 18, her 17-year-old sister Hoda and their eight-year-old brother to Australia, is controversial, since their deceased brother Abdullah was only seven when he was photographed with a cut-off head in 2014

Only last month did Sri Lankan asylum seekers Priya and Nadesalingam lose their High Court bid to stay in Australia with their Australian-born children Kopika and Tharunicaa.

This happened even though the small central city of Biloela in Queensland, where they lived, lobbied the government to keep them in Australia, and collected 200,000 signatures on a petition since last year.

Nadesalingam, a husband and father, worked at the local slaughterhouse. His wife Priya had witnessed the deaths of men in her village and they fear that their previous ties with the separatist group Tamil Tigers could endanger their lives.

The South Asian couple came to Australia separately by boat in 2012 and 2013, a few years after Sri Lanka & # 39; s long-running civil war between the Sinhalese and the Tamils ​​ended.

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They were arrested last year during a morning attack on their home and have been detained in Melbourne for the past 15 months.

Tharunicaa, the couple's youngest daughter who turned two last week, has severe tooth decay and needs urgent surgery to eat solids.

The possible deportation of the Sri Lankan family has activated talkback radio, where a caller from the 2GB channel Alan Jones said it was wrong because the children of a terrorist were sent back to Australia.

& # 39; I am sitting here, my stomach is in a knot, I am in doubt about what this government is doing to this family, when we are talking about bringing … the children of terrorists back to this country and that is okay but we can't let these people stay, & he said.

& # 39; I am lost for words. & # 39;

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Jones agreed: & # 39; That is entirely true. & # 39;

Angela Fredericks, a social worker friend of the Sri Lankan family, described how Australian border officials stormed their Biloela house last March.

Only last month did Sri Lankan asylum seekers Priya and Nadesalingam lose their High Court bid to stay in Australia with their Australian-born children Kopika and Tharunicaa (photos are supporters in Melbourne)

Only last month did Sri Lankan asylum seekers Priya and Nadesalingam lose their High Court bid to stay in Australia with their Australian-born children Kopika and Tharunicaa (photos are supporters in Melbourne)

Only last month did Sri Lankan asylum seekers Priya and Nadesalingam lose their High Court bid to stay in Australia with their Australian-born children Kopika and Tharunicaa (photos are supporters in Melbourne)

This happened although the small central city of Biloela in Queensland, where they lived, had lobbied the government to keep them in Australia and collected 200,000 signatures on a petition since last year (photo is a young supporter in Melbourne)

This happened although the small central city of Biloela in Queensland, where they lived, had lobbied the government to keep them in Australia and collected 200,000 signatures on a petition since last year (photo is a young supporter in Melbourne)

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This happened although the small central city of Biloela in Queensland, where they lived, had lobbied the government to keep them in Australia and collected 200,000 signatures on a petition since last year (photo is a young supporter in Melbourne)

& # 39; This is a family that plunged into our community. They want to be part of our culture, ”she told Sydney radio broadcaster Alan Jones on Thursday.

& # 39; They stormed the house at 5 o'clock. An absurd number of border guards took them all, gave them about 15 minutes to pack, put them in separate cars and separated them from the children.

& # 39; What kills me is that the girls were not allowed to sit with their mother for that flight, their very first flight. So you can imagine the fear. It just sends shivers in me.

& # 39; I don't know how they can do that with people. & # 39;

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Mrs. Fredicks said the deportation was postponed until the young Tharunicaa's claims could be heard.

Refugee Action Coalition spokesman Ian Rintoul said the family remained in custody and people continued lobbying on behalf of their government, arguing that Tamils ​​were still living under military occupation, even though the civil war ended in 2009.

"They were established as a family in Biloela and beyond, there is still great concern about what would happen if they were returned – which should be taken into account," he said to Daily Mail Australia on Thursday.

The family had also captured the hearts of Bioela.

& # 39; You have an entire town in the Queensland countryside that wants them to stay, & # 39; said Rintoul.

Earlier this year, their grandmother Karen Nettleton found her surviving grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the al-Hawl refugee camp in northern Syria, after several trips to the Middle East

Earlier this year, their grandmother Karen Nettleton found her surviving grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the al-Hawl refugee camp in northern Syria, after several trips to the Middle East

Earlier this year, their grandmother Karen Nettleton found her surviving grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the al-Hawl refugee camp in northern Syria, after several trips to the Middle East

Their situation could no longer differ from the Sharouff children.

Earlier this year, their grandmother Karen Nettleton found her surviving grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the al-Hawl refugee camp in northern Syria, after several trips to the Middle East.

poll

Should the children of ISIS hunter Khaled Sharrouf be admitted back to Australia?

  • Yes 76 votes
  • No 422 votes

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The daughter of Mrs. Nettleton, Tara, who converted to Islam, died at the end of 2015 from appendicitis complications at the age of 31.

Her terrorist husband Sharrouf was reportedly killed by a drone or an air strike somewhere between 2015 and 2017.

After initially having doubts about helping the Sharrouf children return to Australia, Prime Minister Scott Morrison promised that they could be repatriated on the condition that Australians suffered damage to it.

Earlier this week, Zaynab, the oldest of the Sharrouf orphans, gave birth to her third child in Iraq, just two days after she and her two surviving brothers and sisters and her daughters were rescued from Syria.

Aid organizations angered ISIS sympathizers in the al-Hawl refugee camp as part of the operation.

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The ISIS extremists threatened to burn Australian women and children alive after eight children were rescued from Syria.

The eight orphans were transported to Iraq on Sunday in a secret operation organized by the Australian government.

Daily Mail Australia has asked the office of Foreign Minister Peter Dutton about the costs of repatriating the Sharrouf children.

Australians beg to come home after fighting with ISIS

Oliver Bridgeman, 21

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

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Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

  • The 21-year-old from Toowoomba in Queensland & Darling Downs claimed that he had traveled to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.
  • He previously assured his mother and father that he had not fought in the war-torn country, where ISIS terrorists are fighting for control.
  • His passport has been canceled by the Australian government and he has been stuck in the war-torn area since 2016.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26,

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

  • Alam joined the Islamic State just four weeks after it proclaimed its so-called Caliphate in 2014.
  • He reportedly expressed his regret for his participation.
  • The 26-year-old faces spend time in a prison camp in Syria and can be brought to Iraq for trial or possibly deported to Australia, where he can be prosecuted.

Ahmed Merhi, 27

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

  • The Sydney terrorist, Ahmed Merhi, has begged Australia to help him after he was sentenced to death by being stuck in Iraq.
  • The former student of the Granville Boys High School, from the west of Sydney, traveled to Syria in 2014 or 2015.
  • He claimed at the time that he was traveling to the war-torn area to provide assistance.

Janai Safar, 24

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

  • Safar lives in a refugee camp in northern Syria after his defeat.
  • She left Australia to allegedly become a member of the jihadist terror group in 2015.
  • She previously promised that she would never return to Australia.
  • & # 39; It was my decision to go here to leave naked women in the street. I don't want my son being brought up there, & she said.

Zehra Duman, 24,

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

  • Duman, from Melbourne, is believed to be held at the al-Hawl refugee camp in Syria with her two-year-old son and six-month-old daughter.
  • She claims she has been trying to leave ISIS for two years.
  • The 24-year-old said she knew Australians would be angry with her, but emphasized: “My children have the right to be treated like normal children.”

Khaled Sharrouf & # 39; s children: Zaynab, 17, Hoda, 16, and Humzeh, eight

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

  • The remaining three children of the Australian terrorist have been detained since mid-March in al-Hawl refugee camp in northeastern Syria.
  • Their mother, Tara Nettleton, who lives in Sydney, smuggled the children from Australia after her husband left to join the Caliphate.
  • Nettleton would have died in 2016, while Sharrouf and his two oldest sons would have been killed in 2017 in an air raid.

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