The Chicago police chief welcomes his son who gave him a kidney by force after a transplant that saved his life

Daniel Johnson, 26 (right), was sworn in as a Chicago police officer on Tuesday, just one year after donating a kidney to his father, Superintendent Eddie Johnson (right)

The son of the Chicago police chief was sworn in as a rookie officer just a year after donating a kidney to his father.

Daniel Johnson, 26, received a big hug from his father, Superintendent Eddie Johnson, 58, as he walked the stage on Tuesday, while the older one called him "one of the most special days" of his life.

Eddie was diagnosed with acute kidney inflammation more than three decades ago.

The doctors thought that their kidneys would only work for a few more years, but it was not until 2016 when the situation worsened.

His kidney function dropped to 10 percent and doctors told him he urgently needed a kidney transplant.

No matches were found after months of donor testing until it was revealed that Daniel was compatible and planned to donate the kidney to his father.

Daniel Johnson, 26 (right), was sworn in as a Chicago police officer on Tuesday, just one year after donating a kidney to his father, Superintendent Eddie Johnson (right)

Daniel Johnson, 26 (right), was sworn in as a Chicago police officer on Tuesday, just one year after donating a kidney to his father, Superintendent Eddie Johnson (right)

Daniel received a big hug from Eddie (in the picture) as he walked across the stage, with Elder Johnson calling him "one of the most special days" & # 39; of their life

Daniel received a big hug from Eddie (in the picture) as he walked across the stage, with Elder Johnson calling him "one of the most special days" & # 39; of their life

Daniel received a big hug from Eddie (in the picture) as he walked across the stage, with Elder Johnson calling him "one of the most special days" & # 39; of their life

Glomerulonephritis is an acute inflammation of the kidney that affects the glomeruli.

These are tiny structures that filter the kidneys, eliminating excess fluid, electrolytes and waste from the bloodstream through the urine.

The disorder can occur alone or as part of another disease such as diabetes or lupus, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The superintendent has been a central figure in trying to crack down on the Chicago crime.

His condition had reached such a grave point that he was forced to reveal at a press conference that he almost fainted when he learned that he was diagnosed with the disease more than 30 years ago when he first tried to become a policeman in the Windy City.

He had informed Mayor Rahm Emanuel of his condition after he was elected as superintendent in March 2016.

"Then, when I was diagnosed, I was 25 years old and, at that moment, the doctor … I thought my kidneys would probably last three to four years, and 31 years have passed," Eddie said, according to the Chicago Tribune.

He said that in 2016 alone, when his kidneys fell to 10 percent of his functional capacity, he was placed on the waiting list for a kidney transplant and, although he did more than expected, he was running out of time.

Eddie (in the photo) revealed in January that he was diagnosed three decades ago with glomerulonephritis, an acute inflammation of the kidney that affects the glomeruli, small structures that filter the kidneys.

Eddie (in the photo) revealed in January that he was diagnosed three decades ago with glomerulonephritis, an acute inflammation of the kidney that affects the glomeruli, small structures that filter the kidneys.

Eddie (in the photo) revealed in January that he was diagnosed three decades ago with glomerulonephritis, an acute inflammation of the kidney that affects the glomeruli, small structures that filter the kidneys.

After Eddie revealed that he was on a transplant waiting list because his kidneys were functioning at 10 percent capacity, Daniel was examined and found to be compatible. In the photo: Eddie, left, and Daniel, right

After Eddie revealed that he was on a transplant waiting list because his kidneys were functioning at 10 percent capacity, Daniel was examined and found to be compatible. In the photo: Eddie, left, and Daniel, right

After Eddie revealed that he was on a transplant waiting list because his kidneys were functioning at 10 percent capacity, Daniel was examined and found to be compatible. In the photo: Eddie, left, and Daniel, right

Eddie's nephrologist, Dr. Paul Crawford, also spoke at the press conference where the superintendent's kidney disease was revealed.

According to the Tribune, Dr. Crawford said African Americans are three to four times more likely to develop kidney disease because of a higher prevalence of diabetes or high blood pressure among that race.

After the public announcement of his father, Daniel decided to get tested and found that it was a match.

The operation was carried out on August 31, 2017 at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

You always focused on helping and helping others. And that includes helping me

Superintendent Eddie Johnson to his son Daniel Johnson

Only three days later, the superintendent was discharged from the hospital.

At that time, the medical center published a statement that said in part: "According to Mr. Johnson's transplant team, his kidney function is excellent, he is in good condition and is making a lot of progress."

In just over six weeks, Eddie had made such great progress that he was able to return to work at the Chicago Police Department.

Although a kidney transplant does not last forever, the average life of a kidney transplanted from a living donor is approximately 15 years.

On average, people can live 10 to 20 years after a kidney transplant.

At the time of the transplant, Daniel worked as an elementary school teacher, but he told his father that he was in the process of applying to become a Chicago cop.

Almost a year after the date of the surgery, Elder Johnson was able to see his son swear as a member of the force at the graduation ceremony at Navy Pier on Tuesday.

The operation was carried out on August 31, 2017 at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and was declared a success. In the photo: Eddie Johnson at a press conference, on the right, with Mayor Rahm Emanuel, on the left

The operation was carried out on August 31, 2017 at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and was declared a success. In the photo: Eddie Johnson at a press conference, on the right, with Mayor Rahm Emanuel, on the left

The operation was carried out on August 31, 2017 at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and was declared a success. In the photo: Eddie Johnson at a press conference, on the right, with Mayor Rahm Emanuel, on the left

At the time of the transplant, Daniel worked as an elementary school teacher, but he told his father that he was in the process of applying to become a Chicago cop. In the photo: Daniel shakes hands with Mayor Emanuel

At the time of the transplant, Daniel worked as an elementary school teacher, but he told his father that he was in the process of applying to become a Chicago cop. In the photo: Daniel shakes hands with Mayor Emanuel

At the time of the transplant, Daniel worked as an elementary school teacher, but he told his father that he was in the process of applying to become a Chicago cop. In the photo: Daniel shakes hands with Mayor Emanuel

& # 39; Not only am I here as superintendent. I must appear before you as a father watching my son follow in my footsteps. I promised him I would not do this, "Johnson told the audience as they applauded, according to the Chicago-Sun Times.

In spite of having promised his son that he would continue the discourse on police matters, Eddie could not help it and was moved.

"I am so incredibly proud of the young person you have become, since you were a little boy until when you decided to become a school teacher and now, a police officer, you have incarnated the meaning of the service," he said.

& # 39; Always focused on helping and helping others. And that includes helping me. "

There were 218 officers, 69 percent of whom are minorities and 20 percent of whom have relatives in the Chicago police, in Tuesday's graduation class.

There were also 111 detectives recently promoted as part of Emanuel's pressure to hire more than 1,000 police officers by force to combat the poor disappearance rate of homicides and shootings in the city.

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