The chaos in Hurricane Florence trips sees hundreds of canceled flights

Motorists, air passengers and train users suffered delays or cancellations on their trip on Wednesday, while Georgia and the Carolinas were preparing for the hurricane to arrive inland. In the photo: an interstate stuck in Savannah

Hurricane Florence was already causing travel chaos on Wednesday, with hundreds of flights and train journeys canceled and roads blocked by evacuees.

A total of 787 flights were canceled in the following three days from 1 p.m. (ET) – 206 on Wednesday, 413 on Thursday and 168 on Friday. That's in addition to more than a thousand delays on Wednesday, according to Flight Aware.

The Charleston International Airport, the busiest of the Carolinas, will close on Thursday and will not resume until Saturday at least. Amtrak also canceled trains going to Virginia and stops south of Washington, D.C., until Monday.

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Motorists, air passengers and train users suffered delays or cancellations on their trip on Wednesday, while Georgia and the Carolinas were preparing for the hurricane to arrive inland. In the photo: an interstate stuck in Savannah

Motorists, air passengers and train users suffered delays or cancellations on their trip on Wednesday, while Georgia and the Carolinas were preparing for the hurricane to arrive inland. In the photo: an interstate stuck in Savannah

The Charleston International Airport, the busiest of the Carolinas, will close on Thursday and will not resume until Saturday as soon as possible.

The Charleston International Airport, the busiest of the Carolinas, will close on Thursday and will not resume until Saturday as soon as possible.

The Charleston International Airport, the busiest of the Carolinas, will close on Thursday and will not resume until Saturday as soon as possible.

Hurricane Florence remained a category 4 hurricane on Wednesday morning as it moved across the Atlantic to the Carolinas and parts of Georgia. Up to 25 million people are at risk from the storm, which could cause damages of $ 170 billion.

The storm moved slightly southward during the night when its winds were reduced to 130 mph. It is expected to stagnate further before scraping the east coast of the United States and moving inland before the weekend.

Airlines, including American, Southwest, Delta and JetBlue, have begun allowing affected passengers to change their travel plans without the usual rates.

American and Southwest Airlines were among the carriers that canceled flights to and from the hurricane zone as of Wednesday.

Motorists drive on a busy I-40 westbound on Wednesday as the eastbound highway is empty before Hurricane Florence

Motorists drive on a busy I-40 westbound on Wednesday as the eastbound highway is empty before Hurricane Florence

Motorists drive on a busy I-40 westbound on Wednesday as the eastbound highway is empty before Hurricane Florence

Police stop cars at a checkpoint a day before the arrival of Hurricane Florence near Wrightsville Beach on Wednesday

Police stop cars at a checkpoint a day before the arrival of Hurricane Florence near Wrightsville Beach on Wednesday

Police stop cars at a checkpoint a day before the arrival of Hurricane Florence near Wrightsville Beach on Wednesday

The avalanche of people evacuating from the Carolinas has led to congestion on interstate highways

The avalanche of people evacuating from the Carolinas has led to congestion on interstate highways

The avalanche of people evacuating from the Carolinas has led to congestion on interstate highways

The Charleston International Airport in South Carolina tweeted that it hoped to close the runway before midnight on Wednesday.

"We expect those numbers to increase significantly in the next 24 hours, as the storm approaches and the airlines finalize their plans of operations," FlightAware spokeswoman Sara Orsi said in a statement seen by USA Today.

"It's really hard to speculate that far, however, according to current models, the biggest impact is likely to be at the Charlotte airport, which is an American Airlines center." If the storm continues on its way inland, we could see disruptions. in Hartsfield-Jackson Intl (ATL).

The Raleigh-Durham International Airport said it expected flights to operate on Thursday after the storm changed course to the south.

There is a lot of traffic on interstates in Georgia and the Carolinas, as residents evacuate their homes before the storm, and some are expected to close.

Airlines, including American, Southwest, Delta and JetBlue, have begun allowing affected passengers to change their travel plans without the usual rates.

Airlines, including American, Southwest, Delta and JetBlue, have begun allowing affected passengers to change their travel plans without the usual rates.

Airlines, including American, Southwest, Delta and JetBlue, have begun allowing affected passengers to change their travel plans without the usual rates.

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