The Canadian Mountie describes stopping but then letting the serial killers of teenagers go

A police officer described DailyMailTV how he stopped – but then let go – the two alleged teenage serial killers because the news about their triple killing had not reached his small town in Manitoba, Canada.

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Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Constable Albert Saunders stopped teenagers Kam McLeod (19) and Bryer Schmegelsky (18) and searched their vehicle after being blown through a police checkpoint in Split Lake, northern Manitoba, on July 22.

Saunders said in an exclusive interview: "I didn't really know those guys were on the run, so I didn't think much about it until after they posted their pictures the next day," & # 39; said Saunders.

The couple is said to commit a murder through British Columbia, 3,000 miles from where Saunders is located.

They are accused of killing Chynna Deese, 24, from Charlotte, North Carolina, and her Australian friend, 23-year-old Lucas Fowler in Liard Hot Springs, in northern British Columbia.

They also killed Vancouver botanist Leonard Dyck, 64, in Dease Lake, British Columbia, before he stole his gray 2011 Toyota RAV4.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Albert Saunders (pictured) told DailyMail.com how he stopped Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky on July 22 in Split Lake, northern Manitoba. The next day the teenagers were named as suspects in three murders in British Columbia, 3,000 miles away. He said he had found nothing in their car to make him suspicious

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Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Albert Saunders (pictured) told DailyMail.com how he stopped Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky on July 22 in Split Lake, northern Manitoba. The next day the teenagers were named as suspects in three murders in British Columbia, 3,000 miles away. He said he had found nothing in their car to make him suspicious

Still on the run: Kam McLeod (right) and Bryer Schmegelsky (left) are being hunted by the Canadian police

Still on the run: Kam McLeod (right) and Bryer Schmegelsky (left) are being hunted by the Canadian police

Still on the run: Kam McLeod (right) and Bryer Schmegelsky (left) are being hunted by the Canadian police

The Deese and Fowler & # 39; s bodies were found on July 15, Dyck & # 39; s were found on July 19.

But RCMP only warned its officers to watch Canadian McLeod and Schmegelsky on July 23 – the day after Saunders saw them.

Saunders said the teens were driving past him and RCMP partner Morgan Spence at a traffic control point in RAV4, which had not yet been reported stolen.

Saunders said: & # 39; They slowed down and then drove past. I had the lights on and I was standing outside the truck. Me and my partner jumped in the truck and we stopped them. & # 39;

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Saunders said the boys chased the police and stopped.

He said: “They turned off their engine and I asked them why they didn't stop, they had to stop when the lights were on.

& # 39; They just told me & # 39; sorry & # 39 ;. I asked them where they came from. & # 39; Vancouver & # 39; they said to me. They looked scared.

& # 39; I spoke to the one with the mustache, Kam Mcleod. He kept saying: & # 39; Sorry & # 39 ;. They didn't say where they were going. & # 39;

Saunders said he and his partner, both unarmed, were inspecting the vehicle.

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& # 39; I told them I was going to search quickly, and then I looked up, & # 39; said Saunders. & # 39; They kept looking at each other. There were a few boxes in the back. & # 39;

Saunders only found survival equipment when he searched the car. He saw no weapons.

The bodies of Lucas Fowler, 24, and Chynna Deese, 23 (photo) were found on April 15 in Liard Hot Springs, Northern British Columbia

The bodies of Lucas Fowler, 24, and Chynna Deese, 23 (photo) were found on April 15 in Liard Hot Springs, Northern British Columbia

The bodies of Lucas Fowler, 24, and Chynna Deese, 23 (photo) were found on April 15 in Liard Hot Springs, Northern British Columbia

They also killed Vancouver botanist Leonard Dyck, 64, in Dease Lake, British Columbia, before he stole his gray 2011 Toyota RAV4. It was this SUV where Corporal Saunders stopped the men on July 22. At the time it was not reported stolen

They also killed Vancouver botanist Leonard Dyck, 64, in Dease Lake, British Columbia, before he stole his gray 2011 Toyota RAV4. It was this SUV where Corporal Saunders stopped the men on July 22. At the time it was not reported stolen

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They also killed Vancouver botanist Leonard Dyck, 64, in Dease Lake, British Columbia, before he stole his gray 2011 Toyota RAV4. It was this SUV where Corporal Saunders stopped the men on July 22. At the time it was not reported stolen

Saunders said: & I said they had to stop the next time there was a situation like this, and they said & # 39; yes & # 39; and & # 39; sorry & # 39 ;, and they went. They drove into town, got some gas, and then went. They were on their way to Gillam. & # 39;

The RCMP agent described how he was destroyed with guilt after discovering that he could have put alleged serial killers in their tracks.

& # 39; I feel that I could have done something more like I should have done before, & # 39; he said.

Because officers at the traffic stop at Lake Split are unarmed and have no bulletproof vests, Saunders said he felt that he was also watching death that day.

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& # 39; After finding out who they were, I realized that I could have been shot or that something had happened to us. I thought about it a lot after I found out, & he said.

Constable Spence & nephew, Split Lake City Councilor Robert Spence, told DailyMailTV that his family member saw survival gear and maps when he searched their vehicle, but no weapons.

& # 39; Morgan, spoke with the thinner, Schmegelsky. He was quiet, & Spence said.

& # 39; Morgan said they should look around, check their vehicle for alcohol or drugs.

& # 39; But looking at the vehicle they were driving in, the officer said there were only survival gear, blankets, and lots of cards & said the counselor.

& # 39; They said they would just join the community, refuel and set off again. & # 39;

At a press conference in Surrey, British Columbia on July 23 - the day after Saunders stopped the teenagers - Royal Canadian Mounted Police Sergeant Janelle Shoihet named McLeod and Schmegelsky as suspects in three murders

At a press conference in Surrey, British Columbia on July 23 - the day after Saunders stopped the teenagers - Royal Canadian Mounted Police Sergeant Janelle Shoihet named McLeod and Schmegelsky as suspects in three murders

At a press conference in Surrey, British Columbia on July 23 – the day after Saunders stopped the teenagers – Royal Canadian Mounted Police Sergeant Janelle Shoihet named McLeod and Schmegelsky as suspects in three murders

Alderman Spence added that he believed that the officers, unaware of the alleged murder of the teenagers, were lucky enough to walk away with their lives.

& # 39; They were shocked. They said something could have happened, especially two police officers who were not equipped or equipped with personal protective equipment, & he told DailyMailTV.

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& # 39; (Spence and Saunders were) dressed just like you and me, just normal clothes, no uniforms, no guns, no pepper spray, no batons, nothing, & # 39; he added.

& # 39; They just stop entering vehicles in the community for alcohol and drugs. They were so lucky that they weren't shot or killed because they stopped those two people. & # 39;

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