The British really have it worse when it comes to heat waves!

Prolonged periods of heat hit the British harder because their bodies are not used to high temperatures, which means they overheat quickly. In the picture, travelers on the London Underground during this week's heat wave

Britain is experiencing a heat wave in summer, with temperatures reaching 36 ° C (97 ° F) in some parts of the UK today.

While this would be ignored by those who live in warmer climates, experts say that the UK really has it difficult when it comes to heat waves.

Prolonged periods of heat hit the British harder because their bodies are not used to high temperatures, which means they overheat quickly.

Scientists say that people in Britain also "do not know how to take care of themselves" during heat waves, stay too long in the sun and do not drink enough water.

This can lead to dehydration, leaving people tired, dizzy and dizzy.

Worse yet, British buildings are designed to keep warm and often lack air conditioning, very different from properties in other climates of the world.

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Prolonged periods of heat hit the British harder because their bodies are not used to high temperatures, which means they overheat quickly. In the picture, travelers on the London Underground during this week's heat wave

Prolonged periods of heat hit the British harder because their bodies are not used to high temperatures, which means they overheat quickly. In the picture, travelers on the London Underground during this week's heat wave

The British are not made for the heat

The recent heat wave has sent Britain into a frenzy, with people cleaning the shelves of all the electric fans and workers who take sick days just to avoid traveling in the heat.

This reaction to the heat has provoked the mockery of those who have become accustomed to warmer conditions, such as Down Australia, where Dr. Elizabeth Hanna, Australian climate and health specialist, argues that the British do not take care of themselves during the waves of heat.

Writing in The Advertiser in Adelaide, he said: "They do not know how to take care of themselves, they stay in the sun for a long time and they forget to drink a lot of water."

"People who are not used to the heat, especially when it's getting a bit damp, can overheat very quickly."

This is more a result of acclimation than of genetics: Australians and Britons, for example, have very similar DNA, but they seem to deal with heat in a very different way.

The heat wave that traps northern Europe has been doubled by climate change, the scientists revealed. An initial assessment of the extended period of hot weather suggests that the increase in temperatures caused by human activity increased the chances of this happening

The heat wave that traps northern Europe has been doubled by climate change, the scientists revealed. An initial assessment of the extended period of hot weather suggests that the increase in temperatures caused by human activity increased the chances of this happening

Scientists say that people in Britain also "do not know how to take care of themselves" during heat waves, stay too long in the sun and do not drink enough water. In the photo, the British enjoy the beach in Penzance, Cornwall, last week

In warm environments, the body decreases its metabolic rate to reduce heat production and stores less fat to reduce insulation, which means that those in persistently warm climates better adapt to extended heat waves.

Patrick Driscoll, executive director of medical technology firm MedMarket Diligence, said: "Heat (or cold) tolerance is dictated by a wide range of factors including basal metabolic rate, body shape, percentage of body fat , the climate within which you have spent most of your life, and others.

"It is well recognized that the body responds to environmental changes to accommodate them better and we have the ability to facilitate this."

Britain is experiencing a heat wave in summer, with temperatures reaching 36 ° C (97 ° F) in some parts of the UK today. In the photo, a soldier of the Queen's Guard in the heat in London last week

Britain is experiencing a heat wave in summer, with temperatures reaching 36 ° C (97 ° F) in some parts of the UK today. In the photo, a soldier of the Queen's Guard in the heat in London last week

Britain is experiencing a heat wave in summer, with temperatures reaching 36 ° C (97 ° F) in some parts of the UK today. In the photo, a soldier of the Queen's Guard in the heat in London last week

The design of buildings in Great Britain

Buildings in the UK are typically compact, with an average one-bedroom house measuring just 46 square meters (495 square feet), according to the Royal Institute of British Architects.

This, along with heavy insulation, means they are excellent for trapping heat and helping residents stay warm during the winter.

But after a few sunny days, British homes become "heat islands," an area that is significantly warmer than its surroundings.

According to Dr. Hanna, this effect makes it "very difficult for houses to cool down".

As a prolonged heat wave sees temperatures in the UK exceeding 36 ° C (97 ° F) today, Britain has been sent into frenzy while adjusting to what could be the hottest day since the records began. This week's heat was driven by a high-pressure bench called the 'melting of the Mediterranean & # 39;

As a prolonged heat wave sees temperatures in the UK exceeding 36 ° C (97 ° F) today, Britain has been sent into frenzy while adjusting to what could be the hottest day since the records began. This week's heat was driven by a high-pressure bench called the 'melting of the Mediterranean & # 39;

As a prolonged heat wave sees temperatures in the UK exceeding 36 ° C (97 ° F) today, Britain has been sent into frenzy while adjusting to what could be the hottest day since the records began. This week's heat was driven by a high-pressure bench called the 'melting of the Mediterranean & # 39;

WHAT ARE THE BEST WAYS TO MAINTAIN COOL DURING A HEATWAVE?

The NHS has a number of tips for staying cool during periods of unusually hot weather.

– Drink much liquid

– Open windows or other air vents around the house

– Shade or deck windows exposed to direct sunlight

– Grow plants inside and outside to provide shade and help cool the air

– Turn off lights and electrical equipment that is not in use

– Take a break if your house is too hot: go to a nearby building with air conditioning like a library or supermarket

Buildings in Britain also point in one direction, which means they are not designed around natural ventilation, like houses in North Africa or the Middle East.

"The problem with the British provision of housing is that there is no legislation to guarantee that residences have a double aspect," Ellis Woodman, executive editor of Building Design magazine, told BBC.

"This means you get many new apartments in cities that only have a room orientation, which means you can not have cross ventilation or a draft."

Without air conditioning

Unlike the warmer nations like Australia, few houses in Britain have air conditioning units to combat the heat.

A 2008 report by Mintel found that only 0.5 percent of households in the United Kingdom had any form of air conditioning.

In the United States, it is estimated that up to 100 million households have air conditioning units, which account for 15 percent of their total energy consumption.

Even the London Underground, which handles up to five million passenger trips per day, lacks air conditioning on most of its lines.

London subway staff this week urged bosses to allow them to wear shorts as temperatures in the network increased to more than 40 ° C (104 ° F).

Unlike the warmer nations like Australia, few houses in Britain have air conditioning units to combat the heat. In the photo, a sunbather sunbathing broke in Britain last week

Unlike the warmer nations like Australia, few houses in Britain have air conditioning units to combat the heat. In the photo, a sunbather sunbathing broke in Britain last week

Unlike the warmer nations like Australia, few houses in Britain have air conditioning units to combat the heat. In the photo, a sunbather sunbathing broke in Britain last week

The lack of outdoor cooling facilities

Unlike the warmer nations, the streets of Britain are not covered with water fountains or other outdoor cooling facilities.

Drinking water sources are common places in countries like the USA. UU Or Italy, which allows superheated walkers to cool quickly.

In the United Kingdom, they are much less common, with a 2010 report from the Children's Food Campaign, which reveals that only 11% of UK green spaces offer water sources.

Of these, only two thirds really worked.

Cities such as Seattle, New York, Chicago and Boston reserve public, air-conditioned community centers to offer respite from the heat.

These facilities also distribute water and medical attention to help with periods of warm weather.

HOW DID THE HIGH GLOBAL TEMPERATURES REACH DURING THE HEAT BURNER OF JULY 2018?

Temperature records throughout the world were destroyed by an unusual global heat wave in late June and early July 2018.

The suffocating heat cracked the roads and buckled the rooftops of all of Britain, when Motherwell reached the highest temperature ever recorded in Scotland at 91.8 ° F (33.2 ° C). The previous record was 91.2 ° F (32.9 ° C) established in August 2003 at Greycrook.

Glasgow had its hottest day recorded, reaching 89.4 ° F (31.9 ° C).

In Ireland, on June 28, Belfast also hit a record, reaching 85.1 ° F (29.5 ° C). Shannon also reached his own record at 89.6 ° F (32 ° C). In Northern Ireland, Castlederg reached 86.2 ° F (30.1 ° C) on June 29, its highest record.

In Canada, Montreal broke its previous record of the highest temperature, since the readings showed 97.9 ° F (36.6 ° C)

Ottawa published its most extreme combination of heat and humidity on July 1.

Meanwhile, in the United States, Denver, the capital of the state of Colorado, tied its historic high temperature record of 105 ° F (40 ° C) on June 28.

Burlington, in Vermont, set its lowest temperature of all time, registering a minimum of 80 ° F (27 ° C) within the 24-hour period on July 2.

While the western European islands burned in their own heat wave, Eurasia was also baking.

Yerevan, in the Soviet state of Armenia, saw temperatures rise to 107.6 ° F (42 ° C).

Russia, the host country of the World Cup this year, is also in the midst of a heat wave and several places in the southern part of the world's largest country equaled or exceeded its warmer temperatures in June.

In the Middle East nation of Oman, the lowest temperature for 24 hours on June 28 was 108.7 ° F (42.6 ° C) in the coastal city of Quriyat.

These fantastic numbers come a few months after Pakistan recorded the highest temperature ever seen on Earth.

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