The British carbon tax has led to a 93 percent drop in coal electricity since 2013

One study finds that the British carbon tax has caused a 93 percent drop in coal electricity since 2013, but has added about £ 39 to annual household bills.

  • The ‘Carbon price support’ was introduced in England, Scotland and Wales in 2013
  • Since 2015, the tax has been limited to £ 18 per tonne of CO2 equivalent
  • The proportion of energy to coal in the United Kingdom has fallen from 40 to 3% in six years.
  • Instead, Britain has relied on heavy sources of heavy and less renewable gases.
  • However, EU carbon-free electricity imports have also increased

Britain’s carbon tax has led to a 93 percent drop in the use of electricity from coal since it was first implemented in 2013, according to a report.

This decreasing dependence on coal, which accelerated after the tax was increased in 2018, has seen that the United Kingdom uses energy sources with fewer emissions such as gas.

Energy was also supplied from renewable sources and imports from Europe.

Experts from the University of Cambridge and University College London (UCL) also found that the tax increased household electricity bills by £ 39 on average in 2018.

It is believed that this raised around £ 740 million for His Majesty’s Treasury.

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Britain's carbon tax has led to a 93 percent drop in the use of coal electricity since it was first launched in 2013, according to a report (stock image)

Britain’s carbon tax has led to a 93 percent drop in the use of electricity from coal since it was first implemented in 2013, according to a report (stock image)

The tax, called ‘Carbon price support’, was introduced in England, Scotland and Wales in 2013 at a rate of £ 4.94 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent.

Since then it has increased, reaching £ 18 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2015, in which it has been limited until 2021.

The tax is part of the so-called ‘Total carbon price’, which also included the cost of permits from the European Union’s Emissions Trading System.

In the study, the researchers investigated how the tax impacted the flow of electricity to the connected countries and the revenues of the gigantic power cables called “ interconnectors ” that run between different countries between 2015 and 2018.

During this period, which followed the tax increase, the share of coal electricity generation in the United Kingdom fell from 28% in 2015 to 5% in 2018, reaching only 3% in September 2019.

This figure had been 40% before the introduction of the tax in 2013, when the United Kingdom generated 13.1 terawatt hours of coal-derived energy, a figure that had declined to 0.97 terawatt hours last year.

“Britain’s electrical transition is a monumental achievement of global interest,” said UCL energy expert Michael Grubb.

The change, he added, “has also demonstrated the power of an effective carbon price to reduce dependence on electricity generated from coal.”

The share of coal-fired power generation in the United Kingdom fell from 28% in 2015 to 5% in 2018, reaching only 3% in September 2019

The share of coal-fired power generation in the United Kingdom fell from 28% in 2015 to 5% in 2018, reaching only 3% in September 2019

The share of coal-fired power generation in the United Kingdom fell from 28% in 2015 to 5% in 2018, reaching only 3% in September 2019

“The Carbon Price Support provides a clear signal to our neighbors of its effectiveness in reducing CO2 emissions,” said lead author of the report and economist at Cambridge University David Newbery.

“If EU countries also adopted a high carbon tax, we would probably see huge reductions in carbon emissions across the continent, as we have seen in Britain in recent years,” added project leader Giorgio Castagneto-Gissey of UCL

Currently, the EU electricity sector is one that remains carbon intensive, with around 21 percent of its energy derived from coal-fired plants.

This decreasing dependence on coal, which accelerated after the tax increased in 2018, has caused the United Kingdom to use energy sources with less emissions such as gas

This decreasing dependence on coal, which accelerated after the tax increased in 2018, has caused the United Kingdom to use energy sources with less emissions such as gas

This decreasing dependence on coal, which accelerated after the tax increased in 2018, has caused the United Kingdom to use energy sources with less emissions such as gas

The researchers noted that the impact on the price of carbon tax for consumers was mitigated by an increase in the import of electricity from Europe, whose electricity is not subject to the carbon tax.

Instead, part of the cost was paid by an increase in continental electricity prices, particularly in France and the Netherlands.

“Carbon Price Support has been instrumental in removing coal from the network, but we show how it also creates distortions in cross-border trade, which justifies adoption across the EU,” said the author of the University’s Bowei Guo report. from Cambridge.

Both the findings of the report on international electricity trade and an annex to the report focused on impact of the price of carbon on British energy bills They were published on the UCL website.

WHAT ARE THE UNITED KINGDOM PLANS FOR ‘NET ZERO’ CARBON EMISSIONS?

On June 12, 2019, the Theresa May government launched plans for the United Kingdom to become neutral “ carbon ” by 2050.

However, experts are concerned about how the proposals will work.

The report is committed to ensuring that emissions generated by the United Kingdom are offset by removing the same amount of carbon from the atmosphere.

There are two main ways to achieve this: by planting more trees and installing ‘carbon capture’ technology at the source of contamination.

Some critics are worried that this first option will be used by the government to export its carbon offset to other countries.

International carbon credits allow nations to continue emitting carbon while paying for tree planting elsewhere, balancing their emissions.

Some argue that the scheme is a way for developed nations to avoid their environmental obligations, passing them to poor and developing countries.

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