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Every week 11 million items of clothing end up in a landfill in the UK and it is driven by a constant increase in new clothing. The textile supply chain makes an important contribution to global warming

& # 39; Fast fashion & # 39; causes climate change: every MINUTE, two tons of clothing are bought in the UK's main streets – with 50 tons of CO2 emissions

  • According to the Oxfam report, two tons of clothing are bought in the UK every minute
  • This corresponds to a total of 50 tonnes of CO2 emissions during the life of an item
  • Charity says that the poorest people in the world suffer more than the rich
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The UK's fast-paced fashion epidemic produces more than 50 tons of CO2 emissions every minute.

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Oxfam has issued a report describing the seriousness of the ongoing crisis in the fashion industry, which is a world leader in greenhouse gas emissions.

It turned out that the obsession with short-lived fashion trends causes the same amount of CO2 emissions every two minutes as driving six times around the world.

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Every week 11 million items of clothing end up in a landfill in the UK and it is driven by a constant increase in new clothing. The textile supply chain makes an important contribution to global warming

Every week 11 million items of clothing end up in a landfill in the UK and it is driven by a constant increase in new clothing. The textile supply chain makes an important contribution to global warming

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The statistics are based on lifetime emissions of new clothing purchased in the UK.

It is responsible for the procurement of raw materials, production, production, transport, washing and disposal.

According to Oxfam, a six-fold trip around the world (150,000 miles) produces 50 tons of CO2 emissions – the same as a single minute in the main streets of Great Britain.

Oxfam says that the poorest people in the world, who have done the least to cause climate change, suffer the most.

The richest 10 percent of the world is responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions, while the poorest half is responsible for 10 percent.

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Danny Sriskandarajah, Chief Executive of Oxfam, said: & These amazing facts about the impact of fashion on the planet and the poorest people in the world should make us all think twice before we buy something new to wear.

& # 39; We are in an emergency climate situation – we can no longer turn a blind eye to new clothing emissions or turn our backs on clothing workers who are paying a pittance unable to get out of poverty, regardless the number of hours they work. & # 39;

Buying a new white cotton shirt produces the same amount of emissions as driving a car for 35 miles.

A 100% cotton shirt of just 220 grams weighs 10.7 kg of CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

The study was commissioned by Oxfam for its Second Hand September campaign, where consumers promise not to buy anything new for the entire month.

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The textile industry is not only one of & # 39; the world's biggest polluters, many of its products are eventually thrown away.

According to Oxfam, a six-fold trip around the world (150,000 miles) produces 50 tons of CO2 emissions - the same as a single minute in the main streets of Great Britain. Oxfam says that the poorest people in the world, who have done the least to cause climate change, suffer the most

According to Oxfam, a six-fold trip around the world (150,000 miles) produces 50 tons of CO2 emissions - the same as a single minute in the main streets of Great Britain. Oxfam says that the poorest people in the world, who have done the least to cause climate change, suffer the most

According to Oxfam, a six-fold trip around the world (150,000 miles) produces 50 tons of CO2 emissions – the same as a single minute in the main streets of Great Britain. Oxfam says that the poorest people in the world, who have done the least to cause climate change, suffer the most

The richest 10 percent of the world is responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions, while the poorest half is responsible for 10 percent

The richest 10 percent of the world is responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions, while the poorest half is responsible for 10 percent

The richest 10 percent of the world is responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions, while the poorest half is responsible for 10 percent

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Every week 11 million items of clothing end up in a landfill in the UK.

Mr. Sriskandarajah added: “As consumers, it is our ability to make a real difference.

& # 39; Buying second-hand clothing helps slow down the wild fast fashion cycle, giving clothing a second life.

& # 39; By participating in Second Hand September, we are also giving a clear message to the clothing industry that we do not want to buy clothing that harms our planet and its people.

& # 39; Together we can make a difference and help reduce the impact of fast fashion on people and the environment. & # 39;

WHAT ARE THE UK'S PLANS FOR & # 39; NET ZERO & # 39; CARBON EMISSIONS?

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The plans for the UK to be carbon neutral & # 39; by 2050 were released on June 12, 2019 by the government of Theresa May.

However, experts are concerned about how the proposals will work.

The report undertakes to ensure that UK-generated emissions are offset by removing the same amount of carbon from the atmosphere.

There are two main ways to achieve this – by planting more trees and by installing & # 39; carbon capture & # 39; technology at the source of the pollution.

Some critics are concerned that this first option will be used by the government to export CO2 compensation to other countries.

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Thanks to international carbon credits, countries can continue to emit carbon while paying for trees planted elsewhere and balancing their emissions.

Some claim that the scheme is a way for developed countries to evade their environmental obligations by transferring them to poor and developing countries.

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