The bloodstains on the Shroud of Turin in which Jesus was buried & # 39; they're probably fake & # 39; claims experts

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

Experts have rejected allegations that the Turin Shroud is the death cloth of Jesus, after a new forensic investigation showed that the bloodstains were left by someone who had been standing, rather than being crucified.

The researchers concluded in the Journal of Forensic Sciences that the patterns of blood stains were not consistent with a corpse lying face down, according to a Buzzfeed report.

The Holy Shroud of Turin is a canvas measuring about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly stained image of a man that Christians believe represents Jesus.

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

Dr. Matteo Borrini, Liverpool forensic scientist John Moores University, said the joint investigation deepened the pattern of blood spatter and their mutual alignment on the web, in an analysis conducted according to crime scene investigations.

Dr. Matteo Borrini, Liverpool forensic scientist John Moores University, has studied blood patterns

Dr. Matteo Borrini, Liverpool forensic scientist John Moores University, has studied blood patterns

Dr. Matteo Borrini, Liverpool forensic scientist John Moores University, has studied blood patterns

He explained: This is the kind of forensic work done all the time in police investigations.

"Even a person crucified or hanged must leave a different blood pattern on the cloth, which would be fascinating information."

Dr. Borrini is a long-standing scientific consultant to the Italian skeptical society, the Committee for the Investigation of Claims of Pseudosciences.

The researcher worked with chemist Luigi Garlaschelli, from the University of Pavia in Italy, using real and artificial blood samples in cloth.

When observing the orientation of the spots, they sought to answer questions about whether the crucifixion shown on the Shroud of Turin was T-shaped, Y-shaped or revealed another type of ancient Roman execution.

The investigation involved the use of real and synthetic blood

The investigation involved the use of real and synthetic blood

The investigation involved the use of real and synthetic blood

The scientists tried to replicate certain scenarios in their forensic tests

The scientists tried to replicate certain scenarios in their forensic tests

The scientists tried to replicate certain scenarios in their forensic tests

They also tried to establish if the cloth had been wrapped around someone who had been hung on a cross, or upside down

They also tried to establish if the cloth had been wrapped around someone who had been hung on a cross, or upside down

They also tried to establish if the cloth had been wrapped around someone who had been hung on a cross, or upside down

What they found, however, was that the bloodstains were not consistent with any particular pose.

This suggested that someone who had been standing was used to print the famous patterns at different angles to the hands, chest and back, according to Buzzfeed.

Dr. Borrini explained that if it had been a death shroud of a person executed, hanging from a cross or thrown from one to bury it, the bloodstains on the fabric "should not be so inconsistent."

Dr. Matteo Borrini, a forensic scientist at Liverpool University John Moores, left, said the joint investigation deepened the pattern of blood spatter.

Dr. Matteo Borrini, a forensic scientist at Liverpool University John Moores, left, said the joint investigation deepened the pattern of blood spatter.

Dr. Matteo Borrini, a forensic scientist at Liverpool University John Moores, left, said the joint investigation deepened the pattern of blood spatter.

What they found was that the blood spots were not consistent with any particular pose

What they found was that the blood spots were not consistent with any particular pose

What they found was that the blood spots were not consistent with any particular pose

An expert in bloodstain patterns, Jonathyn Priest of Bevel, Gardner and Associates Inc., Oklahoma, told Buzzfeed that the scientific approach and methodology of the tests was "sound."

However, he noted that the findings were based on body parts kept in a fixed position, rather than the body being transported, cleaned or prepared for burial.

He noted that when the shroud showed blood patterns at the wrist level, it was more than likely that they came from a source other than the veins and small arteries in the hands, possibly meaning that the heart was still beating when it was created.

The revelations come about a year after other experts said that the Shroud of Turin was stained with the blood of a torture victim, which supports claims that it was used to bury Jesus.

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

The Holy Shroud of Turin, which measures about three meters by one meter and contains a slightly tainted image of a man that some believe is Christ

The Shroud of Turin: it is believed that the canvas was used to wrap the body of Christ after the crucifixion (original image)

The Shroud of Turin: it is believed that the canvas was used to wrap the body of Christ after the crucifixion (original image)

The Shroud of Turin: it is believed that the canvas was used to wrap the body of Christ after the crucifixion (original image)

They said that the canvas, which is believed to have been used to wrap the body of Christ after the crucifixion, contains "nanoparticles" that are not typical of the blood of a healthy person.

Elvio Carlino, a researcher at the Institute of Crystallography in Bari, Italy, said in July last year that the tiny particles revealed the "great suffering" of a victim wrapped in the funeral cloth.

These particles had a "peculiar structure, size and distribution", added the professor of the University of Padua, Giulio Fanti.

The Holy Shroud of Turin is seen by the faithful (stock image)

The Holy Shroud of Turin is seen by the faithful (stock image)

The Holy Shroud of Turin is seen by the faithful (stock image)

He said the blood contained high levels of substances called creatinine and ferritin, which are found in patients suffering from violent traumas such as torture.

Professor Fanti said: "Therefore, the presence of these biological nanoparticles found during our experiments points to a violent death for the man wrapped in the Shroud of Turin."

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