The authorities prohibit skateboards, bats and rocks from the Charlottesville demonstration, but ARMS are allowed

The place where Heather Heyer, 32, was murdered last year, has changed her name to Heather Heyer Way

There are no paintball guns, no skateboards, no sticks, no sticks, no sticks. And do not even think about taking sprinkler bears or flying a drone to downtown Charlottesville this weekend.

But while those items, and many more, are banned in the city of Virginia, as it marks the anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right event last year, there is nothing that prevents anyone from bringing a real weapon, even an AR-15, the weapon of choice for mass murderers throughout the United States.

"According to Virginia law, we can not regulate firearms," ​​city spokesman Brian Wheeler told DailyMail.com.

A handful of other cities in the state have that right, Wheeler said. After the violence last year, Charlottesville requested to be added to the list, but was rejected.

"It certainly seems sensible to me, but it's the law," he said.

The place where Heather Heyer, 32, was murdered last year, has changed her name to Heather Heyer Way

The place where Heather Heyer, 32, was murdered last year, has changed her name to Heather Heyer Way

The place is covered in flowers and chalk messages against hatred as the anniversary of his death approaches

The place is covered in flowers and chalk messages against hatred as the anniversary of his death approaches

The place is covered in flowers and chalk messages against hatred as the anniversary of his death approaches

The elders of the city of Charlottesville published a list of items that will be banned in an area of ​​18 blocks in the city center all weekend just as hundreds of state police descended into the university city, determined to prevent recurrence the violence of last year.

& # 39; Wooden or wood lengths & # 39; They are among the items included in the forbidden list, without specifying how long a length is. "Drinks or containers for beverages or metal containers are also prohibited, as are glass bottles."

But the only mention of the weapons was BB guns, shotguns, air rifles or pistols, paintball guns and stun guns. The real fact was not mentioned.

AR-15 semiautomatic rifles, the type of weapon that was used to kill 58 people and in last year's Las Vegas shooting, 49 revelers at Pulse Discoteca in Orlando, Florida, in 2016, 20 first-graders and six teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Connecticut in 2012 and 14 students and three faculty members at a high school in Parkland, Florida in February are not mentioned.

Pistols and rifles are nowhere to be found.

"If someone shows up with an AR-15 loaded, they'll be allowed in," Wheeler said.

The complete list of prohibited articles issued by the city says: BB guns, shotguns, air rifles or pistols, paintball guns, nunchucks, tasers, stun guns, large-caliber metal chains, pieces of wood or wood, poles, bricks, rocks, cans or containers for beverages or metal foods, glass bottles, axes, ax handles, hatchets, ice axes, acidic or caustic materials, dangerous or flammable or combustible liquids, skateboards, swords, knives, daggers, razor blades or other sharp objects, metal pipes, pepper or bear sprays, mace, sprays, catapults, wrist rockets, bats, sticks, sticks, drones, explosives, fireworks, open fire or open flames, and any other item considered an "instrument of disturbance".

People wearing masks and hoods will also be prevented from entering the city center.

Hundreds of state police descended into the university city, determined to prevent the recurrence of last year's violence

Hundreds of state police descended into the university city, determined to prevent the recurrence of last year's violence

Hundreds of state police descended into the university city, determined to prevent the recurrence of last year's violence

Buses containing police officers appear in the image arriving at the University of Virginia basketball stadium before the anniversary

Buses containing police officers appear in the image arriving at the University of Virginia basketball stadium before the anniversary

Buses containing police officers appear in the image arriving at the University of Virginia basketball stadium before the anniversary

Heather Heyer, 32, (pictured) protested why the racists died when she was mowed near the park

Heather Heyer, 32, (pictured) protested why the racists died when she was mowed near the park

Heather Heyer, 32, (pictured) protested why the racists died when she was mowed near the park

The Charlottesville authorities say they are doing everything possible to keep the city safe. About 700 state troopers and 300 members of the Virginia National Guard have been recruited to reinforce the city's police department.

Dozens of state police cars were circulating on the campus of the University of Virginia, where the additional policemen are in the John Paul Jones basketball stadium, and a state of emergency was declared.

"It's as if they had all the cops on this side of the Mississippi in the city," local resident Marybeth Collins told DailyMail.com as she walked into Emancipation Park, the epicenter of last year's rally.

The retired teacher said she feels there will be no repeat of last year's violence, which was triggered by a rally to protest the proposed removal of a 26-foot roof. High bronze statue of Robert E. Lee on horseback, the centerpiece of the park, which was known as Lee Park until June of last year.

"Obviously they were not ready last year, this year I think they are."

John Kessler, the organizer of the demonstration last year, has been denied a permit this year. But he has earned the right to hold a protest near the White House in Washington, DC on Sunday.

Wheeler said Kessler has the right to appear in Charlottesville as long as he does not host a rally of more than 50 people. "We just do not know if he will be here."

The city spokesman said he expected around 1,000 protesters in the city, but admitted that the figure could be very far.

The statue of Lee, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is still in the park. After the violence of last year, the city ordered that it be covered in black while the legal maneuvers were resolved to eliminate it. But in February of this year, a judge ordered to raise the shroud.

Last year's rally led by white supremacist Richard Spencer attracted many more protest opponents than protesters.

"It's as if they had all the cops on this side of the Mississippi in the city," local resident Marybeth Collins (pictured) told DailyMail.com as she walked into Emancipation Park, the epicenter of last year's rally. She is seen facing 26 feet. tall bronze statue of Robert E. Lee on horseback

Heather Heyer, 32, who protested against racists, died when she was killed near the park. The alleged Nazi sympathizer James Fields, 21, still faces a trial accused of his murder along with dozens of federal hate crimes.

The demonstration was recorded in the public's conscience after President Donald Trump insisted that there were "very good people on both sides."

His comments were condemned by all parties, including many leaders of his own Republican Party. Senior Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, whose brother was killed in action in World War Two, tweeted: "We should call evil by its name. My brother did not give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas so he would not be challenged here at home.

The place where Heyer, 32, was murdered – a section of 4th Street, now renamed Heather Heyer Way – was adorned with flowers and messages of hate against chalk as it approached the anniversary of his death.

Four months after the violence last August, the city police chief retired after only 18 months at work.

Many in the city feel that the extra presence of the police will keep the peace this year. George Hudson, a friend of Heyer told DailyMail.com; "It's sad that basically they had to close the city.

"And I really do not think anything important is going to happen."

But the additional police presence has provoked criticism from local activists. "Last year I was terrified of Nazi violence, and this year I'm terrified of police violence," said Black Lives Matter organizer Lisa Woolford, an English professor at the University of Virginia at the Daily Progress.

"We are seeing an overwhelming show of force to compensate for last year's police negligence," Woolford added. "For black and brown people and other marginalized people, we know that this police presence only increases our risk."

You see a sign about 26 feet. high bronze statue of Robert E. Lee before the anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right event last year

You see a sign about 26 feet. high bronze statue of Robert E. Lee before the anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right event last year

You see a sign about 26 feet. high bronze statue of Robert E. Lee before the anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right event last year

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