The author spends $ 135,000 to clone his beloved cocker spaniel Daisy after he dies

An afflicted author went behind the back of his wife to clone his beloved dog, Daisy (pictured) for an astonishing $ 135,000.

An afflicted author went behind his wife's back to clone his beloved dog for an astonishing $ 135,000.

Briton Tom Rubython could not understand a life without his best friend Daisy.

Then, when the cocker spaniel died in 2014, an afflicted Mr. Rubython tracked down a Korean lab dedicated to canine cloning: Sooam Biotech.

The 63-year-old man chilled Daisy and took the skin samples needed for the lab, all while trying to keep him hidden from his wife Beverly.

An afflicted author went behind the back of his wife to clone his beloved dog, Daisy (pictured) for an astonishing $ 135,000.

An afflicted author went behind the back of his wife to clone his beloved dog, Daisy (pictured) for an astonishing $ 135,000.

Because of the high price, Daisy's cells were used to create exact replicas of his beloved dog.

Mabel and Myrtle are identical to Daisy, who had a black and white coat.

"I sold my cars and made many sacrifices to do it, we do crazy, inexplicable things with our money," Rubython said after 60 minutes.

Beverly eventually discovered after discovering medical papers at her husband's desk.

"They robbed him and they did not have to hold a gun or wear a mask," he told her when he found out.

More than 1,117 puppies have been created using an egg harvested from a surrogate dog.

The sample has its nucleus removed and the DNA of the dead animal is inserted.

Mabel and Myrtle (in the photo) are identical to Daisy

Mabel and Myrtle (in the photo) are identical to Daisy

Mabel and Myrtle (in the photo) are identical to Daisy

A substitute will carry up to 30 cloned embryos at once, to increase the chances of a life birth.

The final step of this process is not only cruel, but ultimately, it makes no sense to critics.

& # 39; You're not going to reproduce the dog you lost that was your favorite pet. It just is not going to happen, "said biologist and stem cell geneticist Robin Lovell-Badge at 60 Minutes.

"It's a waste of money, it would be much better to go to the local kennel, choose a small, poor dog that may not have taken great care of itself, giving it a happy home."

Despite appearing identical, the animal's personality and temperaments will be different from the original, he said.

Briton Tom Rubython (pictured) could not understand a life without his best friend Daisy

Briton Tom Rubython (pictured) could not understand a life without his best friend Daisy

Briton Tom Rubython (pictured) could not understand a life without his best friend Daisy

.