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Heather Scammell (center), 61, from Berwick in Melbourne, Victoria had a stroke in 2013 that caused left-sided paralysis, but she had no voice problems
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An Australian woman had a stroke and lost her speaking skills, but when her voice returned she had a thick Italian accent.

Heather Scammell, 61, from Berwick, Melbourne, had a stroke in 2013 that caused left-sided paralysis, but she had no voice problems.

Nine months later, she collapsed and was told that the damage caused by her first stroke had increased, causing her to lose her voice for six weeks.

But when Mrs Scammell's voice returned, her Australian accent had disappeared and instead she had an Italian accent – which later grew into a German tone.

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Ms. Scammell was diagnosed with & # 39; Foreign Accent Syndrome & # 39 ;, a medical condition where patients develop speech patterns that differ from their native accent.

Heather Scammell (center), 61, from Berwick in Melbourne, Victoria had a stroke in 2013 that caused left-sided paralysis, but she had no voice problems

Heather Scammell (center), 61, from Berwick in Melbourne, Victoria had a stroke in 2013 that caused left-sided paralysis, but she had no voice problems

& # 39; My speech changes between accents, but never went back to my Aussie accent & # 39 ;, Mrs. Scammell told Daily Mail Australia.

She has also developed Dyspraxia, which makes coordinated movements difficult and affects her speech.

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& # 39; I am tired, my speech is very confused and sometimes incomprehensible. & # 39;

Mrs Scammell said that the Foreign Accent Syndrome in combination with Dyspraxia has strongly influenced her life.

& # 39; I can't work anymore and I get very tired, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; If I speak for a long time, I am exhausted and I can no longer explain it as an Australian.

& # 39; My speech is very strange now and I am becoming very intolerant to people who do not speak well. & # 39;

Nine months after her first stroke, she collapsed and was told that the damage from her stroke had increased, so she lost her voice for six weeks
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Nine months after her first stroke, she collapsed and was told that the damage from her stroke had increased, so she lost her voice for six weeks

Nine months after her first stroke, she collapsed and was told that the damage from her stroke had increased, so she lost her voice for six weeks

Mrs. Scammell contacted a retired professor in the UK who specializes in speech abnormalities to try to understand why she has the Foreign Accent Syndrome, but he was unable to answer.

& # 39; Initially my neurologist said that my old voice would return, & # 39; said Mrs. Scammell.

& # 39; But the professor said that if you don't get your old voice back within six months, you'll never get it back. & # 39;

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Although Mrs. Scammell's life has changed since her stroke, she still loves her life.

& # 39; I'm glad I'm still here and hope to be able to stay for a long time, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; I love life It took a while to accept my destiny, but I have a wonderful husband and wonderful family and friends around me, so life is good. & # 39;

But when Mrs Scammell's voice returned, her Australian accent had disappeared and instead she had a thick Italian accent that eventually developed into a German accent

But when Mrs Scammell's voice returned, her Australian accent had disappeared and instead she had a thick Italian accent that eventually developed into a German accent

But when Mrs Scammell's voice returned, her Australian accent had disappeared and instead she had a thick Italian accent that eventually developed into a German accent

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A Tasmanian woman also developed the Foreign Accent Syndrome in 2013 after a serious injury in a car accident.

Mrs. Rowe first spoke in what sounds like a French accent when she woke up at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne with a broken back and jaw.

She told me ABC: & # 39; It makes me so angry because I'm Australian. I am not a Frenchman, I have nothing against the French people. & # 39;

A Tasmanian woman also developed the Foreign Accent Syndrome in 2013 after a serious injury in a car accident. Leanne Rowe (center) first started talking in what sounds like a French accent when she woke up at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne with a broken back and jaw

A Tasmanian woman also developed the Foreign Accent Syndrome in 2013 after a serious injury in a car accident. Leanne Rowe (center) first started talking in what sounds like a French accent when she woke up at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne with a broken back and jaw

A Tasmanian woman also developed the Foreign Accent Syndrome in 2013 after a serious injury in a car accident. Leanne Rowe (center) first started talking in what sounds like a French accent when she woke up at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne with a broken back and jaw

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Foreign Accent Syndrome tends to develop as a result of a head trauma, migraine or developmental problems.

There have been only 150 confirmed cases of Foreign Accent Syndrome in the world so far.

The Foreign Accent Syndrome is documented in cases around the world, including accent changes from Japanese to Korean, British English to French, American English to British English and Spanish to Hungarian.

FOREIGN ACCENT SYNDROME

Foreign Accent Syndrome is a speech disorder that causes a sudden change of speech, so that a native speaker is spoken with a "strange" accent.

Foreign Accent Syndrome is usually caused by brain damage caused by a stroke or traumatic brain injury.

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Other causes have also been reported, including multiple sclerosis and conversion disorder.

In some cases, no clear cause has been established.

Speech can be changed in terms of timing, intonation and tongue placement, so that it is perceived as strange.

Listeners can usually still understand the patient's speech; it does not necessarily sound disordered.

The Foreign Accent Syndrome is documented in cases around the world, including accent changes from Japanese to Korean, British English to French, American English to British English and Spanish to Hungarian.

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There have been only 150 confirmed cases of Foreign Accent Syndrome in the world so far.

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