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In an effort to get the money to save Eleanor & # 39; s life, the Oakley & # 39; s launched a GoFundMe page, which raised more than $ 124,000 in just 48 hours

A toddler who has been diagnosed with an aggressive cancer in children has just fallen back with a new brain tumor and her family is desperately trying to get her to the United States to save her life.

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Three-year-old Eleanor Oakley from Tasmania was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma when her parents noticed a lump on her cheek last January.

Despite an extensive treatment regimen at the Royal Children's & # 39; s Hospital in Melbourne in the last year, the doctor discovered a new tumor in July.

Her parents, Tasmania Fire Service firefighter Rob and teacher Jacqui, are desperately trying to raise $ 300,000 for a life-saving clinical trial – the 8H9 antibody.

In an effort to get the money to save Eleanor & # 39; s life, the Oakley & # 39; s launched a GoFundMe page, which raised more than $ 124,000 in just 48 hours

In an effort to get the money to save Eleanor & # 39; s life, the Oakley & # 39; s launched a GoFundMe page, which raised more than $ 124,000 in just 48 hours

Three-year-old Eleanor Oakley, from Tasmania, was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma when her parents noticed a lump on her cheek last January

Three-year-old Eleanor Oakley, from Tasmania, was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma when her parents noticed a lump on her cheek last January

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Three-year-old Eleanor Oakley, from Tasmania, was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma when her parents noticed a lump on her cheek last January

The 8H9 antibody targets and attacks central nervous system neuroblastoma cells and is currently unavailable in Australia.

& # 39; Our heart breaks every day and sees her go through it & # 39 ;, Mrs. Oakley told Daily Mail Australia.

In an attempt to get the money to save Eleanor & # 39; s life, the Oakley & # 39; s have a GoFundMe page, which raised more than $ 124,000 in just 48 hours.

& # 39; A pharmaceutical company can come forward and pay, but there is no confirmation yet, & # 39; said Mrs. Oakley.

If a pharmaceutical company pays the costs of getting Eleanor to the US, the family promises to repay the money to those who have donated or donated the money to cancer research in children.

& # 39; We are only trying to have our daughter treated, & # 39; said Mrs. Oakley.

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After suffering from the disease for more than a year, the family was delighted to hear the news that Eleanor received clear scans in April.

& # 39; In April of this year we received a happy scan and Eleanor was able to travel to the US for a medicine to keep it in remission & # 39 ;, Mrs. Oakley said.

Three-year-old Eleanor was diagnosed with aggressive cancer in January 2018 and her family desperately tries to get her to the United States to save her life

Three-year-old Eleanor was diagnosed with aggressive cancer in January 2018 and her family desperately tries to get her to the United States to save her life

Three-year-old Eleanor was diagnosed with aggressive cancer in January 2018 and her family desperately tries to get her to the United States to save her life

Her parents, Tasmania Fire Service firefighter Rob and teacher Jacqui desperately try to raise $ 300,000 for a life-saving clinical trial - the 8H9 antibody

Her parents, Tasmania Fire Service firefighter Rob and teacher Jacqui desperately try to raise $ 300,000 for a life-saving clinical trial - the 8H9 antibody

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Her parents, Tasmania Fire Service firefighter Rob and teacher Jacqui desperately try to raise $ 300,000 for a life-saving clinical trial – the 8H9 antibody

However, during her three-month follow-up scan, just two days after her third birthday in July, a new tumor was discovered in the right frontal lobe of the three-year-old brain.

"We've been through this terrible journey for the past two years – it's not getting any easier every day, it's getting easier to manage every day," Mrs. Oakley said.

& # 39; Our heart breaks every day and sees her go through it. & # 39;

Eleanor now suffers from a neuroblastoma relapse in the central nervous system and underwent major brain surgery on August 8 to remove the tumor.

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While the operation was successful, some neuroblastoma cells remain in the central nervous system and require therapy to stabilize and prevent further spread.

& # 39; Neuroblastoma can have quite a high relapse rate of cancer – up to 50% – what is actually said, & # 39; said Mrs. Oakley.

& # 39; There are good treatments here in Melbourne, but the disease is trying to come back if possible. & # 39;

During her three-month follow-up scan, just two days after her third birthday in July, a new tumor was discovered in the right frontal lobe of the three-year-old brain on her brain

During her three-month follow-up scan, just two days after her third birthday in July, a new tumor was discovered in the right frontal lobe of the three-year-old brain on her brain

During her three-month follow-up scan, just two days after her third birthday in July, a new tumor was discovered in the right frontal lobe of the three-year-old brain on her brain

Eleanor now suffers from a neuroblastoma relapse of the central nervous system and underwent major brain surgery on August 8 to remove the tumor
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Eleanor now suffers from a neuroblastoma relapse of the central nervous system and underwent major brain surgery on August 8 to remove the tumor

Eleanor now suffers from a neuroblastoma relapse of the central nervous system and underwent major brain surgery on August 8 to remove the tumor

Unfortunately, antibody therapy is the only hope to cure Eleanor's neuroblastoma – traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy are only used as palliative treatment.

The Oakleys want to cure Eleanor and give her the best chance to live a full and happy life and believe that the 8H9 protocol is the only chance to do that.

That's why they are hoping to raise at least $ 300,000 to take Eleanor to the United States to get the treatment – instead of keeping her in Australia and extending her life with palliative care.

& # 39; The antibody we are looking for in America will increase the chance of its recovery by 50 percent, & # 39; said the young mother.

Mrs. Oakley hopes that if all goes well, the family may return to Tasmania and live a normal life again.

& # 39; We are divorced by our family because we are concerned about the immunity of Eleanor, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; All we want her to do is do what a normal three-year-old does without being tied to this disease – we want to be able to control the disease and still enjoy her life. & # 39;

Mrs. Oakley hopes that if all goes well, the family may be able to return to Tasmania and live a normal life again

Mrs. Oakley hopes that if all goes well, the family may be able to return to Tasmania and live a normal life again

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Mrs. Oakley hopes that if all goes well, the family may be able to return to Tasmania and live a normal life again

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