The Australian council says about the rescue of furniture or appliances for the collection of the fence of the council

Every year, many Australians leave furniture and appliances to pick them up at the board (stock image)

The truth about junk garbage: what the law says about rummaging through other people's unwanted items, and you may be surprised

  • Every year, many Australians leave furniture and appliances to pick them up on the council.
  • But if you see something that you like, can you take it home legally?
  • It turns out that it's not as simple as someone's trash is our treasure
  • Depending on where you live, there are rules about whether you can take or not

Cindy Tran for Daily Mail Australia

We have all found perfectly good furniture, sitting on the side of the road waiting for the collection of the council.

Among the unwanted items left on the sidewalk, you see a beautiful white cabinet that desperately needs a new coat of paint.

But are you legally authorized to take it home?

It turns out that it's not as simple as someone's trash is your treasure because it really comes down to your place of residence in Australia, ABC News reported.

Every year, many Australians leave furniture and appliances to pick them up at the board (stock image)

Every year, many Australians leave furniture and appliances to pick them up at the board (stock image)

In Brisbane, residents are encouraged to take what they find for street picking on the condition that they leave the surplus items stacked hastily.

But if you are living in Darwin, the rubbish & # 39; technically & # 39; It belongs to the person who put it there until the pickup of the council on the sidewalk.

"If there is something in a pile that people would like to use again, as a courtesy they should try to get in touch with the person who placed them there to ask if it is okay," a spokeswoman for the city of Darwin told the publication.

Sydney residents can take any unwanted item at their own risk as long as there are no laws preventing residents of Adelaide, Melbourne or Perth from salvaging property.

& # 39; It is illegal to throw unwanted items on the street. He could be fined $ 500 for it (up to $ 2,200 in some cases), "said the city of Sydney.

& # 39; There are better ways to get rid of your garbage, like donate or resell. You can also use our free weekly pick-up service.

Is it legally allowed to take it home? It turns out that it's not as simple as someone's trash is our treasure because it's really where you live in Australia

Is it legally allowed to take it home? It turns out that it's not as simple as someone's trash is our treasure because it's really where you live in Australia

Is it legally allowed to take it home? It turns out that it's not as simple as someone's trash is our treasure because it's really where you live in Australia

Only seniors and holders of a concession card can reserve a service for unwanted pickup in Canberra.

The ACT government discourages residents from rummaging through other people's unwanted items.

"The public should be aware that they may be taking items that belong to another person and should check with the residence before taking any item," said a spokesperson.

The City of Hobart does not offer a curbside pick-up service, but residents can contact the Resource Work Cooperative to reserve a bulky household item.

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