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Dozens of spectators ran in front of the exits during scenes of child rape in a new movie called The Painted Bird that was screened at the Venice Film Festival

MORE cinema-goers flee for the gruesome Holocaust film The Painted Bird, which shows brutal scenes of incest, bestiality, child rape and mutilation

  • More cinema-goers have fled the shocking new Holocaust film The Painted Bird
  • The latest Václav Marhoul film saw festival-goers flee during the show in Toronto
  • Film contains scenes of incest, rape, bestiality, murder and being buried alive
  • One & # 39; well-dressed woman became so fond of getting out that she hit a stranger & # 39;
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More cinema-goers have fled the shocking new Holocaust film The Painted Bird at the Toronto film festival, after the premiere in Venice shocked the world.

Some shocked audience members walked out of the film screening at the Toronto Film Festival on Sunday – days after dozens of audience members ran to the exits during scenes of child rape in Venice.

The film by director Václav Marhoul is based on the highly controversial 1965 novel by Jerzy Kosinski about a Jewish boy who survives the worst human nature that can be inflicted on him in an unnamed Eastern European country.

The book, which Kosinski initially claimed to be autobiographical, but then turned out to be fiction, contains stubborn scenes of incest, rape, murder and a young boy who is almost struck by a bird's death.

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Dozens of spectators ran in front of the exits during scenes of child rape in a new movie called The Painted Bird that was screened at the Venice Film Festival

Dozens of spectators ran in front of the exits during scenes of child rape in a new movie called The Painted Bird that was screened at the Venice Film Festival

Participants in the Venice Film Festival were shocked by the latest film by Václav Marhoul, based on Jerzy Kosinski's novel of the same name from 1965

Participants in the Venice Film Festival were shocked by the latest film by Václav Marhoul, based on Jerzy Kosinski's novel of the same name from 1965

The book, which Kosinski initially claimed to be autobiographical, but then turned out to be fiction, contains stubborn scenes of incest, rape, murder, and someone pecked to death by a bird

The book, which Kosinski initially claimed to be autobiographical, but then turned out to be fiction, contains stubborn scenes of incest, rape, murder, and someone pecked to death by a bird

Participants in the Venice Film Festival were shocked by the latest film by Václav Marhoul, based on Jerzy Kosinski's novel of the same name from 1965. The book, which Kosinski initially claimed to be autobiographical, but then turned out to be fiction, contains stubborn scenes from incest, rape, murder, and someone almost killed by a bird

Kosinski was born in 1933 in Poland and survived the Second World War under a false identity.

What were some of the worst scenes in The Painted Bird?

  • In one scene a furious and somewhat crazy Eastern European man is involved who measures the eyes of another man, because he believes he is interested in his wife.
  • Another scene shows young boys bleeding as they drag themselves across the floor after being shot.
  • The protagonist, The Boy, is repeatedly raped after being handed over to a pedophile by a priest.
  • A young boy buried to the neck is left to the birds and is almost pecked dead.
  • In another scene, Jews on a train going to a concentration camp break a hole in the side of the carriage and escape – only to be mown by German soldiers.
  • The Boy meets a woman who focuses her desires on him because The Boy cannot satisfy her and takes revenge on him in a beast scene with a goat.

Within two decades of publishing his book, it was discovered that Kosinski plagiarized some scenes from other popular Polish books.

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According to reviewers, Marhoul remained faithful to the book in his adaptation, up to the scene in which a young man was watching another man's eyes because he thought he was interested in his wife.

According to Forward, Marhoul defended his grim adaptation to the press in Venice and said: & only in the dark can we see light. To shine through all the horrors is to me hope and love. & # 39;

He spent 11 years recording the film and even invented a new Slavic sounding language for the small amount of dialogue in the film, so that it could serve as a commentary on the war-struck Eastern Europe as a whole.

In the review of Xan Brooks for the Guardian, he told how a & # 39; well-dressed woman became so mad as to get out that she hit the stranger on the next seat & # 39 ;.

And how a man & # 39; fell completely on the stairs in his attempt to escape & # 39 ;.

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The film, recorded in black and white, portrays the story of a young Jewish boy trying to reunite with his father by traveling through Europe occupied by the Nazis.

Reviewers say Marhoul remained true to the book in his adaptation, up to the scene in which a young man was watching another man's eyes because he believes he is interested in his wife

Reviewers say Marhoul remained true to the book in his adaptation, up to the scene in which a young man was watching another man's eyes because he believes he is interested in his wife

Reviewers say Marhoul remained true to the book in his adaptation, up to the scene in which a young man was watching another man's eyes because he believes he is interested in his wife

One scene shows young boys desperately trying to crawl free after being shot

One scene shows young boys desperately trying to crawl free after being shot

One scene shows young boys desperately trying to crawl free after being shot

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He meets a woman who is convinced that he is a vampire and enslaves him before being saved by a priest.

The priest then hands him over to a pedophile who repeatedly rapes him.

Along the way he is gradually hardened emotionally by various forms of abuse until he finally escapes at the end but remains heartless – Marhoul & # 39; s remark about how war leaves society in general.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail