The animal behavior expert reveals why cats can not resist a cardboard box

According to Dodman, the close contact with the inside of the box probably endorphins do nature's own morphine-like substances cause pleasure and reduce stress in cats?

Twitter has been on fire with people surprised by cats that seem to be forced to park in tape boxes marked on the ground.

These felines seem powerless to resist the call of #CatSquare.

This fascination in social networks is a variation of a question I heard again and again as a panelist in the Animal & # 39; s America's Cutest Pets series.

They asked me to watch video after video of cats climbing into cardboard boxes, suitcases, sinks, plastic containers, cabinets and even wide-necked vases.

"That's so cute … but why do you think she does that?" It was always the question. It was as if every incident of climbing or clenching had a completely different explanation.

It did not. It's just a fact of life that cats like to get into small spaces where they feel much safer and safer.

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According to Dodman, the close contact with the inside of the box probably endorphins do nature's own morphine-like substances cause pleasure and reduce stress in cats?

According to Dodman, close contact with the probable endorphins inside the box-nature's own morphine-like substances themselves-cause pleasure and reduce stress in cats

Instead of being exposed to the clamor and the possible danger of open spaces, cats prefer to snuggle in smaller, more clearly delineated areas.

When young, they used to cuddle with their mother and littermates, feeling the warmth and soothing touch.

Think of it as a kind of diaper behavior. The close contact with the inside of the box, we believe, releases endorphins, the same substances similar to natural morphine, causing pleasure and reducing stress.

Along with Temple Grandin, I investigated the comforting effect of the lateral lateral pressure & # 39 ;.

We discovered that the drug naltrexone, which counteracts endorphins, reversed the soporific effect of the gentle squeeze of pigs. Hugs, someone?

Also remember that cats make nests: small discreet areas where mothers give birth and provide shelter for their kittens.

It is likely that even in the case of the so-called "virtual box", when cat owners make a square on the ground using tape

It is likely that even in the case of the so-called "virtual box", when cat owners make a square on the ground using tape

The expert says it's just a fact of life that cats like to get into small spaces where they feel much safer and safer

The expert says it's just a fact of life that cats like to get into small spaces where they feel much safer and safer

The expert says it's just a fact of life that cats like to get into small spaces where they feel much safer and safer. It is likely that even in the case of the so-called "virtual box", when cat owners make a square on the ground using tape

Keep in mind that no behavior is totally exclusive to a particular sex, whether they are castrated or not.

Small spaces are in the behavioral repertoire of cats and are generally good (except for the cat carrier, of course, which has negative connotations, such as car rides or a visit to the veterinarian).

A variation on this issue occurs when the box is so shallow that it does not provide all the comforts you may have.

Or, once again, the box may not have walls at all, but simply be a representation of a box, say a square stuck with duct tape on the floor.

This virtual box is not as good as the real object, but it is at least a representation of what it could be, if there were a real square box in which to nest.

Small spaces are in the behavioral repertoire of cats and are generally good (except for the cat carrier, of course, which has negative connotations, such as car rides or a visit to the veterinarian). Stock Photo

Small spaces are in the behavioral repertoire of cats and are generally good (except for the cat carrier, of course, which has negative connotations, such as car rides or a visit to the veterinarian). Stock Photo

Small spaces are in the behavioral repertoire of cats and are generally good (except for the cat carrier, of course, which has negative connotations, such as car rides or a visit to the veterinarian). Stock Photo

DO CATS DOMINATE THE HOME? STUDIO SHOWS BULLY DOGS

In a study of homes with two pets, more than half of the owners say that their cat has attacked their dog threateningly.

However, less than one in five has seen his dog threaten his cat.

About 56.5 percent said their cat had threatened their dog, compared to 18 percent whose dog had threatened the cat.

And although cats are typically smaller than dogs, they still manage to inflict injuries on their domestic rivals. Almost a tenth of the owners reported that their cat had hurt the dog, but less than 1 percent said that their dog had hurt the cat.

The findings come from a study of nearly 750 owners, who overwhelmingly believe that the cat is king.

While dogs and cats can live together in a friendly way, they said, it is rarely a "close relationship," and if they get along it's mostly the cat's. Cats that are often uncomfortable with dogs were less likely to form a friendly relationship, they added.

The co-author of the study, Dr. Sophie Hall, of the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln, said: "In light of this, these results suggest that the cat is the pivot of a home with dogs. The princess and the dog are lower in the hierarchy.

"It may be that the menacing acts of the cats are more obvious to the owners, as they whistle or hit a dog with their feet.

"But it is also possible that cats are less domesticated in their behavior." It is important to keep in mind that these findings are the owners 'perceptions of their pets' relationships, but it seems that the cat has to be happy and happy, instead of the dog, to live happily together. "

The study, published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior, says cats and dogs can get along better if the cat is smaller when they start sharing a space.

This virtual box can provide a feeling of safety and psychosomatic comfort out of place.

The problem of boxed cats was put to the test by Dutch researchers who gave refuge to cats boxes as retreats.

According to the study, cats with boxes adapted to their new environment more quickly compared to a control group without boxes: the conclusion was that cats with boxes were less stressed because they had a cardboard hiding place to hide.

Instead of being exposed to the clamor and the possible danger of open spaces, cats prefer to snuggle in smaller, more clearly delineated areas. When young, they used to snuggle with their mother and littermates, feeling the warmth and the relaxing touch

Instead of being exposed to the clamor and the possible danger of open spaces, cats prefer to snuggle in smaller, more clearly delineated areas. When young, they used to snuggle with their mother and littermates, feeling the warmth and the relaxing touch

Instead of being exposed to the clamor and the possible danger of open spaces, cats prefer to snuggle in smaller, more clearly delineated areas. When young, they used to snuggle with their mother and littermates, feeling the warmth and contact, as a kind of diaper behavior

Let this be a lesson for all felines: cats need boxes or other containers for environmental enrichment purposes.

Hidden holes in higher locations are even better: being on top provides security and a bird's-eye view of the world, so to speak.

Without a real box, a square on the floor may be the best choice for a cat, although it is a poor substitute for the real thing.

Whether it's a shoe box, a shopping bag or a square on the floor, it probably gives the cat a sense of security that the open space simply can not provide.

The conversation

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