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The ancient Egyptian mummy Takabuti died after being stabbed in the back in her 20 years

The famous Irish mummy Takabut was killed at twenty by someone who stabbed her in the back near her left shoulder, a new study revealed.

Takabut was a woman who lived in ancient Egypt 2,600 years ago.

His cause of death has been an enduring mystery for decades, since it was brought to Ireland in 1834 and developed for the first time the following year.

The analysis of his well-preserved remains has also revealed that he had curly brown hair and is believed to be a high-ranking woman in the city of Thebes, where Luxor is today.

It was also discovered that Takabuti had two strange features, which are only seen in a minority of the population.

He had an extra tooth, 33 instead of standard 32, which is only found in 0.02 percent of all people.

The scans also found that he had an extra vertebra that is present in only two percent of the population.

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A detailed analysis revealed that Takabuti (pictured) died at age 20 after being stabbed in the back near his left shoulder. His cause of death had been an enduring mystery for decades.

A detailed analysis revealed that Takabuti (pictured) died at age 20 after being stabbed in the back near his left shoulder. His cause of death had been an enduring mystery for decades.

A team of experts from the National Museums of NI, the University of Manchester, Queen’s University of Belfast and Kingsbridge Private Hospital used X-ray scanners, CT scans, carbon dating and hair analysis to learn the secrets of the life of Takabuti

The scans show that she was stabbed in the upper back near her left shoulder and that it was the cause of her death.

The fatal wound was full of material, which the researchers initially confused with his heart.

In addition to discovering his spooky end, the team also discovered several anomalies about his burial.

After almost two centuries of searching, they finally also found their heart shrunk and disheveled in the depths of their chest.

This, say the researchers, is extremely rare.

Dr. Greer Ramsey, Curator of Archeology at the National Museums of NI, said: “ There is a rich history of Takabuti evidence since it first developed in Belfast in 1835.

‘But in recent years he has undergone radiographs, CT scans, hair analysis and radiocarbon dating.

‘The latest tests include DNA analysis and additional interpretations of CT scans that provide us with new and much more detailed information.

“The importance of confirming that Takabuti’s heart is present cannot be underestimated, since in ancient Egypt this organ was removed in the afterlife and weighed to decide if the person had led a good life.”

Takabuti tests and examinations were carried out over a period of months and used a portable X-ray machine and other revolutionary techniques.

Takabuti was taken to Belfast, Ireland, in 1834 by Thomas Greg of Holywood, County Down, who acquired it in Thebes.

Professor Rosalie David, an Egyptologist at the University of Manchester, said: ‘This study adds to our understanding not only of Takabuti, but also of the broader historical context of the times in which he lived.

‘The surprising and important discovery of its European heritage casts a fascinating light on a significant turning point in the history of Egypt.

‘This study, which used cutting-edge scientific analysis of an ancient Egyptian mummy, demonstrates how new information can be revealed thousands of years after the death of a person.

“Our team, from institutions and specialties, was in a unique position to provide the experience and technology necessary for such a comprehensive study.”

It is believed that the curly-haired woman is a high-ranking woman in the city of Thebes, where Luxor is today. A team of experts used X-ray scanners, CT scans, carbon dating and hair analysis to learn about the secrets of Takabuti's life.

It is believed that the curly-haired woman is a high-ranking woman in the city of Thebes, where Luxor is today. A team of experts used X-ray scanners, CT scans, carbon dating and hair analysis to learn about the secrets of Takabuti's life.

It is believed that the curly-haired woman is a high-ranking woman in the city of Thebes, where Luxor is today. A team of experts used X-ray scanners, CT scans, carbon dating and hair analysis to learn about the secrets of Takabuti’s life.

It was also discovered that Takabuti had two strange features that are only seen in a minority of the population. He had an extra tooth, 33 instead of the normal 32, something that only happens in 0.02 percent of people and an extra vertebra, present in only two percent of the population

It was also discovered that Takabuti had two strange features that are only seen in a minority of the population. He had an extra tooth, 33 instead of the normal 32, something that only happens in 0.02 percent of people and an extra vertebra, present in only two percent of the population

It was also discovered that Takabuti had two strange features that are only seen in a minority of the population. He had an extra tooth, 33 instead of the normal 32, something that only happens in 0.02 percent of people and an extra vertebra, present in only two percent of the population

After almost two centuries of searching, they finally also found their heart shrunk and disheveled in the depths of their chest. This, say the researchers, is extremely rare. What they thought before was that it was discovered that their heart was material used to pack their mortal wound

After almost two centuries of searching, they finally also found their heart shrunk and disheveled in the depths of their chest. This, say the researchers, is extremely rare. What they thought before was that it was discovered that their heart was material used to pack their mortal wound

After almost two centuries of searching, they finally also found their heart shrunk and disheveled in the depths of their chest. This, say the researchers, is extremely rare. What they thought before was that it was discovered that their heart was material used to pack their mortal wound

Professor Eileen Murphy, a bioarchaeologist at the School of Natural and Built Environment at Queen’s University in Belfast, said: ‘The latest research program has provided some surprising results.

“It is often said that she looks very calm lying inside her coffin, but now we know that her last moments were everything but her and she died at the hands of another.

“ When tracking the historical records about his first days in Belfast, it is clear that he caused a media sensation in 1835: he had a poem written about it, he made a painting of it before his ‘unwound’ and the stories of his unfolding were Taken in newspapers across Ireland.

“ The research done ten years ago gave us some fascinating ideas, such as the way her reddish brown hair was deliberately curly and combed.

‘This must have been a very important part of his identity, since he rejected the typical skinhead style.

“By observing all these facts, we begin to have an idea of ​​the little young woman and not just the mummy.”

What is a CT scan?

Computed tomography (computed tomography) uses x-rays and a computer to create detailed images.

They are several individual radiographs that create two-dimensional images of a “cut” or section of the sample / individual.

Although an x-ray creates a flat image, several can be combined to build complex 3D images.

A CT scanner emits a series of narrow beams as it moves through an arc.

This is different from an x-ray machine, which sends a single beam of radiation.

CT scan produces a more detailed final image than an X-ray image.

This data is transmitted to a computer, which generates a three-dimensional cross-sectional image of the body part and displays it on the screen.

CT scans are used to get an in-depth view of hard-to-reach places and are commonly used in human medicine.

They can be used to diagnose conditions in the bones and internal organs, as well as to determine the size, location and shape of a tumor.

CT scans are also used to recreate images of extinct animals or to obtain an in-depth view of fragile archaeological remains.

CT scanners combine several different 2D X-ray images into a complex 3D image that can reveal high levels of detail in human organs, tissues and archaeological remains.

CT scanners combine several different 2D X-ray images into a complex 3D image that can reveal high levels of detail in human organs, tissues and archaeological remains.

CT scanners combine several different 2D X-ray images into a complex 3D image that can reveal high levels of detail in human organs, tissues and archaeological remains.

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