The American government finances research into technology that connects the brains of soldiers with computers

The US government funds research into technology that connects the brains of soldiers with computers

  • DARPA finances an initiative to connect the spirit of soldiers with computers
  • Technology can control UAV & # 39; s, monitor and communicate security networks
  • Devices are likely to take the form of a helmet that can read users' brain signals
  • The agency says it strives to have a preparatory device ready in four years

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) finances research that can give a future generation of soldiers the power to control machines and weapons with their minds.

The agency said it will fund six organizations through the Next Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program, which will work on designing and building interfaces for use in the US Army that can be worn as a soldier and their brain signals in instructions can translate.

These instructions can be used to control flocks of unmanned aircraft, to use cyber defense systems or to enable military communication.

Soldiers may be able to control vehicles and more by only using their thoughts under a new initiative from the US Department of Defense. Stock image

Soldiers may be able to control vehicles and more by only using their thoughts under a new initiative from the US Department of Defense. Stock image

Although the performance may sound solid in the realm of science fiction, according to DARPA it sets a completion date within four years.

"DARPA is preparing for a future in which a combination of unmanned systems, artificial intelligence and cyber operations can lead to conflicts on timelines that are too short for people to manage effectively with current technology alone," said Al Emondi , the N3 program manager.

& # 39; By creating a more accessible interface between the brain and the machine that does not require surgery, DARPA can provide tools that allow mission commanders to remain meaningfully involved in dynamic operations that are developing rapidly. & # 39;

According to an IEE Spectrum report, DARPA has not only marketed aggressive timelines for when preliminary versions of the technology could be completed, but it has also supported initiatives with significant funding.

Two grant recipients have reported receiving between $ 18 and $ 19.5 million for the performance of their IEE Spectrum research reports.

Although brain-to-computer interfaces have been studied and tested by DARPA in the past, previous applications, such as those used to control prosthetic limbs and restore a sense of touch, have relied on invasive surgical implants.

A new crop of technologies, DARPA says, will avoid those surgical methods and develop hardware that can read brain signals simply by standing close to the user's head.

According to DARPA, a new set of technologies will eliminate surgical methods and enable communication between brains and computers with only a headset.

According to DARPA, a new set of technologies will eliminate surgical methods and enable communication between brains and computers with only a headset.

According to DARPA, a new set of technologies will eliminate surgical methods and enable communication between brains and computers with only a headset.

& # 39; If N3 is successful, we will end up with portable neural interface systems that can communicate with the brain from a range of just a few millimeters, moving neurotechnology outside the clinic and practically used for national security, & # 39; said Emondi.

& # 39; Just as service personnel put on protective and tactical gear to prepare for a mission, they can in the future put on headphones with a neural interface, use the technology they need and set the tool aside when the mission is completed. & # 39;

DARPA says that these non-surgical methods range from technology that uses ultrasound to read electrical signals in the brain to other & # 39; meticulously invasive & # 39; modes for which a & # 39; nanotransducer & # 39; should be taken to help the brain communicate with a helmet-mounted transceiver.

DARPA will be merged into efforts to develop a viable brain-to-computer interface by at least one high-profile private sector company, Neuralink, which is supported by Tesla CEO, Elon Musk.

According to a Bloomberg report this month, Neuralink has raised millions of dollars in its attempt to build a device that can connect brains to computers. The latest submission show, Neuralink, raised $ 39 million from a $ 51 million funding target.

What the device of Neuralink will look like or what it will be able to do, however, remains a mystery because Musk has provided few details since the company was founded a few years ago.

HOW DOES ACCURATE PRECISE PROSTHESES?

Prosthetics that attach to a part of the human body often consist of objects that enable a person to perform a specific function, such as running sheets.

Scientists are working on developing personalized prostheses and responding to the wearer's commands.

To do this, small pads are placed on the patient's skin.

They are located around the end of muscles and where the nerve endings begin.

The electrodes detect the electrical signals produced by the muscle nerves and translate this via a computer.

To activate these sensors, the patient must actively think about performing an action.

For example, to signal a biceps contraction, the person wearing the prosthesis should remember to flex his arm.

By understanding which muscles are signaled by the brain to contract, scientists can predict how a limb would move.

This is then recreated in real time by the prosthesis, so that wearers can think of an action and the artificial limb can then carry it out.

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