The agony of Nelson's battle is revealed in a 223-year letter written after the Battle of Corsica

Admiral Lord Nelson (pictured) revealed his physical pain and blindness in a letter written in 1795 to the British Minister of Genoa, Italy.

Admiral Lord Nelson (pictured) revealed his physical pain and blindness in a letter written in 1795 to the British Minister of Genoa, Italy.

Admiral Lord Nelson (pictured) revealed his physical pain and blindness in a letter written in 1795 to the British Minister of Genoa, Italy.

The physical pain that Admiral Lord Nelson suffered from battle wounds can be revealed in a 223-year-old letter that has surfaced.

The naval hero described the agony he suffered a year after losing sight in his right eye during the Battle of Corsica in 1794.

Even the simple task of writing letters was arduous for him, judging by the note he wrote to the British Minister of Genoa, Italy, in August 1795.

He wrote: & # 39; I'm almost blind and I write this letter with great pain & # 39;

At the time of writing, Nelson was also concerned about the French ships in the Italian port of Genoa that his fleet was blocking.

Although the city was neutral in the Napoleonic Wars, the British were worried about the French increasing their presence there.

During 1795, the British Navy prevented the French vessels from retreating and restricted the arrival of merchant ships from which the enemy could benefit.

At the same time, Nelson's fleet also had to make sure that the goods destined for the people of Genoa could pass.

The letter, now on sale for £ 8,000, reveals a more personal side to the naval officer. Before signing his note, Nelson wrote, "I'm almost blind and I write this letter with great pain." (seen in the second block of text) giving a rare idea of ​​his suffering

The letter, now on sale for £ 8,000, reveals a more personal side to the naval officer. Before signing his note, Nelson wrote, "I'm almost blind and I write this letter with great pain." (seen in the second block of text) giving a rare idea of ​​his suffering

The letter, now on sale for £ 8,000, reveals a more personal side to the naval officer. Before signing his note, Nelson wrote, "I'm almost blind and I write this letter with great pain." (seen in the second block of text) giving a rare idea of ​​his suffering

The four-page letter was written ten years before the Battle of Trafalgar, where Admiral Nelson was shot.

The four-page letter was written ten years before the Battle of Trafalgar, where Admiral Nelson was shot.

Nelson lost his right arm after being hit by a musket ball at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife

Nelson lost his right arm after being hit by a musket ball at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife

Despite numerous injuries in battle, Nelson became the best sailor in Britain, and culminated with his famous victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, where he was shot deadly. In the photo on the right is Nelson after the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, where he lost his right arm

In the letter that has now gone on sale for £ 8,000, Nelson tries to assure the British minister that the actions of his fleet were not to the detriment of the locals.

He wrote: "The disposition and acts of my Cruizers (sic) will soon prove that Genoa is not blocked, since all ships will arrive in perfect safety, which are not French nor loaded with French property.

"The cruises in front of Cabo Corse will not stop the trade as well as where I have placed them … I have been very careful not to offend the flag or the Genoese territory".

Nelson's fleet prevented the French ships from leaving the Italian port of Genoa at the time the letter was written. Pictured is Nelson's column in Trafalgar Square, London

Nelson's fleet prevented the French ships from leaving the Italian port of Genoa at the time the letter was written. Pictured is Nelson's column in Trafalgar Square, London

Nelson's fleet prevented the French ships from leaving the Italian port of Genoa at the time the letter was written. Pictured is Nelson's column in Trafalgar Square, London

The letter was written two years before Nelson lost his right arm after being hit by a musket ball at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

In spite of the injuries, Nelson became the best sailor of Great Britain, that culminated with its famous victory in Batalla de Trafalgar in 1805 during which it received a mortal firing.

The four-page letter written 10 years earlier is being sold by a private collector at Forum Auctions, based in London.

Auctioneer Max Hasler said: "Nelson wrote many letters to many people, but it is very rare to find one in which he opens up and gives him an idea of ​​his suffering.

"The personal statement is in many ways the most interesting aspect of this letter.

& # 39; His view degenerated and clearly he was suffering. There was no time or chance for him to recover from the injury and allow his body and eyes to adapt.

"Maybe the pain was caused by the tension in his eyes which made writing a letter an effort that was clearly very painful for him.

The letter will be sold on September 27.

What happened at the Battle of Corsica?

The British and Corsican military fought against a French garrison during the invasion of Corsica.

The campaign included sieges in three main cities in northern Corsica; San Fiorenzo, Bastia and Calvi.

The cities were surrounded, besieged and bombed until August 1794 when the French forces had been expelled from the island completely.

The French soldiers retreated to Bastia where they surrendered after 37 days.

British reinforcements besieged a French fortress on the island, in Calvi, which was bombed for two months.

The French finally surrendered in August 1794.

Nelson lost his sight in his right eye during the fight in Corsica.

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