The 58-year-old Milwaukee woman dies of a rare blood infection after being bitten by her new puppy.

Sharon Larson, 58, was bitten by her new puppy Bo in June, causing a small cut but then developed a deadly infection that killed her two days after being diagonada.

A woman from Wisconsin was killed by a rare blood infection that was caused by a bite from her new puppy.

Sharon Larson, 58, was bitten by her puppy Bo in June, causing a small cut and then fell ill.

The woman from Milwaukee developed flu-like symptoms that would not go away and she was taken to the hospital where she tested positive for the Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteria. Sharom died two days later.

This particular bacterium is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, but it can cause infections in immunocompromised humans.

Doctors believe that the same bacteria was contracted by Wisconsin man, Greg Manteufel, 48, who had all his limbs amputated after a lick of his puppy.

Sharon Larson, 58, was bitten by her new puppy Bo in June, causing a small cut but then developed a deadly infection that killed her two days after being diagonada.

Sharon Larson, 58, was bitten by her new puppy Bo in June, causing a small cut but then developed a deadly infection that killed her two days after being diagonada.

Greg Manteuful, 48, was infected with a bacterial pathogen known as capnocytophaga canimorsus, the same bacteria that killed Sharon.

Greg Manteuful, 48, was infected with a bacterial pathogen known as capnocytophaga canimorsus, the same bacteria that killed Sharon.

Greg Manteuful, 48, was infected with a bacterial pathogen known as capnocytophaga canimorsus, the same bacteria that killed Sharon.

"They told me she could be struck by lightning four times and live, win the lottery twice," her husband Dan Larson told NBC affiliate TMJ4.

"This weird thing is supposed to be," he said.

Dan said he thought his wife got the flu, but when general antibiotics did not work, he rushed to take Sharon to the hospital.

In two days, she died.

& # 39; I feel like I got robbed. I lost my right arm. My best friend, "said Dan.

It is believed that the same bacteria affected Greg Manteufel, who had also developed flu-like symptoms after a beating of his dog.

When bruises appeared on his arms and legs, the West Bend man was rushed to the emergency room.

Doctors told him that a blood infection had spread to all four extremities and, due to extensive muscle and tissue damage, they would be forced to amputate all their limbs.

Greg has developed sepsis, or blood poisoning, and his nose, his two hands and legs below his knees turned black.

The doctors amputated his legs until the kneecaps and the arms until the forearms, and they must realize a plastic surgery in the nose.

They told Greg that the infection was probably transmitted through a lick from his own dog. In the photo: Greg with his legs amputated and his hands before being amputated

They told Greg that the infection was probably transmitted through a lick from his own dog. In the photo: Greg with his legs amputated and his hands before being amputated

So far, he has had leg amputations to the kneecaps, arms to the forearms and will need extensive plastic surgery on his nose (pictured)

So far, he has had leg amputations to the kneecaps, arms to the forearms and will need extensive plastic surgery on his nose (pictured)

They told Greg that the infection was probably transmitted through a lick from his own dog. So far, he has had leg amputations to the kneecaps (left), arms to the forearms and will need extensive plastic surgery on his nose (right)

Capnocytophaga Canimorsus is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, but can cause infections in immunocompromised humans.

Capnocytophaga Canimorsus is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, but can cause infections in immunocompromised humans.

Capnocytophaga Canimorsus is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, but can cause infections in immunocompromised humans.

WHAT ARE THE BACTERIA FOUND IN THE SALIVA DE DOGS?

Capnocytophaga Canimorsus, a bacterial pathogen, is typically found in the saliva of cats and dogs.

It has the rare ability to cause disease in healthy individuals, but it is known to cause serious illness in people with pre-existing conditions or a compromised immune system.

The transmission of the bacteria can occur through bites, licks or even proximity to animals.

Symptoms usually appear between one and eight days after exposure, but mainly on the second day. They can vary from flu-like symptoms to sepsis.

The infection can usually be treated effectively with antibiotics, but there may be long-term side effects, including gangrenous amputation, heart attack, and kidney failure. Approximately 30 percent of all infected people die.

Source: CDC

"We can not understand well that, suddenly, he is 48 years old and has been with dogs all his life, and then this happens," said his wife Dawn.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the bacteria is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats.

A study from Japan in 2014 found that bacteria were present in 69 percent of dogs and 54 percent of cats.

The bacteria can be transmitted to humans through bites, licks or even proximity to the animal, filtering into the skin even without cutting or scraping it.

While most people will not have any symptoms if they become infected, it has been shown to cause serious illness in those who have compromised the immune system, according to a French study in 2003.

It is not clear if Sharon or Greg had any pre-existing conditions that made them susceptible to the bacteria.

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