The & # 39; return culture & # 39; is harmful to the environment with CO2 emissions and contributes to landfills

The & # 39; return culture & # 39; is harmful to the environment: experts believe that the return process ends up in landfills of 14 tons of CO2 emissions and billions of unwanted items

  • Around 3 million packages are returned each year and this is harmful to the environment
  • Studies show that the return process causes at least 14 tons of CO2 emissions
  • Experts discovered that more than 4 billion pounds of unwanted items end up in landfills
  • This is the result of ordering more colors and sizes to find the perfect fit
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More than three million packages are returned each year and experts warn that these unwanted items can harm the environment.

Studies have shown that more than four billion pounds of unwanted goods end up in landfills and that 14 tons of CO2 end up in the atmosphere as part of the return process.

The recent statistics stem from a new phenomenon called & # 39; the return culture & # 39; – Consumers now order items in multiple sizes and colors to find the perfect fit, resulting in a guaranteed return.

More than three million packages are returned each year, but most come from December.

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With the holidays ahead, UPS predicts that more than a million packages will be returned every day during the month of December, as first reported by EuroNews.

It is predicted that the return on January 2 will be 1.9 million.

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Studies have shown that more than four billion pounds of unwanted goods end up in landfills and that 14 tons of CO2 end up in the atmosphere as part of the return process

Studies have shown that more than four billion pounds of unwanted goods end up in landfills and that 14 tons of CO2 end up in the atmosphere as part of the return process

This is a 26 percent increase from 2018, which is a sign of how many people have chosen to shop online for the holidays instead of making purchases in the store.

Sharon Cullinane, professor of sustainable logistics, and Michael Browne, said in a statement last year:

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"First, customers must understand how many returns affect the environment and behave more responsibly." Secondly, retailers can do a number of things to handle returns more efficiently. They also have a responsibility not to encourage consumers to return items.

& # 39; Third, carriers must both improve their efficiency and switch to warehouses and transports with less impact on the environment. & # 39;

More than three million packages are returned each year, but most come from December. Amazon & # 39; s CEO said his 1-day shipment will reduce his carbon footprint, experts say it requires more energy and generates more emissions

More than three million packages are returned each year, but most come from December. Amazon & # 39; s CEO said his 1-day shipment will reduce his carbon footprint, experts say it requires more energy and generates more emissions

More than three million packages are returned each year, but most come from December. Amazon & # 39; s CEO said his 1-day shipment will reduce his carbon footprint, experts say it requires more energy and generates more emissions

MIT researchers have said in the past that it can be more environmentally friendly to order goods online than to go to a physical store – but this was before the innovation of fast shipping.

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos believes that his 1-day shipment will reduce his carbon footprint, experts say it requires more energy and generates more emissions – emissions from the e-commerce giant increased by 6 percent in 2018 compared to 2015.

Crystal Lassiter, UPS Director of Global Sustainability & Environmental Affairs, wrote in a report: & # 39; We drive more kilometers, use more energy and generate more emissions in response to market demand and to meet the growing needs of our customers in the supply chain. & # 39;

WHAT IS THE COMPULSIVE PURCHASE DISORDERS?

First mentioned at the beginning of the 20th century, it is a disease where patients go way too far, to the point of serious financial or social problems.

Also known as & # 39; compulsive spending disorder & # 39; or oniomania, it has been associated with other impulse disorders such as drug abuse, alcoholism and gambling.

Sufferers may feel compelled to splash on things they don't need, want or use because they enjoy the recognition or importance that a large customer has, or to reinforce low self-esteem.

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One line of thought says that purchases close the gap between how patients see themselves and how they want to be seen, or their & # 39; ideal self & # 39 ;.

That is why luxury shoes, body care items and expensive electrical items often pop up in their shopping lists.

It is reinforced by a materialistic attitude that says that a person's self-esteem comes only from what he has.

Sufferers say to themselves that the more they have – and the more expensive it is – the better & # 39; better & # 39; they must be.

Forced shoppers are mainly motivated by the desire to change their state of mind – for which shopping becomes an easy solution.

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But the high is fleeting and soon shoppers notice that they are forced to keep their good mood.

Source: Psychology today

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