The & # 39; howling & # 39; moon: small meteors hit the surface

The & # 39; howling & # 39; moon: small meteors hit the surface and cause 3 centimeters deep water in the lunar floor to spit out, scientists say

  • Small meteorite impacts release water from the moon, say NASA scientists
  • They estimate that the consequences lead to the loss of 200 tons of water per year
  • Meteors hit the soil that is dry up to 3 inches below the surface, that has a layer with about 0.05 percent water content that is then released

Small meteors collapsing against the moon cause water from the moon, according to NASA scientists.

They suggest that the underground moisture that is released has been retained since the moon formed, or shortly thereafter.

These findings can lay the foundation for future research into the origin and fate of water on the moon.

The researchers estimate that meteorite impacts on the moon cause the loss of no less than 200 tons of water per year.

The impact hit the bottom, which is 3 inches (8 cm) deep at the bottom, which is a layer with about 0.05% water content that is washed away when impacted.

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Small meteors collapsing against the moon cause water from the moon, according to NASA scientists. They suggest that the underground moisture that is released has been retained since the moon formed, or shortly thereafter

Small meteors collapsing against the moon cause water from the moon, according to NASA scientists. They suggest that the underground moisture that is released has been retained since the moon formed, or shortly thereafter

A decade ago, traces of water were found on the surface of the moon, and not just in polar ice deposits as previously thought.

Researchers have attributed the original water to solar wind and meteorites. However, the source and extent of these water tracks have been discussed.

Using an instrument aboard NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), planetary scientist Doctor Mehdi Benna said that the & # 39; high abnormally high and episodic amounts of water in the moon's atmosphere & # 39; picked up.

The LADEE revolved around the moon from October 2013 to April 2014 and the detections coincided with 29 meteor currents.

These findings can lay the foundation for future research into the origin and fate of water on the moon. The researchers estimate that meteorites on the moon cause the loss of no less than 200 tons of water per year (supply)

These findings can lay the foundation for future research into the origin and fate of water on the moon. The researchers estimate that meteorites on the moon cause the loss of no less than 200 tons of water per year (supply)

These findings can lay the foundation for future research into the origin and fate of water on the moon. The researchers estimate that meteorites on the moon cause the loss of no less than 200 tons of water per year (supply)

Dr. Benna and her team studied the amount of water released by meteor streams of different sizes.

They were then able to determine that the top 8 cm of the moon floor has dried out. # Below, they calculate that water is uniformly present in concentrations up to about 0.05 percent.

The full findings were published in Nature Geoscience.

WHAT OTHER EVIDENCE HAS BEEN FOUND FOR WATER ON THE MOON?

A number of researchers claim that future visitors can find water on the moon, above or below the surface or in the ground.

Such a discovery may mean that future lunar colonies can harvest water on the moon without taking it from the earth.

They could also convert it to hydrogen and oxygen for rocket fuel or oxygen to breathe, scientists claim.

In February 2018, a study found by the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado water in the form of OH – a more reactive relative of H2O – over the entire moon surface.

In September 2017, experts created the first map of water and the building blocks that were stuck in the upper part of the Earth's moon.

They claimed that water in this form is present almost everywhere on the surface of the moon.

A separate study that month showed that the surface of the moon retains more water than we thought.

It suggests that the interior of our natural satellite can contain a deep water reservoir.

This finding reinforces the idea that the moon's mantle is surprisingly water-rich, making it much easier to colonize it for future space exploration.

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