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Tyrannosaurus rex had an extremely stiff skull that allowed it to make its way through the bones of other creatures without the risk of cracking its own skull. Pictured, an impression of an artist showing the wild bite of T. rex, with the muscle model of the researcher on top

Tyrannosaurus rex had an & # 39; extremely stiff & # 39; skull through which he could get through the bones of other beings without cracking his own skull

  • Researchers created the first 3D model of the skull and ligaments of T. rex
  • They discovered that the famous dinosaur had a stiff skull such as crocodiles and hyenas
  • The findings wiped out the previous suggests that it had a flexible skull like birds do
  • Similar models can be used to understand how humans and animals also chew
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Tyrannosaurus rex had an extremely stiff skull that allowed it to make its way through the bones of other creatures without the risk of cracking its own skull.

A 3D model of the famous dinosaur's joints and ligaments showed that it had a skull similar to that in modern crocodiles and hyenas.

The finding comes from the previous theory that T. rex had a skull that was more flexible, as found in birds and snakes.

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Tyrannosaurus rex had an extremely stiff skull that allowed it to make its way through the bones of other creatures without the risk of cracking its own skull. Pictured, an impression of an artist showing the wild bite of T. rex, with the muscle model of the researcher on top

Tyrannosaurus rex had an extremely stiff skull that allowed it to make its way through the bones of other creatures without the risk of cracking its own skull. Pictured, an impression of an artist showing the wild bite of T. rex, with the muscle model of the researcher on top

WHAT WAS T. REX?

Tyrannosaurs rex was a kind of bird-like, carnivorous dinosaur.

It lived between 68-66 million years ago in what is now the western side of North America.

They could reach 40 feet (12 meters) long and 12 feet (4 meters) long.

To date, more than 50 fossilized copies of T. rex have been collected.

The monstrous animal had one of the strongest bites in the animal kingdom.

An artist & # 39; s impression of T. rex
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An artist & # 39; s impression of T. rex

An artist & # 39; s impression of T. rex

& # 39; The T. rex had a skull 6 feet long, 5 feet wide and 4 feet high – and bit with a force of about 6 tons, & # 39; said Kaleb Sellers, an anatomist at the University of Missouri.

& # 39; Previous researchers only viewed this from the bone perspective without taking into account all the connections – ligaments and cartilage – that really mediate the interactions between the bones. & # 39;

To address this, Mr. Sellers and colleagues created the very first 3D model of a T. rex that shows how the skull bands and joints of the dinosaur work.

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This enabled them to investigate how the roof of the mouth of a T. rex would have reacted to the tensions and tensions of chewing.

The team built their model using analysis of fossil T. rex skulls, as well as models of two of the modern dinosaur family members – a gecko and a parrot.

& # 39; Dinosaurs are like modern birds, crocodiles and lizards because they have inherited certain joints in their skulls of fish – ball joints, just like the hip joints of humans, & # 39; said paper author and anatomist Casey Holliday.

These, he added, typically lend themselves to & # 39; movement as in snakes & # 39 ;.

& # 39; If you put a lot of force on things, there is an interaction between movement and stability. Birds and lizards have more movement but less stability. & # 39;

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& # 39; When we applied their individual movements to the T. rex skull, we saw that it did not like to be moved in such a way as the lizard and the bird skulls – suggesting there is more stiffness. & # 39 ;

A 3D model of the famous dinosaur's joints and ligaments showed that it had a skull similar to that in modern crocodiles and hyenas.

A 3D model of the famous dinosaur's joints and ligaments showed that it had a skull similar to that in modern crocodiles and hyenas.

A 3D model of the famous dinosaur's joints and ligaments showed that it had a skull similar to that in modern crocodiles and hyenas.

The ability to model how joints and ligaments interact is research that can have applications that go beyond the study of fossilized prehistoric animals, the researchers say.

In addition to helping paleontologists with a detailed study of the anatomy of fossilized animals, researchers believe that their findings can help advance medicine in humans and animals by providing better models for the interaction of joints and ligaments.

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& # 39; In humans, this can also be applied to the way the jaws of people work, such as studying how the jaw joint is stressed by stresses and stresses during chewing, & # 39; said paper author Ian Cost, a biologist at Albright College in Pennsylvania.

& # 39; For example, by understanding how those movements take place and joints are loaded, veterinarians can better understand how to better treat exotic animals such as parrots suffering from arthritis. & # 39;

The full findings of the study were published in the journal The anatomical record.

The finding comes from the previous theory that T. rex had a skull that was more flexible, such as those found in birds and snakes

The finding comes from the previous theory that T. rex had a skull that was more flexible, such as those found in birds and snakes

The finding comes from the previous theory that T. rex had a skull that was more flexible, such as those found in birds and snakes

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