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The 28-year-old nurse was diagnosed with cervical cancer after her Pap smear was canceled due to a pandemic

A nurse has been diagnosed with cervical cancer after her Pap smear was canceled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Destiny Wade, 28, an oncology nurse from Crayford, South East London, is scheduled to have a Pap smear test in March.

She started having mild symptoms, such as bleeding after sex, but was told it was probably an expanded cyst.

Destiny, who also had coronavirus, went to the emergency room after a night of heavy bleeding and was told after three weeks of testing that she had a cancerous tumor the size of a tennis ball.

Destiny Wade, 28, should have had a Pap smear in March, but was canceled due to the pandemic

The bodybuilder is now diagnosed with a cancer the size of a tennis ball

The bodybuilder is now diagnosed with a cancer the size of a tennis ball

Destiny Wade, 28, pictured above, from Crayford, South East London, was scheduled to have a Pap smear in March, but was canceled due to the Covid-19 pandemic. She has now been diagnosed with a cancer the size of a tennis ball

She has now set up a GoFundMe page and an Instagram account to raise awareness about the importance of Pap smears.

She said, “I started having some symptoms in February, like bleeding after sex, but I didn’t think about it.

“In March I would have a Pap smear, which I do every three years, but my doctor called me and told me it was canceled because of Covid-19.

“When I said I had mild symptoms, I was told,” You are only 27, you have a low risk of cervical cancer, so you are not a priority. ” I was told I could make an appointment for the next 6 months.

“I had coronavirus and was out of work for four weeks – it was around that time that I started noticing abnormal bleeding.

“I spoke to my doctor on the phone who told me it was probably just an expanded cyst.

“The bleeding was every day in May – I’ve been on birth control pills since I was 15 and have never had any problems.

“One night I had very severe bleeding and I had a gut feeling, I thought ‘I can’t sit on this anymore’ so I took myself to A&E.”

Destiny, an oncology nurse, took herself to the emergency room after a night of heavy bleeding

Destiny, an oncology nurse, took herself to the emergency room after a night of heavy bleeding

Destiny, an oncology nurse, took herself to the emergency room after a night of heavy bleeding

She added, “I remember sitting in the car thinking they would smile in my face for taking themselves to the emergency room for bleeding, but I just felt like I wanted someone to take a look.

“I was in bed and the consultant was doing an internal exam – as soon as I saw her face, I knew something was wrong. She said I had a tumor the size of a tennis ball.

“I am a fit, active girl, I work with cancer, I thought I would know if I had it, but it turns out you can never know. If I had the Pap smear, I would have caught it in March. ‘

Destiny’s last Pap smear was in April 2017 and was “ 100 percent normal. ”

She started her first chemotherapy for six weeks, followed by another six weeks with radiotherapy.

She was also devastated to learn that the radiotherapy will weaken her uterus and that she cannot bear children.

But she underwent an ovarian transposition, an operation that moves the ovaries higher in the body to minimize the effect of the radiotherapy.

She added, “The ovarian transposition is done through keyhole surgery, and it’s amazing.

“They basically detach the ovaries and move them and pin them under my ribs. I literally have ovaries in my ribs – I’d love to see an X-ray.

“There will be damage from the radiotherapy, but it will decrease because my ovaries are higher in my body.

“I won’t be able to carry a baby, but I can have IVF and have a biological baby through a surrogate mother.

After three weeks of testing, she was diagnosed with cervical cancer and started her first chemotherapy for six weeks, followed by another six weeks with radiotherapy

After three weeks of testing, she was diagnosed with cervical cancer and started her first chemotherapy for six weeks, followed by another six weeks with radiotherapy

After three weeks of testing, she was diagnosed with cervical cancer and started her first chemotherapy for six weeks, followed by another six weeks with radiotherapy

Destiny in the picture with her colleagues. It tracks cancer wait times in England reaching record high during the coronavirus crisis, in figures revealed last week

Destiny in the picture with her colleagues. It tracks cancer wait times in England reaching record high during the coronavirus crisis, in figures revealed last week

Destiny in the picture with her colleagues. It tracks cancer wait times in England reaching record high during the coronavirus crisis, in figures revealed last week

The bodybuilder is diagnosed with grade three cancer and said if it was picked up earlier, it may still be in the first degree

The bodybuilder is diagnosed with grade three cancer and said if it was picked up earlier, it may still be in the first degree

She has set up a GoFundMe page and an Instagram account to raise awareness about the importance of Pap smears

She has set up a GoFundMe page and an Instagram account to raise awareness about the importance of Pap smears

The bodybuilder is diagnosed with grade three cancer and said that if he had been arrested earlier, “he may still have been in the first degree.” She has set up a GoFundMe page and an Instagram account to raise awareness about the importance of Pap smears

Destiny also wears a cooling scalp during chemotherapy to minimize the risk of hair loss – it’s a machine-attached jelly swim cap that freezes the cap and numbs the hair follicles.

Determined to beat cancer, the bodybuilder is eager to raise awareness for Pap smears.

She added, “I was told I’m in group three now – if it had been picked up earlier it might still have been in group one and they could have just removed it.

Most importantly, if you’re not happy with someone’s diagnosis, if you feel something is wrong, it doesn’t stop you from asking for a second opinion.

“I think it’s really sad that something like a Pap smear is considered a routine appointment.

The number of NHS patients admitted to routine surgery falls by 82% in a year, while 1.5 million people wait 18 weeks for treatment

The number of NHS patients admitted to routine surgery has fallen by 82 percent in a year, and 1.5 million people have been forced to wait at least 18 weeks to begin treatment, devastating statistics reveal.

Shocking data from NHS England that exposed the stress Covid-19 has placed on hospitals showed that only 54,550 patients were admitted for treatment in May – a fraction of the 295,000 registered this year last year.

And 1.45 million patients had to wait at least 18 weeks to start hospital treatment for routine surgeries such as hip and knee replacements – the worst since 2007 and more than double in May last year.

Top surgeons warned that the “time bomb” – fueled by thousands of non-emergency operations canceled during the pandemic peak – “has now exploded,” saying the crisis is “getting out of hand.”

Analysts revealed that the NHS is a “long and difficult road ahead” and that it is a “huge challenge” to catch up with patients whose treatment has been delayed.

“It’s one of those things women don’t like and need their GP to put pressure on them and convince them to get it done.

“It’s a little embarrassing, but it’s essential and life-saving. It still has a stigma, because women feel there is a judgment behind it. ‘

It follows cancer wait times in England that hit record high during the coronavirus crisis, in figures revealed last week.

Less than half of the people (47.9 percent) diagnosed with cancer after a screening appointment managed to receive treatment within the intended two-month period.

In May, hundreds of people had to wait more than eight weeks between reporting that they had cancer – likely breast, colon or cervical cancer – and receiving therapy.

The percentage of people treated for any type of cancer within two months of an urgent referral from their doctor also fell to its lowest in at least a decade.

And one in 16 patients (6.1 percent) waited at least a month to start treatment after a doctor decided they needed it.

The NHS, the government, charities and experts are urging people who think they have cancer symptoms to be checked as soon as possible.

Sara Bainbridge, head of policy at Macmillan Cancer Support, said, “We know many will have been afraid to bring up symptoms for fear of taxing the NHS or contracting coronavirus.

“As thousands of these ‘invisible patients’ are diagnosed with cancer and begin treatment, our cancer services are under greater pressure than ever before.”

NHS England data found that the percentage of people treated through the Cancer Screening Service within two months of a diagnosis had fallen from 78.9 percent in January to just 47.9 percent in May.

Screening is usually done in women and is checked for breast, colon and cervical cancer. The goal is to treat 90 percent of patients within two months if they are diagnosed.

It also found that the number of people treated within two months of a doctor’s referral – which can be for any cancer – dropped from 73.6 percent to 69.9 percent in the same time.

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