The 2,000-year-old statue of a horned Celtic fertility god is discovered in Cambridgeshire

The 2000-year-old figurine shows Celtic fertility God & Cernunnos & # 39 ;, the Celtic god of nature, life and the underworld. The face of the figure is worn away and it contains a & # 39; torc & # 39; or a neck ring that stands for

Rare 2,000-year-old statue of a horned Celtic fertility god dating back to a Roman settlement, discovered in Cambridgeshire

  • Metal figure is only two inches tall and has no face because it is wiped
  • Small individual has a & # 39; torc & # 39; or a neck ring that & # 39; Cernunnos & # 39; represents
  • It shows how accepting the Romans was from other religions, often the merging of gods
  • Experts have compared it to finding a worn-out version of Jesus on a crucifix

A 2000-year-old statue with Celtic fertility. God is exposed in an ancient Roman settlement by archaeologists in agricultural land in Cambridgeshire.

The discovery shows that there were strong ties between the old people of Great Britain and the Roman legionary soldier during their occupation of Great Britain between 100BC and 150AD.

The two-inch metal person has no idea how accepting the Romans was from other religions, often simply merging gods with their own religions.

The face of the small figure is worn away and contains a & # 39; torc & # 39; or a neck ring that & # 39; Cernunnos & # 39; represents, the Celtic god of nature, life and the underworld.

It dates from the second century AD. At that time the area was a rural settlement from the late Iron Age to the Early Roman period.

Scroll down for video

The 2000-year-old figurine shows Celtic fertility God & Cernunnos & # 39 ;, the Celtic god of nature, life and the underworld. The face of the figure is worn away and it contains a & # 39; torc & # 39; or a neck ring that stands for

The 2000-year-old statue was found at the National Trust's Wimpole Estate in Cambridgeshire. The face of the small figure is worn away and contains a & # 39; torc & # 39; or a neck ring that & # 39; Cernunnos & # 39; represents, the Celtic god of nature, life and the underworld.

Similar figures of Cernunnos have been found carved in stone, but it is the only metal statue of this Celtic god known in Britain, according to the National Trust.

It was found by archaeologists at Wimpole Estate of the National Trust, who compared the figure to finding a worn-out version of Jesus on a crucifix.

The settlement is supposed to be central to a strong trade network, with about 300 metal objects exposed during the excavation.

Other discoveries included coins, equipment for horse harnesses, Roman military uniforms, a spearhead, a hatchet, key handles, brooches and a ring.

Stephen Macaulay, the deputy regional manager of Oxford Archeology East who carried out the excavation, described the importance of the finding.

Macaulay said: "The face of the statue is rubbed away, but we see similar figures of Cernunnos, so it is like finding a worn version of Jesus on a crucifix, it is the form you expect to see.

& # 39; He was an important God for the Celts, but this shows that accepting the Romans was from other religions, that they often simply joined the Gods with theirs.

The settlement is supposed to be central to a strong trade network, with about 300 metal objects exposed during the excavation. The discoveries included: coins, equipment of horse harnesses, Roman military uniforms, a spearhead, a hatchet, key handles, brooches and a ring

The settlement is supposed to be central to a strong trade network, with about 300 metal objects exposed during the excavation. The discoveries included: coins, equipment of horse harnesses, Roman military uniforms, a spearhead, a hatchet, key handles, brooches and a ring

The settlement is supposed to be central to a strong trade network, with about 300 metal objects exposed during the excavation. The discoveries included: coins, equipment of horse harnesses, Roman military uniforms, a spearhead, a hatchet, key handles, brooches and a ring

Similar figures of Cernunnos have been found carved in stone, pictured here is an example, but it is the only metal statue of this Celtic god known in Britain, according to the National Trust

Similar figures of Cernunnos have been found carved in stone, pictured here is an example, but it is the only metal statue of this Celtic god known in Britain, according to the National Trust

Similar figures of Cernunnos have been found carved in stone, pictured here is an example, but it is the only metal statue of this Celtic god known in Britain, according to the National Trust

The Romans really ruled their empire as the British did, they would overcome the people who were already in charge and then recover.

The Wimpole story is interesting because it gives us a snapshot of the locals who live next to the legionaries as they travel through the country along Ermine Street. & # 39;

The figurine is cleaned, cataloged and analyzed and forms the basis for future exhibitions in Wimpole.

The figurine is cleaned, cataloged and analyzed and forms the basis for future exhibitions in Wimpole

The figurine is cleaned, cataloged and analyzed and forms the basis for future exhibitions in Wimpole

The figurine is cleaned, cataloged and analyzed and forms the basis for future exhibitions in Wimpole

Shannon Hogan, National Trust's Archaeologist for the East of England, said: "This is an incredibly exciting discovery, which for me represents more than just the deity, Cernunnos.

It almost seems like the enigmatic & # 39; face & # 39; of the people who lived in the landscape 2,000 years ago.

The artefact is originally Roman but symbolizes a Celtic deity and is therefore an example of the continuation of indigenous religious and cultural symbolism in Romanized societies. & # 39;

WHEN DOES THE ROMANS HAVE BRITTANIA?

55BC – Julius Caesar crossed the canal with about 10,000 soldiers. They landed on a beach in Deal and were met by a group of Britons. Caesar was forced to withdraw.

54BC – Caesar crossed the canal with 27,000 infantry and cavalry. Again they arrived at the deal, but were unhindered. They marched inland and after heavy battles, they defeated the British and surrendered the chief tribes.

Later that year, however, Caesar had to return to Gaul to solve problems and the Romans left.

54BC – 43BC – Although no Romans were present in Great Britain during these years, their influence increased as a result of trade relations.

43AD – A Roman force of 40,000 led by Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. The emperor Claudius arrived with reinforcements in Colchester. Claudius appointed Plautius as governor of Great Britain and returned to Rome.

In 43AD a Roman artist (artist impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived with reinforcements in Colchester

In 43AD a Roman artist (artist impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived with reinforcements in Colchester

In 43AD a Roman artist (artist impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived with reinforcements in Colchester

47AD – Londinium (London) was founded and Britain was declared part of the Roman Empire. Networks of roads were built across the country.

75 – 77AD – Romans defeated the last resistant tribes, making all Britons Roman. Many Britons began to adopt Roman customs and legislation.

122AD – Emperor Hadrian ordered that a wall be built between England and Scotland to keep out Scottish tribes.

312AD – Emperor Constantine made Christianity legal throughout the Roman Empire.

228AD – The Romans were attacked by barbarian tribes and soldiers stationed in the country, were recalled to Rome.

410AD – All Romans were called back to Rome and Emperor Honorious told Britons that they had no connection with Rome anymore.

Source: history on the net

.