The 16-year-old girl from Ohio calls 911 about her father after confiscating her $ 800 phone as a punishment

& # 39; My Dad took over my property & # 39 ;: the furious 16-year-old girl in Ohio called 911 about her father after he confiscated her $ 800 phone (but the police did NOT sympathize)

  • Bodycam video shows police responding to the 911 call Saturday in South Euclid
  • The girl had said to the dispatchers: "My father took my property, which is a $ 800 phone that is not his. He did not buy it & # 39;
  • The father, Anthony Robertson, explained: "I can not inspect it because the phone is locked, so I removed it & # 39;
  • Officers decided that it was a parental disciplinary problem and chose the side of the father

Megan Sheets for Dailymail.com

A 16-year-old girl called the police to her father after he removed her phone as a punishment for having a password, say Ohio officials.

Bodycam recordings show the moment when the officers responded to the 911 call from the teenager, who told the coordinators: "My father took my property, a $ 800 phone that was not his. He did not buy it. & # 39;

Lieutenant James Wilson of the South Euclid police station said that officers recognized the situation as an opportunity to teach, and WKYC said: "Certainly if we were busy, it would be put on the back burner, but we are still obliged to to respond. "

The father, Anthony Robertson, and his daughter were both outside the house when officers arrived on Saturday afternoon.

The teenager, whose name has not been released because she is a minor, can be heard saying: I want my phone. & # 39;

Robertson then explains: "I took her phone because she is a younger person, and I do not want her to get it.

& # 39; I can not inspect it because the phone is locked, so I removed it. & # 39;

The officers determined that it was only a parental disciplinary matter and chose Robertson.

A 16-year-old girl called the police to her father, Anthony Robertson, after he had taken away her phone as a punishment. Images from Bodycam show agents arriving at Robertson's home in South Euclid, Ohio, after the teenager called 911 on Saturday afternoon

A 16-year-old girl called the police to her father, Anthony Robertson, after he had taken away her phone as a punishment. Images from Bodycam show agents arriving at Robertson's home in South Euclid, Ohio, after the teenager called 911 on Saturday afternoon

Robertson explained to the officers: "I took her phone because she is a younger person and I do not want her to get it. I can not inspect it because the phone is locked, so I removed it & # 39;

Robertson explained to the officers: "I took her phone because she is a younger person and I do not want her to get it. I can not inspect it because the phone is locked, so I removed it & # 39;

Robertson explained to the officers: "I took her phone because she is a younger person and I do not want her to get it. I can not inspect it because the phone is locked, so I removed it & # 39;

The girl says: "It's my property and I do not live here," claiming she lives with her grandmother, but stays home with her father from time to time.

One of the officers responds: & # 39; But guess what? Everything you own is from your mother and your father. Having a telephone is not a right. & # 39;

Robertson adds: & # 39; It's a privilege. & # 39;

The officers then warned the teenager not to call 911 in non-emergency situations.

A report on the incident on the Facebook page of the South Euclid Police Department was liked and shared hundreds of times by empathic parents.

It also led to a debate about the property rights of teenagers.

Lt Wilson said: & # 39; Our department would be this kind of & # 39; theft & # 39; not pursuing.

& # 39; You would be hard pressed to find a court in this country that would address the case. & # 39;

After the incident with WKYC, Robertson said he was startled when the police appeared at his home.

& # 39; There are four cars & I have something like, oh my god, the police are coming and they look pretty cool, & # 39; he said.

Robertson defended his decision to take his daughter's phone away and said: "To all parents, you know that?" Stay on them. There are so many hidden apps and small ways that they can hide and hide what they do on those phones. It's ridiculous. & # 39;

Do you know the father in this story? Send an e-mail to Sean.O & # 39; Hare@mailonline.com.

The girl, who was not named or pictured because she is a minor, claimed that the father had stolen her property because he had not bought the phone. The police chose Robertson and told the teenager that having a cell phone was a privilege, not a right

The girl, who was not named or pictured because she is a minor, claimed that the father had stolen her property because he had not bought the phone. The police chose Robertson and told the teenager that having a cell phone was a privilege, not a right

The girl, who was not named or pictured because she is a minor, claimed that the father had stolen her property because he had not bought the phone. The police chose Robertson and told the teenager that having a cell phone was a privilege, not a right

Lt. James Wilson (above) of the South Euclid police told WKYC: "Certainly when we were busy, it would be put on the back burner, but we are still obliged to respond."

Lt. James Wilson (above) of the South Euclid police told WKYC: "Certainly when we were busy, it would be put on the back burner, but we are still obliged to respond."

Lt. James Wilson (above) of the South Euclid police told WKYC: "Certainly when we were busy, it would be put on the back burner, but we are still obliged to respond."

.