The 12 skills that employers REALLY want, and why universities do not prepare graduates

Universities are not preparing students for the world of work, revealed the QS 2018 Global Employer Survey

Universities are not preparing students for the world of work, as new research reveals that employers value different skills that graduates consider important.

The QS 2018 Global Employer Survey questioned more than 11,000 employers and 16,000 potential students to identify the misconceptions that graduates have.

The report, published this week, revealed that students do not understand how employers value skills, reported news.com.au.

Universities are not preparing students for the world of work, revealed the QS 2018 Global Employer Survey

Universities are not preparing students for the world of work, revealed the QS 2018 Global Employer Survey

The survey questioned more than 11,000 employers and 16,000 students to identify the misconceptions of graduates

The survey questioned more than 11,000 employers and 16,000 students to identify the misconceptions of graduates

The survey questioned more than 11,000 employers and 16,000 students to identify the misconceptions of graduates

"For example, students overestimate the importance of creativity and leadership skills, and underestimate the importance of flexibility / adaptability and teamwork," says the report.

QS executive director Nunzio Quacquarelli said that social skills had increased in importance, almost surpassing technical skills and knowledge developed to a degree.

"Internship opportunities, study abroad, extracurricular activities and active learning can contribute to the development of these and other skills that universities want," he said.

Mr. Quacquarelli said universities should teach soft skills to prepare students for the world of work.

Soft skills generally refer to work ethic, positive attitude, communication, teamwork, time management and problem solving.

The survey ranked the twelve most important skills for the two groups, providing an insightful comparison.

Employers of qualified skills as the most important for graduates:

1. Troubleshooting

2. Team work

3. Communication

4 Adaptability

5. Data analysis

6. Resistance

7. Organization

8. Technical skills

9. Creativity

10. Leadership

11. Language

12. Commercial awareness

The skills that the students thought were the most important:

1. Creativity

2. Organization

3. Troubleshooting

4. Leadership

5. Team work

6. Communication

7. Resistance

8. Commercial awareness

9. Adaptability

10. Technical skills

11. Language

12. Data analysis

The students determined that creativity was the most important skill, but the employers ranked it in ninth place, marking the biggest difference between the two groups.

The data analysis was classified at the bottom of the list for the students, while the employers determined that it was the fifth most important skill.

Leadership reached number four for students, but ranked 10th for employers. The adaptability was in fourth place for the graduates, but ninth for the students.

Problem solving was the only skill that ranks in the top three for both groups.

"From the employer's point of view, the ability of students to learn is much more important than the creativity or leadership they have already developed," the report says.

QS executive director Nunzio Quacquarelli said that soft skills had increased in importance, almost surpassing technical skills and knowledge developed to a degree.

QS executive director Nunzio Quacquarelli said that soft skills had increased in importance, almost surpassing technical skills and knowledge developed to a degree.

QS executive director Nunzio Quacquarelli said that soft skills had increased in importance, almost surpassing technical skills and knowledge developed to a degree.

The survey also questioned the employer's satisfaction about the skills of its graduates.

Teamwork received a satisfaction score of 82, followed by technical and interpersonal skills, both with 78 points. Problem solving received 71 points.

The lowest number of points was 58 for negotiation and leadership skills.

Resilience scored 60 points and the survey revealed that it is a key skill in which Australian students perform less, compared to other countries.

The report classified the twelve most important skills for the two groups, providing an insightful comparison

The report classified the twelve most important skills for the two groups, providing an insightful comparison

The report classified the twelve most important skills for the two groups, providing an insightful comparison

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