Thames Valley Police will not punish people who are caught with heroin and cocaine under controversial intent

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

People who are caught with hard drugs, including heroin, ecstasy and cocaine, will escape any punishment under a controversial new plan from the local police of Theresa May.

Instead of arresting those who found drugs, officials recommend that they talk to an addiction service – but they will not accept any sanctions if they ignore the advice.

The initiative, which was launched last week by the Thames Valley Police, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever to be introduced in England.

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

The project & # 39; drug deterioration & # 39; goes beyond the existing arrangements in Avon and Somerset, where users are required to attend an education session to prevent prosecution, and in Durham, where addicts are arrested and have to adhere to good behavior & # 39 ; contract to prevent prosecution.

In Cleveland, a handful of drug users will be allowed to inject heroin in a police-funded clinic next year.

Critics condemned the project in the back garden of the prime minister last night as a disturbing new example of soft justice & # 39 ;.

The initiative will see that someone with small amounts of each drug is asked if they want to participate in a & # 39; diversion scheme & # 39;

The officer, who will confiscate the drugs and decide if there is sufficient quantity to suspect them of acting, will say: "I am here to encourage you to get help."

If the user agrees, the officer records his details and makes an appointment with a local drug service provider.

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

The initiative, which was launched by Thames Valley Police last week, and which includes the Prime Minister's Maidenhead constituency, is the mildest of its kind ever introduced in England

The police believe that this approach reduces the time spent on dealing with a property crime from 12 hours to just 20 minutes.

They will later check whether the person attended the meeting, but only to help assess the success of the schedule instead of forcing the visit or handing out a penalty because they are not going.

Thames Valley will register the possession of drugs as a crime, but will not hold the person in custody or give any warning, warning or condemnation.

Even if the same person is caught again with drugs later on, they will escape persecution if they are seen as & # 39; positively involved & # 39; in healthcare.

However, if someone is caught using drugs as a dealer, or refuses to cooperate, they will be arrested.

The same applies if someone is caught after he has not previously attended the health appointment.

Thames Valley will register the possession of drugs as a crime, but will not take the person into custody or give any warning, warning or condemnation.

Thames Valley will register the possession of drugs as a crime, but will not take the person into custody or give any warning, warning or condemnation.

Thames Valley will register the possession of drugs as a crime, but will not take the person into custody or give any warning, warning or condemnation.

The plan began in West Berkshire last week and will initially run for three months. If it is determined that it has been a success, it could spread over the force area that includes Oxfordshire, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire.

Assistant Chief Constable Jason Hogg stressed that the approach does not amount to decriminalizing illicit drugs and saving lives. & # 39; People see the police as just an arresting force – we want this to be a very positive intervention, and encourage people to be more positive about health, & # 39; he said.

We hope that these interventions will break the cycle of abusive and drug use, because enforcement in itself is clearly not enough. & # 39;

He added that the force could concentrate its limited resources on tackling drug dealers.

Last night, Mary Brett, president of charity Cannabis Skunk Sense, said: "It is absolutely shameful. There is a law and the police must uphold it, but this is normalizing drugs.

When people think they are not being arrested, more and more drugs will be used and they will be packed with problems such as psychosis and overdoses. & # 39;

But a spokesman for the pro-legalization group Transform said: Criminalization can damage life chances, trap people in a life of crime and kill by stigmatization and help to those in need.

This scheme will reduce deaths, reduce recidivism and shorten police time, making local communities safer. & # 39;

The law on possession of class A drugs such as heroin and cocaine has a maximum sentence of seven years in prison.

For class B drugs, including cannabis, the maximum period is five years.

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