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Texas law connects unsolicited sexually explicit photos with a fine of up to $ 500 and partners with feminist dating app Bumble

  • Texas has introduced strict new laws to prevent & # 39; cyberflashes & # 39; to fight
  • The state has partnered with Bumble to prevent users from sending unsolicited images
  • The new law comes after state Rep. Morgan Meyer and Bumble passed the bill earlier this year and will take effect on Saturday
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Texas has introduced strict new laws to prevent & # 39; cyberflashes & # 39; while more and more people share intimate photos of their ex-partners to get revenge.

The state has partnered with Bumble to prevent users from sending unsolicited nude photos to dating apps and elsewhere in cyberspace.

The new law comes after state Rep. Morgan Meyer collaborated with Bumble to implement the bill earlier this year and take effect on Saturday.

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Rep. Morgan Meyer
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Rep. Morgan Meyer

Texas is working with Bumble to prevent users from sending unsolicited nude photos to dating apps and elsewhere in cyberspace. The new law comes after state Rep. Morgan Meyer and Bumble passed the bill earlier this year and will take effect on Saturday

& # 39; They had a number of people using the app and complaining about sending these images, and they soon realized that there was no story, & # 39; said Meyer, describing how Whitney Wolfe Herd, the CEO of Bumble, approached him about collaboration.

& # 39; There was nothing that could be done. It was not a criminal offense, although it was certainly digital sexual harassment. & # 39;

From Saturday, it is illegal to send unsolicited sexually explicit material with a fine of up to $ 500.

Meyer said the law targeting unwanted images applies to texts, email, dating apps, and social media.

A 2017 Pew Research Center study found that women experience online sexual harassment at much higher rates than men.

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The study found that 21 percent of women aged 18 to 29 were sexually harassed online, compared to nine percent of men in the same age group.

& # 39; They had some people using the app and complaining about sending these images and they soon realized there was no story & # 39 ;, Meyer said, describing how Whitney Wolfe Herd (photo), the CEO of Bumble, approached him about collaboration

& # 39; They had some people using the app and complaining about sending these images and they soon realized there was no story & # 39 ;, Meyer said, describing how Whitney Wolfe Herd (photo), the CEO of Bumble, approached him about collaboration

& # 39; They had some people using the app and complaining about sending these images and they soon realized there was no story & # 39 ;, Meyer said, describing how Whitney Wolfe Herd (photo), the CEO of Bumble, approached him about collaboration

Meanwhile, about 53 percent of those women said that someone has sent them explicit images that they want to receive.

For example, 46 states currently have laws that deal with so-called revenge porn, but almost none of them combat unsolicited sexually explicit images, reports the Cyber ​​Civil Rights Initiative.

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Despite progress, a lawyer said Texas law will face enforcement issues and legal challenges to be too broad and non-specific.

& # 39; It achieves things that can demonstrably include images related to medical advice or mothers who share information about breastfeeding or their baby's health & # 39; s – things such as that certainly cannot be made punishable, & # 39 ; J.T. Morris said, according to ABC.

Caroline Ellis Roche, chief of staff at Bumble, said she understands that enforcing the law will be difficult, but the Texas legislation is meant as a deterrent.

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