Texas doctor relinquishes leadership roles after sexist comments

Texas-based internal medicine specialist Dr. Gary Tigges, who was criticized for saying that female colleagues

Texas-based internal medicine specialist Dr. Gary Tigges, who was criticized for saying that female colleagues "do not work so hard," has left his leadership positions.

A Texas doctor who was in trouble this month after providing a sexist survey on the gender gap for the Dallas Medical Journal has relinquished his leadership roles in the hospital.

Plano-based internal medicine specialist, Dr. Gary Tigges, participated in a survey for the newspaper, in which 7,500 doctors were asked if they believed there was a gender gap in their medical profession.

Tigges shared a rather abrasive response, which appeared in the September issue of the magazine titled "Women in Medicine".

The doctor wrote: Yes, there is a salary gap. The doctors do not work as hard and do not see as many patients as the male doctors.

This is because they choose it, or they just do not want to be rushed, or do not want to work long hours. Most of the time, their priority is something else … family, social, whatever. "

He concluded in the response: "It is not necessary to" do anything "about this unless the doctors really want to work harder and set the schedule, if not, they should be paid less, that's fair."

In a new statement, a spokesman for Texas Health Plano said Tigges resigned his duties on the executive board of the medical board and the credentials committee, where he served as chairman.

Plano president Josh Floren announced Tigges' resignation in a written statement to hospital employees.

Floren said: "This past weekend we learned about the comments that Dr. Gary Tigges made to the Dallas Medical Journal regarding the pay inequalities of physicians between genders, which spread rapidly on social media.

"His comments were and remain extremely divisive and have caused a great deal of pain and concern among the medical staff, the Dallas-Fort Worth medical community and the entire country."

He concluded that the comments "do not reflect the views or values ​​of Texas Health Resources or Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano."

After his sexist commentary was published, Tigges quickly regretted his words after receiving furious responses in exchange for his colleagues and readers of the magazine.

Several medical professors shared their disappointment in social networks.

Tigges shared a rather abrasive response in the September issue of the magazine titled & # 39; Women in Medicine & # 39;

Tigges shared a rather abrasive response in the September issue of the magazine titled & # 39; Women in Medicine & # 39;

Tigges shared a rather abrasive response in the September issue of the magazine titled & # 39; Women in Medicine & # 39;

The comment was part of a magazine survey that asked doctors about the gender pay gap

The comment was part of a magazine survey that asked doctors about the gender pay gap

The comment was part of a magazine survey that asked doctors about the gender pay gap

Texas Health Plan president Josh Floren announced Tigges' resignation from leadership roles in the hospital (pictured above) in a written statement to employees

Texas Health Plan president Josh Floren announced Tigges' resignation from leadership roles in the hospital (pictured above) in a written statement to employees

Texas Health Plan president Josh Floren announced Tigges' resignation from leadership roles in the hospital (pictured above) in a written statement to employees

Nathalie Martinek wrote on Twitter: "The data and the evidence would be really great to include in your evaluation and productivity of #womeninmedicine. Stop talking, Gary!

Andi Murphy agreed that the gender pay gap exists, but contradicted Tigges' statement that suggests women are less productive in the workplace.

"My last job at the hospital was paid per shift with the WRVU goals and the corresponding bonuses, my productivity numbers were systematically at the top of the whole group," Murphy wrote.

"I discovered that six years in my shift rate was 30% less than all my male colleagues, including new graduates."

Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez added: "I'm so upset with @DallasCMS for publishing this, I encourage you wholeheartedly and @texmed to make a great article highlighting #WomenInMedicine and I'll be happy to help."

Several doctors shared their two cents on the controversial issue in social networks

Several doctors shared their two cents on the controversial issue in social networks

Several doctors shared their two cents on the controversial issue in social networks

Tigges published an apology on top of his Plano internal medicine bio after he was punished for comments.

The statement said: "I have heard from several trusted medical colleagues who disagree and are deeply offended and offended by the comments I made to the Dallas Medical Journal about pay equity between male and female doctors.

& # 39; I want to thank you for contacting me and sharing your concerns. Now I understand more clearly how complex this issue is and that there are ways we can work together to resolve these disparities.

"I have worked closely with numerous doctors for almost three decades and have seen nothing but compassion, diligence and professionalism."

He concluded: "I sincerely apologize to all the doctors for my comments and the pain they caused.

"I also need to apologize to my partners and staff at Plano Internal Medicine Associates, where we have an open and supportive work environment, and where we do not tolerate discrimination based on gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation or religion."

Tigges started a private practice at the Presbyterian Hospital of Plano in 1995 and founded Plano Internal Medicine the following year, according to his biography.

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