Home US Texas county declares state of emergency ahead of solar eclipse, with population set to DOUBLE from influx of tourists – as others snap up $1,000 Austin to Detroit plane seats to view from the skies

Texas county declares state of emergency ahead of solar eclipse, with population set to DOUBLE from influx of tourists – as others snap up $1,000 Austin to Detroit plane seats to view from the skies

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Dell County in Texas has declared a state of emergency as its population of 400,000 is set to double, or even triple, ahead of April's total solar eclipse.

A small Texas county has declared a state of emergency as its population of 400,000 is set to double, or even triple, ahead of April’s total solar eclipse.

Officials in Bell County in central Texas are preparing for challenges such as traffic congestion, fuel shortages and pressure on first responders, hospitals and food supplies, while thousands of tourists are expected to flood the city.

County Judge David Blackburn said the emergency declaration will help the county plan for the eclipse and protect both residents and visitors, he said. dallas morning news.

Meanwhile, some eclipse enthusiasts are opting to board flights from Austin to Detroit, Michigan, to witness the spectacle for a few minutes from the sky, as tickets for Delta 1218, priced at $1,129, sold out in a matter of hours last week.

The total solar eclipse (when the Moon completely covers the face of the Sun) will be visible to about 32 million people across a narrow strip of North and Central America on April 8.

Dell County in Texas has declared a state of emergency as its population of 400,000 is set to double, or even triple, ahead of April's total solar eclipse.

Dell County in Texas has declared a state of emergency as its population of 400,000 is set to double, or even triple, ahead of April’s total solar eclipse.

Central Texas officials are preparing for challenges such as traffic congestion, fuel shortages and pressure on first responders, hospitals and food supplies, while thousands of tourists are expected to flood the city.

Central Texas officials are preparing for challenges such as traffic congestion, fuel shortages and pressure on first responders, hospitals and food supplies, while thousands of tourists are expected to flood the city.

Central Texas officials are preparing for challenges such as traffic congestion, fuel shortages and pressure on first responders, hospitals and food supplies, while thousands of tourists are expected to flood the city.

Meanwhile, some eclipse enthusiasts are choosing to board flights from Austin to Detroit, Michigan, to witness the spectacle from the sky for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, some eclipse enthusiasts are choosing to board flights from Austin to Detroit, Michigan, to witness the spectacle from the sky for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, some eclipse enthusiasts are choosing to board flights from Austin to Detroit, Michigan, to witness the spectacle from the sky for a few minutes.

The total solar eclipse, when the Moon completely covers the face of the Sun, will be visible to about 32 million people across a narrow strip of North and Central America on April 8.

The total solar eclipse, when the Moon completely covers the face of the Sun, will be visible to about 32 million people across a narrow strip of North and Central America on April 8.

The total solar eclipse, when the Moon completely covers the face of the Sun, will be visible to about 32 million people across a narrow strip of North and Central America on April 8.

The solar eclipse will be visible along a “path of totality,” beginning in Mexico and moving through Texas, where it will travel to New England and end in Canada.

With thousands of visitors flocking to Texas cities to see this rare phenomenon, authorities anticipate strains on the supply of food, groceries and fuel, along with local infrastructure.

“To protect the health, safety and well-being of both residents and visitors, Bell County has determined that extraordinary measures must be taken in the form of a local disaster declaration,” the county said in a statement.

Homeowners hosting parties with more than 50 people must register with the Bell County Office of Emergency Management.

Authorities also advised residents to stay home, avoid driving, fill up vehicles ahead and buy food days before the eclipse.

Texas Department of Transportation spokesman Tony Hartzel said the traffic could be comparable to the fallout from several major football games ending all at the same time.

As resources dwindle in small towns, the skies are becoming an unexpected destination for some eclipse enthusiasts who are willing to spend more than $1,000 on a flight seat just to witness the spectacle for a few minutes.

With thousands of visitors flocking to Texas cities to see this rare phenomenon, authorities anticipate strains on the supply of food, groceries and fuel, along with local infrastructure. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

With thousands of visitors flocking to Texas cities to see this rare phenomenon, authorities anticipate strains on the supply of food, groceries and fuel, along with local infrastructure. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

With thousands of visitors flocking to Texas cities to see this rare phenomenon, authorities anticipate strains on the supply of food, groceries and fuel, along with local infrastructure. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

Authorities also advised residents to stay home, avoid driving, fill up vehicles ahead and buy food days before the eclipse. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

Authorities also advised residents to stay home, avoid driving, fill up vehicles ahead and buy food days before the eclipse. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

Authorities also advised residents to stay home, avoid driving, fill up vehicles ahead and buy food days before the eclipse. Pictured: People watch the annular solar eclipse in Brownsville, Texas.

Delta Flight 1218, from Austin to Detroit, will be operated on an A220-300 that offers “especially premium viewing due to the aircraft’s oversized windows,” according to a statement from Delta Airlines.

The ‘Path of Totality’ flight is offered “specifically so that Umbraphiles can spend as much time as possible directly within the path of totality.”

The price of the three-hour trip soared to more than $1,000 last week, while other Delta flights operating between the two cities typically cost between $200 and $300.

Despite the shocking price, tickets sold out within 24 hours and travelers are trying to get seats on other routes that have the opportunity to see the solar event.

“The April 8 eclipse is the last total eclipse we will see over North America until 2044,” said Warren Weston, chief meteorologist for Delta Air Lines.

“This eclipse will last more than twice as long as the one that occurred in 2017, and the path is almost twice as wide.”

As resources dwindle in small towns, the skies are becoming an unexpected destination for some eclipse enthusiasts who are willing to spend more than $1,000 on a flight seat just to witness the spectacle for a few minutes.

As resources dwindle in small towns, the skies are becoming an unexpected destination for some eclipse enthusiasts who are willing to spend more than $1,000 on a flight seat just to witness the spectacle for a few minutes.

As resources dwindle in small towns, the skies are becoming an unexpected destination for some eclipse enthusiasts who are willing to spend more than $1,000 on a flight seat just to witness the spectacle for a few minutes.

Delta Flight 1218, from Austin to Detroit, will be operated on an A220-300 that offers “especially premium viewing due to the aircraft’s oversized windows,” according to a statement from Delta Airlines. Pictured: The moment of totality seen from an Alaska Airlines flight in 2017

Dr Greg Brown, astronomer at Royal Greenwich Observatory, told MailOnline: “For North American observers, this is the best chance of seeing a total solar eclipse this decade.”

Southwest Airlines also announced flights that will have the best opportunities to view the eclipse, including flights from Dallas to Pittsburgh, which will depart at 12:45 p.m. local time, and one from Austin to Indianapolis, which will depart at 12:50 p.m.

When will the total solar eclipse occur?

After passing through Mexico, the first state to see the total solar eclipse on April 8 will be:

Texas (as of 1:27 p.m. CDT)

Then it will go to the following states:

  • Oklahoma (13:43 CDT)
  • Arkansas (1:45 p.m. CDT)
  • Missouri (13:53 CDT)
  • Tennessee (13:58 CDT)
  • Kentucky (13:58 CDT)
  • Illinois (13:58 CDT)
  • Indiana (14:01 CDT)
  • Ohio (15:08EDT)
  • Michigan (15:12EDT)
  • Pennsylvania (3:15 p.m. Eastern Time)
  • NY (15:16EDT)
  • Vermont (3:25 p.m. Eastern Time)
  • New Hampshire (15:28EDT)
  • Maine (15:28EDT)

It will end in eastern Canada. Other parts of the US will only see a partial eclipse, because they are outside the ‘path of totality’

Source: timeanddate.com

Michelle Newcomb, a 54-year-old retired teacher who will board one of the flights, told the WSJ: “I would love to be able to say I experienced a total eclipse from a plane.” I want that in my obituary.

Whether from the ground or the sky, the total eclipse should be visible for about four minutes, as long as views are taken along the path of totality.

Dr Greg Brown, astronomer at Royal Greenwich Observatory, told MailOnline: “For North American observers, this is the best chance of seeing a total solar eclipse this decade.”

“Nothing compares to the day turned into night that arises from a total eclipse.”

‘North America will not be in the path of a total solar eclipse again until 2033, when an eclipse will graze Alaska. The rest of the United States and Canada will have to wait until 2044 and 2045, when there will be another pair of solar eclipses to enjoy.’

According to Dr. Brown, a total solar eclipse occurs when the moon and sun align “perfectly.”

He said: “Only when it aligns perfectly, so that the center of the Sun and the center of the Moon pass in front of each other, does a total solar eclipse occur.”

Like any eclipse, it is important not to look directly at the sun with the naked eye while the event occurs, even through sunglasses, binoculars, or a telescope.

A simple pinhole projector, solar eclipse glasses, which can be purchased online, or special solar filters are much safer.

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