Tesla police car forced to leave high pursuit because the battery was almost empty

Tesla squadron car must give up a high-speed pursuit because the electric battery is low

  • Officer Jesse Hartman had to give up a chase after his Telsa ran out of battery
  • He was chasing a & # 39; offense vehicle & # 39; wanted for a crime in Santa Clara on Friday
  • The officer had to find a loading place during the chase that drove up to 120 mph
  • The vehicle was left abandoned after other police officers and CHP stopped the pursuit
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A police officer in California had to give up a high-speed pursuit of up to 120 km / h because his Tesla police car was nearly empty.

Fremont officer Jesse Hartman pursued a & # 39; offense vehicle & # 39; that was sought in connection with a crime in Santa Clara when he found that his vehicle was almost empty.

He saw the car parked on Friday in the lot of a company in Ivrington District and after confirming that the license plate was correct, he tried a traffic stop.

The driver left with a & # 39; high speed & # 39; followed by the Tesla and other units, including California Highway Patrol, told a police spokesperson DailyMail.com.

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After the warning from the Tesla, Hartman reported to send: & # 39; I have just less than ten kilometers of battery capacity on the Tesla, so I can lose it like this.

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A Fremont police officer was forced to pursue a & # 39; offense vehicle & # 39; to leave because of a crime in Santa Clara on Friday because of an almost empty battery

A Fremont police officer was forced to pursue a & # 39; offense vehicle & # 39; to leave because of a crime in Santa Clara on Friday because of an almost empty battery

Officer Jesse Hartman had to stop his pursuit near the Jacklin Road exit on Interstate 680 south in Milpitas, where other police and highway patrol took over

Officer Jesse Hartman had to stop his pursuit near the Jacklin Road exit on Interstate 680 south in Milpitas, where other police and highway patrol took over

Officer Jesse Hartman had to stop his pursuit near the Jacklin Road exit on Interstate 680 south in Milpitas, where other police and highway patrol took over

& # 39; If someone else is capable, can they maneuver to number one? & # 39; he added according to an audio recording.

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Other officers took over the chase, which ended quickly because it was no longer considered safe due to & # 39; unsafe driving maneuvers by the suspect & # 39 ;.

After the 10-mile chase near South Milpitas, the suspect's vehicle was found abandoned in San Jose.

In the meantime, the Tesla Model S patrol car was taken to a charging point in the area and later returned to Fremont.

A spokesperson said DailyMail.com that they could not comment on an & # 39; exact reason & # 39; why this car was not fully charged on that day.

They said: & Unfortunately, this happens from time to time even in our gas-powered vehicles if they are not refueled at the end of a service.

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& # 39; It's not too often, but we've had a number of situations in which officers run out of gas. & # 39;

The police car had less than 50 percent battery power when the officer started his shift at 2 p.m. and continued driving for 9 p.m.

This meant that the vehicle had used almost two full services before it had to be charged, the police reported.

A Fremont Police Department told DailyMail.com that the vehicle was charged less than 50 percent when Hartman entered the vehicle. From there it lasted nine hours later until the end of his service and until the pursuit. They could not comment on why the vehicle was only partially charged

A Fremont Police Department told DailyMail.com that the vehicle was charged less than 50 percent when Hartman entered the vehicle. From there it lasted nine hours later until the end of his service and until the pursuit. They could not comment on why the vehicle was only partially charged

A Fremont Police Department told DailyMail.com that the vehicle was charged less than 50 percent when Hartman entered the vehicle. From there it lasted nine hours later until the end of his service and until the pursuit. They could not comment on why the vehicle was only partially charged

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The spokesperson said there was no written policy regarding gas or loading vehicles, but general guidelines state that they should be at least half full at the start of a service.

They said DailyMail.com: & # 39; This one copy does not change our feeling about the performance of the vehicle for patrol purposes.

& # 39; Up to now, the car has met or exceeded our expectations. We are still in our first 6 months of the pilot program and we keep all data. & # 39;

The Tesla can drive up to 265 miles on a single load, police told Fremont Sacramento Bee. The armed forces want to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to 25 percent from the level of 2005.

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